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Old 12-10-2007, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 183,070 times
Reputation: 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
I just was on Google Earth, and the highest elevation I found for Pittsburgh was 1250 feet. The lowest is about 700 ft. at the Point. So there are no 1000 foot hills; the highest would be about 550 feet.
I worded it wrong.
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Old 12-10-2007, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 183,070 times
Reputation: 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwright1 View Post
I would definately choose Pittsburgh. IMO it's architecturally the most beautiful. Love the hills, the compact size, its downtown is pretty cool, great parks, beautiful old homes and is the most walkable. San Antonio has nice parts but it has that typical Texas city sprawl and the summer heat and humidity is totally unbearable. Second choice would be a coin toss.
Typical Texas city sprawl? Never heard of that before. Pittsburgh sprawls, too.
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Old 12-10-2007, 08:07 AM
Status: "Fall is in the air-too soon!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
68,682 posts, read 57,401,479 times
Reputation: 19454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guerilla View Post
Typical Texas city sprawl? Never heard of that before. Pittsburgh sprawls, too.
Pittsburgh sprawls, yes, especially up north. It is not as sprawly as some other cities because of its negative population growth.
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Old 12-11-2007, 01:31 PM
 
Location: California
3,642 posts, read 2,856,266 times
Reputation: 2628
Default Pittsburgh

[SIZE=2]Pittsburgh Top Vacation Spot? Respected Travel Magazine Thinks So[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Many residents say Pittsburgh is a beautiful city, but did you know it's ranked amongst the top vacation destinations?[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Pittsburgh Top Vacation Spot? Respected Travel Magazine Thinks So - News - MSNBC.com (broken link)[/SIZE]
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Old 12-11-2007, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,092 posts, read 45,383,548 times
Reputation: 10979
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Pittsburgh sprawls, yes, especially up north. It is not as sprawly as some other cities because of its negative population growth.
Isn't it a shame though that cities that are in steep population decline are simultaneously devouring more open space for tract housing, big-box stores, etc.? I can see the need for new infrastructure in rapidly-growing areas like Denver, Phoenix, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc., but my own home area of Scranton/Wilkes-Barre grew its land usage area by 20 square miles from 1970-1990 while it had declined tens of thousands in population. Now that we've begun to grow again in the past few years, I cringe to think about just how much worse our sprawl problems will become. Likewise with Pittsburgh, if the entire metropolitan area is in decline, why the need for sprawl? It just seems downright stupid and socially-irresponsible for folks to be building new housing and big-box stores there at a time when housing vacancy rates continue to rise closer to the city.
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Old 12-11-2007, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,402 posts, read 17,454,331 times
Reputation: 18794
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
It just seems downright stupid and socially-irresponsible for folks to be building new housing and big-box stores there at a time when housing vacancy rates continue to rise closer to the city.
Hey SWB, one thing I've wondered whenever you post is just how many vacant sfrs are in Scranton, and also how many new sfrs are built each year in the surrounding suburban area.

Say you had a magic wand and could pass a law forbidding any new construction and REQUIRING all new residents to buy a "used" house. Would you have places to put all the people?
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Old 12-11-2007, 08:12 PM
Status: "Fall is in the air-too soon!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
68,682 posts, read 57,401,479 times
Reputation: 19454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerby W-R View Post
[SIZE=2]Pittsburgh Top Vacation Spot? Respected Travel Magazine Thinks So[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Many residents say Pittsburgh is a beautiful city, but did you know it's ranked amongst the top vacation destinations?[/SIZE]
[SIZE=2]Pittsburgh Top Vacation Spot? Respected Travel Magazine Thinks So - News - MSNBC.com (broken link)[/SIZE]
I read the article. Here is a quote: But what seems to have really impressed Frommer's is the way the city has reinvented itself.

"Swapped out its rusting blast furnaces for a modern cityscape with a thriving local and international arts scene," the magazine said.

Frommer's specifically mentions Pittsburgh's four Carnegie museums, including the Museum of Natural History.


Actually, the museums were there along with the blast furnaces. Andrew Carnegie built the buildings. He also built some steel mills. Sort of gives you a lot of faith in travel writers, doesn't it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Hey SWB, one thing I've wondered whenever you post is just how many vacant sfrs are in Scranton, and also how many new sfrs are built each year in the surrounding suburban area.

