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Old 03-29-2014, 09:01 PM
 
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Philly and New York City have pretty mushy winters with as much rain as snow, and their summers are nearly as hot as down South just not as long in duration. Even states like Mississippi and Alabama regularly dip down below 20F in the winter on certain mornings. Virtually anything north of Florida experiences colder winter lows than Canada's west coast!

I think - with the exception of Florida and the Northwoods of northern Minnesota/Michigan/upstate NY/Vermont/Maine - the South, Northeast and Midwest more or less are the same Humid Continental climate type. Georgia's landscape more or less looks the same as that of Ohio just more wooded due to less deforestation. The main differences are that winter is longer and summer is shorter the further north you go.
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Old 03-29-2014, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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I'll disagree. While North Georgia does indeed have cold winters, you can't compare the number of sub-freezing and snow / ice days to those experienced by the north. In vast regions of the northern states, ice and snow are on the ground from December through late March. In the South, though it might be 10 degrees with snow one day, the next might be 60 with bright sunshine.

That said, the eastern seaboard DOES have very similar weather patterns. This winter notwithstanding, the weather in Atlanta, DC and NYC are remarkably similar.
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Old 03-30-2014, 12:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
I'll disagree. While North Georgia does indeed have cold winters, you can't compare the number of sub-freezing and snow / ice days to those experienced by the north. In vast regions of the northern states, ice and snow are on the ground from December through late March. In the South, though it might be 10 degrees with snow one day, the next might be 60 with bright sunshine.

That said, the eastern seaboard DOES have very similar weather patterns. This winter notwithstanding, the weather in Atlanta, DC and NYC are remarkably similar.
Even the ice and snow on the ground aspect in the North can and will vary depending on where and the year.
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Old 03-30-2014, 12:43 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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I used to live in Michigan, and currently live in Tennessee. Yes the climates are very different, the upper Midwest has a cool pleasant summer and a long brutal winter with wild transition seasons. The upper south has mild winters, beautiful transition seasons and a longer hotter summer. It is not uncommon in the winter here to be 60 degrees, in the upper Midwest that is unthinkable. Snow stays on the ground for months up there, here if it snows its gone in a day or two. Cold weather never stays like it does in the north. Now I cant speak for the northeast, I know much of it is milder in the winter due to ocean moderation.
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Old 03-30-2014, 01:09 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I used to live in Michigan, and currently live in Tennessee. Yes the climates are very different, the upper Midwest has a cool pleasant summer and a long brutal winter with wild transition seasons. The upper south has mild winters, beautiful transition seasons and a longer hotter summer. It is not uncommon in the winter here to be 60 degrees, in the upper Midwest that is unthinkable. Snow stays on the ground for months up there, here if it snows its gone in a day or two. Cold weather never stays like it does in the north. Now I cant speak for the northeast, I know much of it is milder in the winter due to ocean moderation.
Good observations. Something else I pondered recently, in reaction to a thread about whether people moved north or west for weather reasons, is the fact that WARMTH is FAR FAR more acceptable than cold. Despite all the hate *some* people have for the warm, humid summers of the South, the fact remains that EVERY region of the Eastern North has periods of summer weather that are just as brutal. Granted, they may only last a few days or weeks, but still and again ... it gets just as hot UP NORTH as it does DOWN SOUTH.

Now, that said, I will add this: Heat is far more tolerable than cold. Even in the deepest throws of summer, it's generally cool and pleasant at night in the South. Even in the DEEP SOUTH and coastal regions (i.e. Florida, the Atlantic and Gulf coasts), the nighttime temps are rather pleasant -- with some exceptions when humidity is extremely high. But the exceptions are not the norm.

BOTTOM LINE: It is much easier to deal with HEAT than it is with COLD, at least IMO. Just consider the historic inflruence that air conditioning had on the Sunbelt boom.
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Old 03-30-2014, 01:30 AM
 
56,546 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Good observations. Something else I pondered recently, in reaction to a thread about whether people moved north or west for weather reasons, is the fact that WARMTH is FAR FAR more acceptable than cold. Despite all the hate *some* people have for the warm, humid summers of the South, the fact remains that EVERY region of the Eastern North has periods of summer weather that are just as brutal. Granted, they may only last a few days or weeks, but still and again ... it gets just as hot UP NORTH as it does DOWN SOUTH.

Now, that said, I will add this: Heat is far more tolerable than cold. Even in the deepest throws of summer, it's generally cool and pleasant at night in the South. Even in the DEEP SOUTH and coastal regions (i.e. Florida, the Atlantic and Gulf coasts), the nighttime temps are rather pleasant -- with some exceptions when humidity is extremely high. But the exceptions are not the norm.

BOTTOM LINE: It is much easier to deal with HEAT than it is with COLD, at least IMO. Just consider the historic inflruence that air conditioning had on the Sunbelt boom.
The dealing with the heat vs cold thing is debateable, as some will say that you can add layers of clothing in order to stay warm when it is cold while if it is too hot, then you can only go so far. Having been in both, you will have to adjust accordingly.

Also, it CAN get as hot in the North, but the degree of humidity and the time period will not be as long, generally. It isn't too common for Northern areas to hit 100, whereas it is more common in much of the South.

Even with the crazy winter, there were days earlier in the season where it was well above freezing and the snow is pretty much gone in much, if not most of the North already.
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Old 03-30-2014, 02:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
The dealing with the heat vs cold thing is debateable, as some will say that you can add layers of clothing in order to stay warm when it is cold while if it is too hot, then you can only go so far. Having been in both, you will have to adjust accordingly.

Also, it CAN get as hot in the North, but the degree of humidity and the time period will not be as long, generally. It isn't too common for Northern areas to hit 100, whereas it is more common in much of the South.

Even with the crazy winter, there were days earlier in the season where it was well above freezing and the snow is pretty much gone in much, if not most of the North already.
Even a fairly coolish summer can be quite miserable without air conditioning, in my opinion. Mostly because it gets so hot inside. I find putting on a jacket far less annoying than not being able to sleep.
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:11 AM
 
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New York can get very sticky & gross in the summer time, although this is very indicative of the East Coast in general. Miami is a killer too b/c they have the heat AND humidity. I much prefer a dry heat.
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:29 AM
 
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Try growing peaches in Michigan.
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Old 03-30-2014, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
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Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
Try growing peaches in Michigan.
LOL, there are several peach orchards in Michigan! Here is a link to just one, and I'm only posting it for proof so that I don't get a bunch of "you don't know what you're talking about" responses:


HANULCIK FARM MARKET

There are several others. I can think of at least four or five just within a twenty-five mile radius of my home in southern Michigan. There are also magnolias and rhododendrons that grow in our climate.

Actually, it really does get hot here. I mean, really, really hot, as in, 95 degrees for several days at a stretch. Honest, it does. We have heat advisories, old people who are at risk of heat stroke because they don't have air conditioning are taken to local senior centers, and the pavement gets too hot to walk on in bare feet. When that happens, the snow even melts, lol.

Last edited by canudigit; 03-30-2014 at 08:39 AM..
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