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Old 01-07-2014, 04:13 PM
 
3,533 posts, read 3,370,867 times
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The United States spends much more on health per capita than all other OECD countries, with spending of 8500 USD in 2011, two-and-a-half times greater than the OECD average (3322 USD) and 50% higher than Norway and Switzerland (the next biggest spending countries).

My personal take is that a large part of the health care spending went into corruptions and overly inflated doctors' pay checks compared to many other western euro countries.


Americans do not age well, at least according to the Organization for [COLOR=#668833 !important][COLOR=#668833 ! important]Economic[/color][/color] Cooperation and Development. In its “Health at a Glance 2013,” OECD experts report:
Life expectancy in the United States stood at 78.7 years in 2011: an increase of almost eight years since 1970, but significantly less than the ten year gain registered across OECD countries. Life expectancy is now more than a year below the OECD average of 80.1, compared to one year above the average in 1970. The gap between the United States and leading countries has also widened. For example, the life expectancy for U.S. men in 2011 was 4.2 years shorter than in Switzerland (up from less than 3 years in 1970); for U.S. women, it was 4.8 years shorter than in Japan in 2011 (while there was no gap in 1970).

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[COLOR=#668833 !important][COLOR=#668833 ! important]Healthcare
[/color] expenditures in the U.S. are largely a waste, at least compared with virtually all other OECD nations:
The United States spends much more on health per capita than all other OECD countries, with spending of 8500 USD in 2011, two-and-a-half times greater than the OECD average (3322 USD) and 50% higher than Norway and Switzerland (the next biggest spending countries). Higher health spending per capita tends to be associated with lower mortality rates and higher life expectancy, but this is not the case for the United States. Given its high level of health spending, the United States has relatively low life expectancy (five years less than what might be predicted by its health spending alone), although many other factors beyond health spending affect mortality and life expectancy.
Overweight Americans continue to put a massive burden on healthcare:




Read more: Life Expectancy in U.S. Rising Slower Than Elsewhere — OECD - 24/7 Wall St. Life Expectancy in U.S. Rising Slower Than Elsewhere — OECD - 24/7 Wall St.

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Old 01-07-2014, 04:26 PM
 
257 posts, read 538,740 times
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First of all, why is this in the New York City forum?

Second, my take is that the food industry's lobby is strongest in the US and therefore Americans are poisoned by the products of Kraft, General Mills, Coca Cola and the like more than elsewhere. Second, the health care system's raison d'ętre is profit, not making people healthy. While longer lifespans do benefit the bottom line of most of the player's in the system, sick people benefit them much more.
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Old 01-07-2014, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Bronx
16,256 posts, read 18,725,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psychopompos View Post
First of all, why is this in the New York City forum?

Second, my take is that the food industry's lobby is strongest in the US and therefore Americans are poisoned by the products of Kraft, General Mills, Coca Cola and the like more than elsewhere. Second, the health care system's raison d'ętre is profit, not making people healthy. While longer lifespans do benefit the bottom line of most of the player's in the system, sick people benefit them much more.
Lets not forget the Alcohol and Cigarette lobby is just as equally strong as Monsanto's food industry!
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Old 01-07-2014, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, NY
1,271 posts, read 2,683,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bronxguyanese View Post
Lets not forget the Alcohol and Cigarette lobby is just as equally strong as Monsanto's food industry!
The US has a lower smoking rate and a lower drinking rate than virtually every country in Europe. (Only the Nordic countries have lower smoking rates, and no European country has a lower drinking rate).

"Food industry" is a weak argument as well, though a harder one to rebut because it is more subtle. Do Americans eat more processed food than Europeans? Maybe. Certainly Americans are more obese, but that's not a new story.

The real issue is the high cost of healthcare, which has a number of causes. The unspoken one is the AMA's strategy of keeping medical school slots few and far between to pump up doctor salaries, though insurance company "skimming" and a ludicrously inefficient focus on hospitals and complex surgeries definitely play major roles as well.
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Old 01-07-2014, 08:18 PM
 
3,533 posts, read 3,370,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrownstoneNY View Post
The real issue is the high cost of healthcare, which has a number of causes. The unspoken one is the AMA's strategy of keeping medical school slots few and far between to pump up doctor salaries, though insurance company "skimming" and a ludicrously inefficient focus on hospitals and complex surgeries definitely play major roles as well.

The overall inflated physician salaries and the less efficient health care admin system in the US surely accounts for the more than 2x per capita health care expenses here at home. Shortage of doctors exists in many other developed euro countries as well, but their doctor salaries do not double or Nx that of other professions with similar levels of education/training.

One the other hand, the result of the comparison is not that meaningful. The US population is a mix containing all sorts of genetically/environmentally programmed long- or short-lived ethnic groups. On top of that, the disparity in both income and access to quality health care service vary greatly among different social classes. Whereas populations in countries like Swiz and Norge are genetically/culturally homogenous, and 99.9% of their citizens have access to standardized health care benefits. I am not surprise to see that the US lags behind those countries. A better way would be to sample the US middle or upper middle class for a fair comparison purpose.
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Old 01-09-2014, 09:33 AM
 
Location: New York City
8,277 posts, read 6,304,102 times
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Life expectancy will plateau shortly and start going down. There's just been way too much consumption of junk food & obesity in past 2-3 decades going around and at a lot of those people are gonna start dying off all at once
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Old 01-09-2014, 09:37 AM
 
Location: NYC
12,951 posts, read 8,779,148 times
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The US has a high rate of obesity and cancer rates. Then next in line for death is auto accidents.
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Old 01-09-2014, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Bronx, NY
9,845 posts, read 22,205,633 times
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Hmm I wonder why? May it have something to do with our health system?
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Old 01-09-2014, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,888 posts, read 10,402,608 times
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There is more money to be made in sick people. Americans consume more than 80% of the World's opioid pain pills, 99% of the World's hydrocodone and 70% of all Americans are on at least one prescription. The milligram prescribed per person has increased over 400% since 1997.

Presciption drug abuse has now surpassed auto accidents as the #1 cause of death in this country while simultaneously making Pharmaceuticals our nations most profitable industry and Healthcare CEO's our most highly compensated.
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Old 01-09-2014, 02:32 PM
 
693 posts, read 818,706 times
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1) Lack of a universal health care system

2) Obesity levels are among the highest in the world here

This only barely scratches the surface and there are a plethora of other reasons too, but I think these two are fundamental issues that need to be addressed in order to help us alleviate our "slacking" in this regard.
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