Say you had a magic wand and could pass a law forbidding any new construction and REQUIRING all new residents to buy a "used" house. Would you have places to put all the people?
In Pittsburgh, yes. The city population has dropped more than 50% from its peak. The metro population drops every year. In my hometown in the Pgh area (Beaver Falls) 1 in 9 houses is vacant. I don't know about Scranton.
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Old 12-11-2007, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,092 posts, read 45,383,548 times
Reputation: 10979
Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Hey SWB, one thing I've wondered whenever you post is just how many vacant sfrs are in Scranton, and also how many new sfrs are built each year in the surrounding suburban area.

Say you had a magic wand and could pass a law forbidding any new construction and REQUIRING all new residents to buy a "used" house. Would you have places to put all the people?
Most definitely. People can call me a fascist or communist all they'd like, but I see no benefit in what is happening to our once-pristine landscape in my metropolitan area. Scranton has a major regional two-story downtown shopping center known as the Mall at Steamtown. Just outside the city limits, a new "lifestyle center" known as the Shoppes @ Montage has just been developed, and it has now succeeded in luring several stores out of Scranton's downtown mall and into this suburban wasteland adjacent to I-81. Isn't it funny how developers and shoppers are now being drawn to these artificial "lifestyle centers" when all they do is replicate the exact same traditional downtowns that have been decimated in the first place because these same pro-sprawl lemmings can't live without their suburban Cheesecake Factory and Talbots?

Downtown Scranton is faring the best out of any downtown in our region in terms of retail growth, as it is now redefining itself with a lot of upscale niche retailers like a gourmet dog bakery, womens' apparel stores, espresso bars, jewelers, used book store, etc. Nevertheless, I'd estimate a good 1/4 of the storefronts downtown are sitting vacant at a time when our suburban shopping districts are bumper-to-bumper in terms of traffic. Thus far I've done 75% of my shopping in Downtown Scranton, and I must say I'm glad I did. I enjoyed chatting with some of the new merchants, as they share my idealistic views for the days when sprawl in Scranton finally becomes taboo and folks learn to appreciate the beauty in historic walkable neighborhoods again.

Here's a few images to show that the retail sector in Downtown Scranton has indeed been able to hold its ground despite the presence of major retail chain areas on both its north and south sides...









Once again though a distinction must be made between "good" suburbs and "bad" suburbs. PittNurse70 and I butted heads about this very same issue for quite some time. She lives in suburban Denver, an area where the growth of the suburbs is not having a severe impact upon redevelopment of the downtown, which is likewise growing. I live in suburban Scranton (not by choice), and I can see how our tract-housing, big-box stores, lifestyle centers, etc. are draining the economic vitality right out of Scranton. It's sad to see so many historic buildings just sitting and rotting as the city's residential population nosedives due to the sprawl here while the suburban lemmings hop in their Hummers and leave their cul-de-sacs bound for a Christmas shopping season where not even one local merchant, or mom-and-pop if you will, will see a dime from them. Clarks Summit, PA is the perfect example of this arrogance. This suburb is the most posh in our region and is filled with a very intellectual populace. You'd think a great independent book store/cafe would thrive in its downtown, right? Wrong. The lemmings shunned it to head to the nearby Borders, causing it to go out of business. The same could be said for a mom-and-pop hobby shop downtown. Once again these lemmings preferred Lowe's and Home Depot, even though they lived just down the street from these small multi-generational businesses that are now defunct.

I know people get angry when I use the word "lemming," but I suppose the truth just hurts sometimes, doesn't it? The autocentric society of the present is disgusting in relation to the walkable Main Street type of cozy atmosphere we've nearly eradicated from the entirety of this nation. Once vibrant Main Streets are now crumbling, such as this one in my hometown of Pittston...








...where the days of mom-and-pop have long gone by the wayside. Meanwhile, more of our precious open space on the outer fringes of town continues to be devoured for big-box stores, housing developments, etc. It just seems so wasteful to me for so much land to be developed while entire towns are rotting to the core like this, and I can't for the life of me understand why nobody agrees.
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Old 12-11-2007, 10:53 PM
 
9,941 posts, read 8,497,303 times
Reputation: 4319
Quote:
ScrantonWilkesBarre;2230670] these same pro-sprawl lemmings can't live without their suburban Cheesecake Factory and Talbots? :rolleyes
:

Quote:
they share my idealistic views for the days when sprawl in Scranton finally becomes taboo and folks learn to appreciate the beauty in historic walkable neighborhoods again.
.
Quote:
Once again these lemmings preferred Lowe's and Home Depot,
Quote:
I know people get angry when I use the word "lemming," but I suppose the truth just hurts sometimes, doesn't it?
Quote:
, and I can't for the life of me understand why nobody agrees.
[/quote]

Some do, and some don't agree with you. You won't get many to even consider your point of view, though, when you refer to people as "lemmings" because they don't desire a "cozy, walkable, mom 'n pop retailers" type of place to settle and raise a family.

