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Old 05-28-2014, 06:10 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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Wilmington has some in its historic district.
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:03 AM
 
Location: N E B R A S K A
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I feel like people get caught up on rowhouses and whether or not they are indicative of a certain culture of not. Rowhouses are a better indicator of how old or historic an area is. Old areas in Savannah have row houses, Richmond has rowhouses, Wilmington, NC has row houses, Philadelphia has row houses....it's a byproduct of the age of the cities...not a culture reference to the cities themselves.
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Rowhouses were done just about everywhere in colonial times, but they fell out of favor in different parts of the country in different times in the 19th century (only lasting into the 20th century really in Philly, Baltimore, and DC). North Carolina didn't even have a medium-sized early 19th century city (similar to Charleston and Savannah) and thus didn't have big groups of rowhouses. In addition, urban renewal/downtown expansion has basically leveled the old residential cores of most North Carolina cities, so relatively little which was built before 1900 survives in general. Much of what does is southern style shotgun houses, which were the southern equivalent of rowhouses.

Wilmington does indeed have some, but not many. Here is one row. Here is another. The vast majority of the housing stock is the detached wood frame typical of old southern cities. And quite honestly, in hot climates, attached brick housing wouldn't be a great choice - particularly before air conditioning.
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Old 05-28-2014, 09:24 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Rowhouses were done just about everywhere in colonial times, but they fell out of favor in different parts of the country in different times in the 19th century (only lasting into the 20th century really in Philly, Baltimore, and DC).
NYC built many rowhouses in the early 20th century even if they weren't the default housing stock:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7178...oPktCVVj3g!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ca...0473995a9db666

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ba...851da81eed6ca8

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7232...Atrj1zohug!2e0
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Old 05-28-2014, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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I stand corrected. Although NYC had mostly moved to semi-attached during the time period those went up.

The 1950s rowhouses you see in parts of Philly and Baltimore are really a unique eyesore though.
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:15 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I stand corrected. Although NYC had mostly moved to semi-attached during the time period those went up.
That's probably true. NYC is large, so it has a bit of everything. Still, Chicago didn't have anything similar in the first half of the 20th century. As outer neighborhoods, the equivalent of most of my examples would be Chicago bungalow neighborhoods.Don't have numbers, but I suspect large (~5 story) apartment buildings were equally common in the first half of the 20th century:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ba...a45198ea4d73d6

that example might be on the older side, but Queens definitely had a lot of mid-rise apartment building infill in the mid 20th century. Philly also built a lot of semi-attached in the first half of the 20th century.

Quote:
The 1950s rowhouses you see in parts of Philly and Baltimore are really a unique eyesore though.
Montreal might have similar. Montreal kept building row houses at least as late as Philly, and in 1950 both cities were very similar density-wise, with Montreal slightly denser but smaller. These NYC row houses in an exclusive community are a unique non-eyesore:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Fo...13fa428b2ab9ea

Picture quality is terrible.
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:54 AM
 
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An awful lot of condos were built in the rowhouse style starting in the 1980's. I guess the difference is they front on a parking lot rather than a road.
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Old 05-28-2014, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Yep, row houses are pretty much the norm in Savannah's Historic District. And they're of many different styles, too!

http://www.front-porch-ideas-and-mor...-georgia-8.jpg
https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6086/6...fd5b652d_z.jpg
http://www.journeysinlightphotoblog....oorways-12.jpg
Outside of historic districts, you really don't see a lot of row-house neighborhoods in southern cities outside the Mid-Atlantic region.
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:18 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Wilmington has some in its historic district.
Well, by golly, you are right!

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.2388...KPYafLMCyA!2e0
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Old 05-29-2014, 05:46 PM
 
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Is that the only row in Wilmington?
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