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Old 01-27-2014, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Aside from New England, of course. Cities like NY, Boston, Philly.etc seem dominated by Italians, Irish, Jews, blacks, Hispanics and others, yet these areas are associated a lot with colonial America. While I know the area received huge migration, most of which was not from the British Isles pretty early on, I wonder why the lack of British settlement in these cities? Did it have anything to do with the fact the US and Great Britain were sort of enemies for awhile? I find it funny that someone named 'Smith' in New York is most likely to be black, and a name like Goldstein or Rodriguez is probably more common.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:05 PM
 
Location: East coast
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A lot of people of colonial ancestry moved out a long time ago elsewhere. Cities tend to attract newer immigrants in general.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Aside from New England, of course. Cities like NY, Boston, Philly.etc seem dominated by Italians, Irish, Jews, blacks, Hispanics and others, yet these areas are associated a lot with colonial America. While I know the area received huge migration, most of which was not from the British Isles pretty early on, I wonder why the lack of British settlement in these cities? Did it have anything to do with the fact the US and Great Britain were sort of enemies for awhile? I find it funny that someone named 'Smith' in New York is most likely to be black, and a name like Goldstein or Rodriguez is probably more common.
The largest ethnic group in the US as a whole is German, not even British, btw.

I don't know for sure but my logical answer would be immigration. The port cities of the Northeast (Ellis Island in NY/NJ the biggest as in most well known and popular) were extremely popular amongst immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries, and it made sense for the people to stay in this area of larger, well known cities and metro regions rather than venture out into the country. There were already other immigrants around here, neighborhoods were made up of various groups (Little Italy's, Irish neighborhoods, etc), and more came in and fit right in. This area was just huge in immigration, because of its location especially. If the West and East Coasts of the US were reversed, CA, WA, and OR (especially, IMO, CA) would have the highest numbers of Italian Americans, I bet, rather than NY, NJ, CT, RI, etc, for example. The Northeast's popularity and location across the ocean from Europe meant a mix of people coming here during the height of immigration, and staying in this area because of convenience among other reasons.

Here's some numbers (and little explanations) a quick google search got me for ancestry groups in the US as of 2010, it's pretty interesting: The Largest Ancestry Groups In The United States - Business Insider

Last edited by JerseyGirl415; 01-27-2014 at 09:24 PM..
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:22 PM
 
Location: East coast
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Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I don't know for sure but my logical answer would be immigration. The port cities of the Northeast (Ellis Island in NY/NJ the biggest as in most well known and popular) were extremely popular amongst immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries, and it made sense for the people to stay in this area of larger, well known cities and metro regions rather than venture out into the country.
That's probably a major factor. The immigrants stayed in the cities where their communities had already been well established, where others of their familiar culture or heritage also lived, while those of colonial stock probably were more likely to leave for the countryside or other cities since they didn't really feel tied down to any community.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:24 PM
 
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Rural New England (Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine) are loaded with English descended from some of the original Puritans and others.

Its the urban/suburban areas that are more diverse.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
The largest ethnic group in the US as a whole is German, not even British, btw.

I don't know for sure but my logical answer would be immigration. The port cities of the Northeast (Ellis Island in NY/NJ the biggest as in most well known and popular) were extremely popular amongst immigrants in the 19th and 20th centuries, and it made sense for the people to stay in this area of larger, well known cities and metro regions rather than venture out into the country. There were already other immigrants around here, neighborhoods were made up of various groups (Little Italy's, Irish neighborhoods, etc), and more came in and fit right in. This area was just huge in immigration, because of its location especially. If the West and East Coasts of the US were reversed, CA, WA, and OR (especially, IMO, CA) would have the highest numbers of Italian Americans, I bet, rather than NY, NJ, CT, RI, etc, for example. The Northeast's popularity and location across the ocean from Europe meant a mix of people coming here during the height of immigration, and staying in this area because of convenience among other reasons.

Here's some numbers (and little explanations) a quick google search got me for ancestry groups in the US as of 2010, it's pretty interesting: The Largest Ancestry Groups In The United States - Business Insider
If you include all those who just refer to themselves as 'American', Scots-Irish and blacks, the British would be a larger group. British ancestry is often invisible in the US.

Since the US was founded by Brits, like Australia, I wonder why it hasn't become dominated by Brits and British culture like here. British ancestry is still very represented among the presidents and many elites in America though.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:42 PM
 
Location: East coast
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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Since the US was founded by Brits, like Australia, I wonder why it hasn't become dominated by Brits and British culture like here. British ancestry is still very represented among the presidents and many elites in America though.
Well, American identity started with breaking ties from the Brits, didn't it?

British-descended colonial stock Americans are farther removed from Britain in number of generations too, while Australia was settled by Brits mostly after the American Revolution and so are more recent settlers with continuous ties to the Empire.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:47 PM
 
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Most of Northern New England (ME/NH/VT), rural/exburban areas of Southern New England (CT/MA/RI), and pockets of Upstate NY are loaded with people of English ancestry, mostly descended from Colonial-era English immigrants.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
Well, American identity started with breaking ties from the Brits, didn't it?

British-descended colonial stock Americans are farther removed from Britain in number of generations too, while Australia was settled by Brits mostly after the American Revolution and so are more recent settlers with continuous ties to the Empire.
Well yes there was that. We retain ties with Britain to this day, and until recently the UK was the biggest source of immigrants along with New Zealand.
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Old 01-27-2014, 09:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
If you include all those who just refer to themselves as 'American', Scots-Irish and blacks, the British would be a larger group. British ancestry is often invisible in the US.

Since the US was founded by Brits, like Australia, I wonder why it hasn't become dominated by Brits and British culture like here. British ancestry is still very represented among the presidents and many elites in America though.
Well, the American revolutionaries were anti-British, really, that was the whole point of the Revolution. It makes sense that the US isn't more like Britain, culturally or anything, because that was kind of the idea.

Isn't Australia, as well as Canada and some other countries and islands, still technically under the British crown? Isn't the Queen the Queen of the UK and Australia, Canada, etc? Isn't her face on your money, and Canada's? Genuine questions here, I'm not mocking or anything. In the US, that would literally not be allowed because the founding fathers wanted nothing to do with any monarchy, ever, for the new nation. We don't recognize royalty here (well, we do for others, but obviously we have no royals). If a Prince or Princess of another nation is living in the US, you're really not a Prince or Princess anymore to us because we don't have that here.

Why would blacks be British-Americans (unless I misinterpreted that)? African Americans came here in large numbers during slavery from Africa, so many black Americans can trace their roots to slavery. Their ethnicities would be whatever African country their ancestors were brought, or voluntarily migrated in the event they weren't here originally as slaves, from.

"Americans" could either be American Indian or, as the link said, calling themselves Americans instead of recognizing ethnicity because to some Americans, their ethnicities are irrelevant and only their nationalities are. "Americans" aren't necessarily referring to themselves as so because they're British. If I'm not mistaken, ethnic identities aren't as strong in the South and some people there refer to themselves as American and only Americans in principle to prove a point. Could they be British? Sure. But I think in those cases, and many, the British ancestors are so far removed and were here for so long it no longer mattes, in a sense. The Northeast tends to have strong ethnic identities, notably Italian and Irish. I think the British Americans just don't have strong identities. IMO, the German Americans don't, either.

Maybe not the best source (while I like the DM it's a tabloid), this map is legit and I have seen it numerous other places: American ethnicity map shows melting pot of ethnicities that make up the USA today | Mail Online
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