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Old 12-14-2013, 11:12 AM
 
1,422 posts, read 1,821,332 times
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2012 Poverty Rates for the 25 largest Metropolitan Areas:

United States - 15.9%

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA - 16.6%
Baltimore-Towson, MD - 11.3%
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH - 10.7%
Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, IL-IN-WI - 14.5%

Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX - 15%
Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO - 12.7%
Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI - 17.4%
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX - 16.4%

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA - 17.6%
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL - 17.5%
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI - 10.7%
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA - 14.8%

Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL - 16.9%
Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD - 13.4%
Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, AZ - 17.4%
Pittsburgh, PA - 12.1%

Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA - 14%
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA - 19%
San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX - 17.3%
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA - 15%

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA - 11.9%
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA - 11.7%
St. Louis, MO-IL - 14.3%
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL - 16.4%
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV - 8.4%

I noticed that the L.A. area is not doing so well. It must be worse with the Riverside-San Bernardino metro around the corner.

Source: http://www.census.gov/prod/2013pubs/acsbr12-01.pdf
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Old 12-14-2013, 01:12 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,266 posts, read 6,346,948 times
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What sticks out for me is that that the highest metro are poverty rates (15% or more) are all in Sunbelt cities.

Does that mean that they're more poor people in the city proper of these Sunbelt areas, or that there are more affluent people in the suburbs elsewhere? I'd suspect the latter, because there certainly are a lot of poor folk in the big Midwest and Northeast cities.
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Old 12-14-2013, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Georgia
485 posts, read 731,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
2012 Poverty Rates for the 25 largest Metropolitan Areas:

United States - 15.9%

Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA - 16.6%
Baltimore-Towson, MD - 11.3%
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH - 10.7%
Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, IL-IN-WI - 14.5%

Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX - 15%
Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO - 12.7%
Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI - 17.4%
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX - 16.4%

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA - 17.6%
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL - 17.5%
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI - 10.7%
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA - 14.8%

Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL - 16.9%
Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD - 13.4%
Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, AZ - 17.4%
Pittsburgh, PA - 12.1%

Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA - 14%
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA - 19%
San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX - 17.3%
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA - 15%

San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA - 11.9%
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA - 11.7%
St. Louis, MO-IL - 14.3%
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL - 16.4%
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV - 8.4%

I noticed that the L.A. area is not doing so well. It must be worse with the Riverside-San Bernardino metro around the corner.

Source: http://www.census.gov/prod/2013pubs/acsbr12-01.pdf
No LA has been performing pretty poor economically in recent years. They are running out of land, water, jobs, and the city is deep in debt. Some drastic changes need to be made. And being near Riverside doesn't help any.
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Old 12-14-2013, 01:54 PM
 
1,422 posts, read 1,821,332 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
What sticks out for me is that that the highest metro are poverty rates (15% or more) are all in Sunbelt cities.

Does that mean that they're more poor people in the city proper of these Sunbelt areas, or that there are more affluent people in the suburbs elsewhere? I'd suspect the latter, because there certainly are a lot of poor folk in the big Midwest and Northeast cities.
One of the main problems is the fact that poverty is more spread out in the Sunbelt (and the South in general) areas. In the Northeast, Midwest, and even some areas in the West (Northwest), a lot of the poor folks are concentrated in one or few areas within city-limits. For example, I would think that many of the poor in the Milwaukee area end up within Milwaukee's lower-income neighbourhoods.
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Old 12-14-2013, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,762,908 times
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In % order if anyone is interested:

08.4% -- Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV
10.7% -- Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH
10.7% -- Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI
11.3% -- Baltimore-Towson, MD
11.7% -- Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA

11.9% -- San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA
12.1% -- Pittsburgh, PA
12.7% -- Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO
13.4% -- Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD
14.0% -- Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR

14.3% -- St. Louis, MO-IL
14.5% -- Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, IL-IN-WI
14.8% -- New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA
15.0% -- Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX
15.0% -- San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA

15.9% -- United States

16.4% -- Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX
16.4% -- Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL
16.6% -- Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA
16.9% -- Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL
17.3% -- San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX

17.4% -- Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI
17.4% -- Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, AZ
17.5% -- Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL
17.6% -- Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA
19.0% -- Riverside-San Bernardino, CA
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Old 12-14-2013, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Limbo
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Looks like Florida has some work to do.
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Old 12-14-2013, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,958 posts, read 3,819,250 times
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Wow, I had no idea Southen California was doing so poorly, literally. Can't imagine how much money is being spent on welfare and government assistance programs down there.

At least my hood Seattle is doing so well!
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Old 12-14-2013, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,627,221 times
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A lot of poverty in the booming sunbelt. I don't know if that has to do with lack of social services or a large immigrant population but I find it interesting.

I also find it interesting that places like Baltimore, Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis don't have higher poverty rates considering the lost of manufacturing hit these cities hard too. I guess it wasn't Detroit hard.
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Old 12-14-2013, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Georgia
485 posts, read 731,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
A lot of poverty in the booming sunbelt. I don't know if that has to do with lack of social services or a large immigrant population but I find it interesting.

I also find it interesting that places like Baltimore, Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis don't have higher poverty rates considering the lost of manufacturing hit these cities hard too. I guess it wasn't Detroit hard.
What I've noticed from the boom in the sunbelt is that it seems it is primarily benefitting the middle and upper classes. The south needs to do a better job of increasing economic opportunity across the board. And as far as southern California....I think is someone similar to Miami in that the land will always be valuable because of proximity to beach and/or mountains, which means even in a terrible economy the homes will be largely unaffordable.
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Old 12-15-2013, 03:57 PM
 
1,422 posts, read 1,821,332 times
Reputation: 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
A lot of poverty in the booming sunbelt. I don't know if that has to do with lack of social services or a large immigrant population but I find it interesting.

I also find it interesting that places like Baltimore, Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis don't have higher poverty rates considering the lost of manufacturing hit these cities hard too. I guess it wasn't Detroit hard.
I would think that many of those places have a variety of different economic sectors to fall back on (especially Chicago and Pittsburgh).
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