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Old 06-12-2014, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Does such a major city exist anywhere in the United States….or not:

1. it has to be the largest city in its state with the largest metropolitan area

2. the entire state is within its urban pull: in other words, there can't be any other city (in state or outside) that any part of the state reaches out to. (thus a city like Chicago would be eliminated since part of IL is drawn to StL)

3. the rest of the state has to actually like the city, considers it its own city, cheers for its sports teams, etc., virtually seeing itself as a hinterland.

4. the city/metro area must dominate the politics of the state
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Old 06-12-2014, 02:55 PM
 
Location: New England
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number 3 makes it tough. Almost every 'hinterland' area has some degree of animosity towards the big city.

Boston comes close. Western Mass likes to complain about Boston dominating the state politically, but they still generally like Boston sports teams and go to Boston as the nearest big city. The Pioneer Valley is pretty independent and Springfield is pretty connected to Hartford, but that is more of a relationship of equals. When looking to a larger city, I think Boston beats out NYC. Most people I know from the Springfield area come to Boston if they want something that only big cities offer.

However, the Berkshires are something of a border region with NYC. Although most residents like Boston teams, NYC is just as close and they are as likely, if not more likely, to view NYC as the big city. Plus, a ton of New Yorkers go to the Berkshires for vacation.

Some other considerations:

Twin Cities?
SLC? Is SW Utah more in Las Vegas' orbit?
Atlanta?
Providence?

I still say liking the city makes it tough.
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Old 06-12-2014, 03:22 PM
 
Location: New York NY
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I would say Atlanta, but there are plenty of people in Georgia that consider Atllanta a foreign country.
I might also say Denver, but I don't know how people outside Denver feel about that city. The same for Minneapolis.
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Old 06-12-2014, 03:31 PM
 
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Outside of #3, this basically describes Seattle.

The population distribution is such that it becomes mathematically difficult - if not impossible - for a statewide voter referendum to pass if Seattle is not on board. That influences how things are done in Washington: most things are done in the state legislature, where every county has equal representation.

Even the fight against the $15/hr referendum is influenced by this mathematical fact: opponents are not hopeful that a statewide vote will pass because the referendum polls VERY strongly in Seattle (and some other nearby cities stand to benefit from the referendum passing). Hence the federal lawsuit that was filed, despite the fact that it is unlikely that the courts will intervene.
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Old 06-12-2014, 04:55 PM
 
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I think there will always be that love/hate relationship between the major theme city in a state and the outstate residents. Even then those residents still tend to root for the instate teams no matter how much resentment. It's hard to say because you can make arguements for and against "key holders".
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Old 06-12-2014, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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I think Portland fits better than Seattle - eastern Washington has Spokane, and there's no comparable city in eastern Oregon. I think there are some towns on the Idaho border that have ties to Boise but I don't know that area well.
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Old 06-12-2014, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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I'd have to say Boston is by far the best example.

2 not mentioned: Honolulu, SLC
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Old 06-12-2014, 05:25 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Honolulu.
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Old 06-12-2014, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amaiunmei View Post
Outside of #3, this basically describes Seattle.

The population distribution is such that it becomes mathematically difficult - if not impossible - for a statewide voter referendum to pass if Seattle is not on board. That influences how things are done in Washington: most things are done in the state legislature, where every county has equal representation.

Even the fight against the $15/hr referendum is influenced by this mathematical fact: opponents are not hopeful that a statewide vote will pass because the referendum polls VERY strongly in Seattle (and some other nearby cities stand to benefit from the referendum passing). Hence the federal lawsuit that was filed, despite the fact that it is unlikely that the courts will intervene.
But what about Vancouver and all the other Washington components of Portland's MSA?

Twin Cities wouldn't work because of Duluth, otherwise it's a good fit.

Maybe Providence? I feel like the state would need to be very small for it to work.
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Old 06-12-2014, 06:53 PM
 
Location: The City in the Forest
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For Atlanta I would say maybe. It definitely gets most of the attention, and it's by far the largest city and metro area in the state, but there are other metro areas that have pulls as well. It would really depend on what area of the state you were in. There is Augusta, which in basically on the GA/SC border, and it has a pull from East Georgia to West South Carolina, which is pretty significant amount of people, but not near Atlanta's reach. The is also to a lesser extent, Savannah. Most people usually come to Atlanta for jobs or entertainment from all around the state. Most people in Georgia wouldn't consider Atlanta as their own city and a majority of the rural areas of the state don't like Atlanta much. The most popular sports team isn't in the metro, but Atlanta definitely dominates politics in the state, has the most people, and gets most of the attention.
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