U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-07-2014, 07:21 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Areas that are heavily grazed by cattle are not wild, for example, even thought the human population in the area may be very small.

On the other side of the coin, there are places that over a large area have a relatively high human population, but much of the land in between is essentially left to nature. These areas are, relatively speaking, wild.
New England is a good example of relatively high population density plus lots of land uncultivated. It's still too near populated towns to be feel truly wild. But it's wilder than many low density parts of the midwest.

The western US, of course, has spots that far wilder than anything in the Northeast. Though northern Maine and the Adirondacks might approach some western mountain areas in wildness.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-07-2014, 07:29 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by LRUA View Post
Northern New Hampshire

Rugged White Mtns.

Very few towns, no cities.
Not at all. At the foot of the northern Presidential is the town of Gorham (3000 people). Ten miles away is Berlin with 10,000 people. At most summits in the Whites you can see some, though sometimes faint, evidence of humans (structures in the distance, etc.) Many western mountains are nowhere near as close to populated areas, deep within national forests. For example, take a look at the North Cascades. Or sections of the Northern Rockies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2014, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,737,758 times
Reputation: 946
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
New England is a good example of relatively high population density plus lots of land uncultivated. It's still too near populated towns to be feel truly wild. But it's wilder than many low density parts of the midwest.

The western US, of course, has spots that far wilder than anything in the Northeast. Though northern Maine and the Adirondacks might approach some western mountain areas in wildness.
The northwoods of MN/WI/MI (which is in the Midwest) is an area larger than New England, and generally more wild as well outside of the Maine northwoods; and many areas (Voyageurs, Huron Mountains, etc.) can easily be compared to that. It's funny how monolithic people who have never been here consider "The Midwest," which is an absolutely giant region of the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2014, 10:09 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
Of course, people don't think of the Adirondacks or the Great North Woods when they hear "Northeast" either
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2014, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,737,758 times
Reputation: 946
Agreed, both areas have far more wilderness than the rest of the country seems to give them credit for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2014, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,179 posts, read 3,847,632 times
Reputation: 2478
Northern Minnesota is pretty wild. Very sparsely populated, lots of forests, not much farm land.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2014, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,737,758 times
Reputation: 946
Farmland barely exists in the MN/WI/MI northern forests, due to growing season (it's an elevated plateau in an already-cold climate), soil, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2014, 01:18 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,941,028 times
Reputation: 1858
Drove through the Sand Hills in Nebraska a while ago, the lack of anything at all was literally amazing.

At the bottom of every small valley there were wetlands/lakes, I swear I saw millions of migratory birds on that drive.

It seemed so unspoiled.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2014, 11:27 AM
 
605 posts, read 1,235,386 times
Reputation: 615
Easily huge swaths Nevada, Eastern Oregon, Idaho, NW Montana, North Cascades of WA etc...

I know that New England has some sparesley populated areas. But those areas are pretty tiny compared to some of the more remote places in the intermountain west.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2014, 01:39 PM
 
2,729 posts, read 5,150,628 times
Reputation: 1938
Quote:
Originally Posted by TohobitPeak View Post
Central Idaho, the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness in addition to the thousands of acres of de facto wilderness that surrounds it, all comprising the largest roadless forested mountain area in the lower 48 and is the last intact forest ecosystem in the lower 48.
Idaho also has thousands of acres of other designated Wilderness areas spreading from the south to the north of the state and the most miles of whitewater rivers in the lower 48.

Salmon are spawned in Idaho, swim to the Pacific and then swim all the way back into the beautiful mountains of Idaho to die.


enough said.
This. I cannot say how many times I hear or read time and time again that the massive wilderness of Idaho is the wildest and the most remote mountain area(s) in the continental USA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top