You seem to make it clear that it's either your way or no way and if it takes the power of the gov't to force your vision of social utopia on everyone else, then so be it. It's for everyone's betterment.

My family and I will decide for ourselves on whether to live on 1/2, 2, 5 or 50 acres in any size house we can afford and enjoy, as far away from a dowtown as we please.

Please, enough with the name calling and condescension. It's not befitting an intellectual.

Last edited by doc1; 12-11-2007 at 11:04 PM..
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Old 12-11-2007, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
26,092 posts, read 45,383,548 times
Reputation: 10979
Quote:
Originally Posted by doc1 View Post
:



.


They don't have to agree with you. You won't get many to even consider your point of view when you refer to people as "lemmings" because they don't desire a "cozy, walkable, mom 'n pop retailers type of place to settle and raise a family.

You seem to make it clear that it's either your way or no way and if it takes the power of the gov't to force your utopia on everyone else, then so e it. It's for everyone's betterment.[/quote]

How would YOU account for those last images I showed of my hometown's main drag? Do you not see a waste in land by permitting entire cities in PA to rot to the core while vast swaths of forest and farm lands are downed each and every year for tract housing and big-box stores? There's already a Wal-Mart store within a 10-minute drive of just about everyone in our metropolitan area, yet they're still planning on building four or five more just to promote even more sprawl around it and exacerbate matters even further.

"Lemming" might not be an attractive word to use, but hopefully it will force middle-aged Americans to reflect upon just how you've all RUINED our nation for my generation. Now we've become an autocentric society at a time when fuel prices in my area are hovering around $3.20/gallon. As gas prices continue to rise, just what will become of these never-ending sprawling exurbs? There once was a time when folks lived within reasonable walking distance to their workplaces, grocery stores, banks, pharmacies, book stores, parks, theaters, etc. Now the vast majority of the nation lives on sidewalkless streets isolated from playgrounds so that their children can't even play outside. How is that at all a GOOD thing for our nation?

Yes, it IS for everyone's betterment if we stop squandering our scarce resources and ruining our environment in order to build progressively larger and larger McMansions with larger carbon foot prints miles away from civilization just to "show off" to our colleagues. Who needs a 5-bedroom, 4.5-bath, 4,000 square foot McMansion for their one child anyways? Yes, it IS for everyone's betterment if folks didn't just say "whatever" when independent merchants collapse left and right so that eventually the only choice we'll have is between Wal-Mart and Target, Home Depot or Lowe's, Best Buy or Circuit City, etc. with no mom-and-pop alternatives to make different communities unique in character and appearance from one another. Yes, it IS for everyone's betterment if people stopped moving to the exurbs only to whine "Ahhhh!! Kill it! Kill it!" when they see animals in their yards, which were once natural habitats until they decided that they were "too good" to move into one of the hundreds of thousands of EXISTING homes on the market in this nation. Yes, it IS for everyone's benefit of people stop having the ignorant attitude of "I have the money to fill up the gas tank of my Hummer, so I'll drive it wherever I want; butt out." If that is the case, then why are those of us who drive fuel-efficient vehicles ALSO feeling the pinch at the pumps due to "high demand" in relation to a dwindling supply? Should SUV drivers be paying me the difference in cost that THEIR "freedom to choose" costs me financially?

What in God's name is going to happen to this nation's autocentric communities when China and other developing nations use up the global supply of gasoline much more rapidly than we ever could have imagined? What is President Bush's contingency plan to account for this, other than to invade Iran? How much have our politicians devoted towards developing alternative fuels as opposed to war-mongering, anyways? I'm tired of hearing exurban SUV owners whining about high fuel prices when they're the very same ones driving up demand by driving so far each way to access every amenity imaginable. Since when did sidewalks grow cooties, anyways?
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