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Old 06-18-2014, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,341 posts, read 14,104,968 times
Reputation: 5964

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Ha! You really think the world revolves around Chicago? Cleveland and Detroit are not "representative" of Chicago's anything. They were strong industrial cities, that were connected to each other and Pittsburgh for the various stages and components of automobile manufacturing. As a life-long Clevelander, I feel very little connection with Chicago economically, culturally, or sentimentally. I feel a much closer connection with the East Coast culturally, although we're tempered with some midwestern niceness. Chicago on the other hand is midwest all the way, from the accents to the attitudes, not that that's a bad thing, it's just not us.
The other Cleveland booster calls Cleveland "Little Chicago" and claims everyone in Cleveland uses that term.
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Old 06-18-2014, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Raccoon City
814 posts, read 1,072,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Ha! You really think the world revolves around Chicago? Cleveland and Detroit are not "representative" of Chicago's anything. They were strong industrial cities, that were connected to each other and Pittsburgh for the various stages and components of automobile manufacturing. As a life-long Clevelander, I feel very little connection with Chicago economically, culturally, or sentimentally. I feel a much closer connection with the East Coast culturally, although we're tempered with some midwestern niceness. Chicago on the other hand is midwest all the way, from the accents to the attitudes, not that that's a bad thing, it's just not us.
I mean "representative" as in aspects of what is (or was) strong in cities like Cleveland and Detroit (industrial manufacturing) and KC, Omaha, and Minneapolis (argo-industry) are represented in Chicago's economy. But yes, Chicago had a role in the development of the Midwest and trade on the Great Lakes. Cleveland has been important node in the Midwestern economy, and is linked to Chicago in many ways whether you "feel" it or not.
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Old 06-18-2014, 06:59 AM
 
3,961 posts, read 3,495,663 times
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Isn't Chicago one of the youngest cities on the great lakes for all intents and purposes?
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Old 06-18-2014, 09:00 AM
 
56,648 posts, read 80,952,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CurlyFries View Post
If NYC and upstate New York were separate states then we'd easily be able to make a perfect Great Lakes region though I do think giving the colored states of this map "Midwestern" term before the actual north central states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas) is odd.
You could put certain Upstate NY counties within the region.
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Old 06-18-2014, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,240 posts, read 2,514,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForYourLungsOnly View Post
The term "Midwest" is used to describe such a large region that I often think it should be divided into 2 separate regions. This makes sense to me both geographically and for the fact that such a large region has many cultures. There's the industrial Midwest and Great Lakes region and then there is the more agricultural Great Planes states that lack the industrial component. Dividing the Midwest into the "Great Lakes Region" and "Midwest" like this kind of makes sense to me. Grouping North Dakota and Ohio in the same region just seems ridiculous to me. Just as ridiculous as saying Los Angeles and Seattle are in the same region and dubbing it "West".


Great Lakes Region: Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota

Midwest: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Missouri
That's the way it is in my mind. Proud to be from the "Great Lakes Region". Moving back next weekend! Michigan, here we come!

The only oddball to me in this is Iowa. It could go either way.
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Old 06-18-2014, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
3,698 posts, read 4,533,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I think the average human being would look at the way things are categorized and analyzed on C-D and be baffled by why so much energy is put into it. Especially the countless threads of emotionally charged rhetoric and debate over things are mostly opinion and homer based. Things that can't be verified scientifically at all. We here are a special breed, but somebody has got to love us!

Back to topic I have long thought that the Great lakes region and the rest of the midwest aren't always perfect fits for each other.
Eh, I think people just have many interests. Some (like many of us) enjoy geography, the cultures that come with it and different cities, and the different ways people seem to 'classify' and view other parts of the country. I'd agree though we tend to get pretty over the top on this website..but that's why it's fun!
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Old 06-18-2014, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
3,698 posts, read 4,533,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
That's the way it is in my mind. Proud to be from the "Great Lakes Region". Moving back next weekend! Michigan, here we come!

The only oddball to me in this is Iowa. It could go either way.
I'd agree about Iowa. It kind of is an oddball. It is definitely more reminiscent of Missouri than it is Michigan though.
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Old 06-18-2014, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,738,718 times
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Driftless Iowa fits in with MN/WI/IL obviously, but I usually think of the rest of the state as outside my specific region.
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Old 06-19-2014, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,764,382 times
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Is this where I come in? I can help explain Iowa! It's an oddball because it's the intersection of quite a few different areas. Des Moines, for example, is a lot like both St. Paul and Kansas City; likewise, Iowa City has a lot in common with Madison and with St. Louis and with Chicago, all for different reasons. Then on top of that, northeast Iowa is worlds away culturally from southwest Iowa. Here is my personal mental breakdown, based on about a decade of living in Des Moines and Decorah, plus significant time in the Twin Cities and a stint in South Dakota.

Most similar to Missouri ("Lower Midwest" or "Midlands"):


Most similar to Minnesota and Wisconsin ("Upper Midwest"):


Most similar to South Dakota and Nebraska ("Great Plains"):


Most similar to Illinois ("Great Lakes" for lack of a better term):


Put together:
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Old 01-02-2018, 10:28 PM
 
384 posts, read 124,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
I don't think these regions work either. Illinois isn't really that different from Iowa or Missouri, and Minnesota and Wisconsin are pretty different from Ohio and Indiana. Really, I see the "Midwest" grouped like this...

Region 1: Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Western Indiana
Region 2: Minnesota, Wisconsin, UP Michigan
Region 3: Eastern Indiana, Western Ohio, Southern Michigan
Region 4: Eastern Ohio, Western PA, Western NY, Northwestern West Virginia

I realize some people don't want to call Region 4 the midwest. But I'd argue that whatever you want to call it, these areas should be grouped together.

Anything West of Iowa is Great Planes.
I like your divisions because they split the region up within sociopolitical and time zone boundaries. Pittsburgh is definitely not a Midwestern town, but doesn't fall in culturally to the I-95 corridor 5-6 hours to the east. As far as the Great Plains, I've always gone by the Tragically Hip's definition of the 100th Meridian West. This is about where characteristics of the Midwest fade into the almost west higher grasslands, sand hills, high country and gradual rise in the continental plain. For instance, many towns in western Nebraska and the Dakotas are as far west as eastern Colorado and in the same time zone (Rocky Mountain). There's a distinct difference in the landscape when traveling across South Dakota on Interstate 90 from Sioux Falls and Mitchell to Sturgis, Deadwood, and Mount Rushmore (which all look more like neighboring Wyoming than anywhere in the Midwest.
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