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Old 12-04-2007, 06:20 PM
 
1,517 posts, read 4,605,621 times
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I love your post title! So great and it spells out exactly what I'd be looking for too. Agree with Chicago.
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Old 12-04-2007, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
864 posts, read 1,583,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nafster View Post
Why are looking for a fast paced city? It's rare to find a fast paced city that's actually friendly.
Blame it on my Type A personality, LOL. I've just always liked the hustle and bustle of the larger cities. You're right, though... it seems sometimes the faster the city, the less friendly the people.

Thanks, sweettea! Sounds like we see eye to eye

Last edited by downtownnola; 12-04-2007 at 09:06 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 12-07-2007, 12:30 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,746 posts, read 3,102,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chitownwarrior View Post
I'm sorry, i wouldn't consider st. louis very fast paced...friendly yes, but definately not fast paced. Medium-paced probably fits more, like baltimore.
That's because you're from Chicago, one of the most fast-paced cities in the U.S., so of course everything will seem slow-paced to you St. Louis, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh and Milwaukee and the Twin Cities all run at about the same rate, so if they have to be considered medium-paced, fine. I agree with the Baltimore grouping.
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Old 12-07-2007, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Highest county in the Virginia hills
129 posts, read 300,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
...it seems we get so hung up on this notion of "fast paced" without really defining what that means?

If its based on heavy traffic, well just about every city has that.

If we're talking about vibrant downtown streets, well, only a handful really qualify there.
I don't think either of those things has anything to do with "pace."

Traffic (by which I assume you mean motor traffic) can be heavy, fast and hectic; or it can simply be thick, but relaxed, because a lot of people are participating in the life of the city. Same for vibrant downtown streets, which I take to mean pedestrian life. A fast city can be bustling, or it can be rather dead; try visiting a "financial district" at the wrong time of day and it will be very desolate, but anyone you do run across will still be in a fast mindset. Similarly, slow can be sleepy, or it can be full of life, but relaxed.

On the other hand, I do think there's a relationship between pace and friendliness. In general, the faster the pace, the less friendly.

In Praise Of Slow - Carl Honoré (http://www.inpraiseofslow.com/slow/index.php - broken link)
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Old 12-07-2007, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland
24,787 posts, read 30,939,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spark240 View Post
I don't think either of those things has anything to do with "pace."

Traffic (by which I assume you mean motor traffic) can be heavy, fast and hectic; or it can simply be thick, but relaxed, because a lot of people are participating in the life of the city. Same for vibrant downtown streets, which I take to mean pedestrian life. A fast city can be bustling, or it can be rather dead; try visiting a "financial district" at the wrong time of day and it will be very desolate, but anyone you do run across will still be in a fast mindset. Similarly, slow can be sleepy, or it can be full of life, but relaxed.

On the other hand, I do think there's a relationship between pace and friendliness. In general, the faster the pace, the less friendly.

In Praise Of Slow - Carl Honoré (http://www.inpraiseofslow.com/slow/index.php - broken link)
I dont think its so complex and I do think its based more on what is physically apparent and not so much a mindset-because Im sure there are more cut throat people in suburban office parks than in Downtowns and we wouldnt characterize those places as "fast paced" in the least.

Personally,
I would rely on what I see as far as vibrancy at street level. If a Financial District dies down at the end of the day, then that means the vibrancy has migrated to the neighborhoods-not that the city itself ceases to be fast paced.

Sadly,
Most american cities are dead in their downtowns as well as in their neighborhoods anytime of day and this is not some odd characteristic of sunbelt cities-plenty of eastern cities look like evacuation zones all the time.
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Old 12-07-2007, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Highest county in the Virginia hills
129 posts, read 300,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Sadly,
Most american cities are dead in their downtowns as well as in their neighborhoods anytime of day and this is not some odd characteristic of sunbelt cities-plenty of eastern cities look like evacuation zones all the time.
Oh, absolutely!

The life of the city and its absence are created primarily by design. Single-use districts, created by excessive, broad-stroke zoning, are what primarily create the dead zones.

I just think that's a separate issue from the "pace" culture of a given metro area.

If you're on Wall Street, NYC, hours after the close of "business," the place is a wasteland. No life. Yet, when you DO run into someone (probably a cop), his attitude will retain every bit of the NYC "pace."

Fortunately for New York, many neighborhoods and areas of the city are still thoroughly mixed-use, and that's why much of the city remains living most of the time.

Last edited by spark240; 12-07-2007 at 12:08 PM..
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Old 12-07-2007, 02:02 PM
 
2,671 posts, read 5,468,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by downtown1 View Post
Are you sure that LA is a fast-paced city?
L.A. is pretty fast paced compared to San Diego, but it's still laid-back especially for being the 2nd largest city in the United States. I would say that L.A. and New York are friendly fast paced cities.
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Old 12-07-2007, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Scarsdale, NY
2,775 posts, read 8,388,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Compared to the East Coast?

The only city back there that seems faster than LA is NYC..all the others, nope.

Not to belittle the east coast, but it seems we get so hung up on this notion of "fast paced" without really defining what that means?

If its based on heavy traffic, well just about every city has that.

If we're talking about vibrant downtown streets, well, only a handful really qualify there.
Chicago and Boston.
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Old 12-07-2007, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Scarsdale, NY
2,775 posts, read 8,388,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodgirl49 View Post
L.A.'s freeways and traffic make it seem like a fast paced city, but people seem more mellow and slowed down compared to the east coast.
Are you so sure? The traffic seems more slow-paced than fast-paced to me.

Yes, I agree with the more mellow lifestyle that LA has. The whole West Coast is a slower-paced lifestyle.

New Orleans, Boston, NYC, Chicago, and DC are all more fast-paced than LA. A lot of it has to do with the pedestrain acitivity, NOT CARS.
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Old 12-07-2007, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Scarsdale, NY
2,775 posts, read 8,388,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
That's because you're from Chicago, one of the most fast-paced cities in the U.S., so of course everything will seem slow-paced to you St. Louis, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Pittsburgh and Milwaukee and the Twin Cities all run at about the same rate, so if they have to be considered medium-paced, fine. I agree with the Baltimore grouping.
Exactly, therefore it is a slow-paced city.

Even if you're from Middleofnowhere, Kansas, St. Louis may be considered fast-paced, but once you get to New York or Chicago, St. Louis will be as dead as a corpse.
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