U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Best Lake City
Toronto 17 13.39%
Buffalo 7 5.51%
Erie 3 2.36%
Cleveland 15 11.81%
Detroit 5 3.94%
Chicago 47 37.01%
Milwaukee 22 17.32%
Green Bay 1 0.79%
Madison 20 15.75%
Minneapolis 22 17.32%
Duluth, MN 7 5.51%
Couer d'Alene, ID 13 10.24%
Burlington, VT 12 9.45%
Seattle 14 11.02%
Orlando 2 1.57%
Austin 2 1.57%
Other (please name it) 5 3.94%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 127. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-20-2014, 09:26 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,434 posts, read 18,347,278 times
Reputation: 11924

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Pretty sure Lake St. Clair counts as a lake.
That's what I was thinking. Grosse Pointe is adjacent to Detroit so close enough.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-20-2014, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,321,280 times
Reputation: 4270
For me it's Minneapolis and Madison.

None of the other cities (with few exceptions) have lake access anywhere near the level of either of these cities do. Most of the Great Lakes cities have gorgeous shoreline that's adjacent to downtown but it's only readily accessible to a tiny fraction of the overall population. No other cities incorporate the lakes into the city fabric like Mpls or Madison do either (Orlando and Seattle do to an extent, but I'd argue less so).

So even though I get why Chicago gets a ton of votes (isn't the skyline pretty along the lake?!), I don't consider a great "lake city" whatsoever, and unless you live along the Gold Coast you'd probably agree, since you probably rarely ever see the lake.

They all have their merits, nonetheless, so there's not really a wrong answer (except Austin, WTF!).


*Edit: I have lived in three of these "Lake Cities": Chicago, Minneapolis and Cleveland, and have visited many of the others listed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,739,087 times
Reputation: 946
Disagree on access - where I live (Bayview, in Milwaukee) the entire Lake Michigan shore is accessible to the public running all the way from port/downtown south to the suburbs. Some really GREAT beaches/parks (Sheridan, Grant, Bayview, etc.) along the way. Downtown has Veteren's and other parks with shops and restaurants and the MAM. North side is where there's more privately owned land, but even there you have the best-known Milwaukee beaches (like Bradford). The lake is VERY accessible in Milwaukee. I walk/ride bike along the lakefront several times a week whenever there's good weather, and there are always other people, sometimes tons of 'em. And the suburbs are absolutely peppered with accessible glacial lakes. My access here is simpler/easier than when I lived in Madison, for sure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,341 posts, read 14,108,709 times
Reputation: 5964
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Pretty sure Lake St. Clair counts as a lake.
That's why I mentioned SE Michigan. Detroit does not touch Lake St. Clair, unless you are counting the mouth of the Detroit River.........then barely.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,321,280 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
Disagree on access - where I live (Bayview, in Milwaukee) the entire Lake Michigan shore is accessible to the public running all the way from port/downtown south to the suburbs. Some really GREAT beaches/parks (Sheridan, Grant, Bayview, etc.) along the way. Downtown has Veteren's and other parks with shops and restaurants and the MAM. North side is where there's more privately owned land, but even there you have the best-known Milwaukee beaches (like Bradford). The lake is VERY accessible in Milwaukee. I walk/ride bike along the lakefront several times a week whenever there's good weather, and there are always other people, sometimes tons of 'em. And the suburbs are absolutely peppered with accessible glacial lakes. My access here is simpler/easier than when I lived in Madison, for sure.
Well I lived in Chicago and nobody goes to the lake unless they live near it. At least, nobody I know or met, but obviously I can't speak for all 10 million people. Milwaukee has more access because of that other lake in the Western suburbs -- Milwaukee's Lake Minnetonka, if you will.

When I think "access" I'm thinking about total miles of accessible shoreline, especially near the existing population. Madison and Mpls both have a very large population within a 5-10 minute walk to any lake, which I cannot say for Chicago (perhaps Milwaukee is a bit closer to this level of "accessibility"). People may visit a few times a year or weekends at best, but cerrtainly not daily.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 02:02 PM
 
1,000 posts, read 1,504,522 times
Reputation: 729
I really think the poll should be split between Great Lakes shoreline cities (Chicago, Toronto, Cleveland, Milwaukee, Buffalo, Duluth, Green Bay, Erie) and traditional lakes cities (Minneapolis, Orlando, Austin, Madison, Seattle, Burlington, Couer d'Alene).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,739,087 times
Reputation: 946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Well I lived in Chicago and nobody goes to the lake unless they live near it. At least, nobody I know or met, but obviously I can't speak for all 10 million people. Milwaukee has more access because of that other lake in the Western suburbs -- Milwaukee's Lake Minnetonka, if you will.

When I think "access" I'm thinking about total miles of accessible shoreline, especially near the existing population. Madison and Mpls both have a very large population within a 5-10 minute walk to any lake, which I cannot say for Chicago (perhaps Milwaukee is a bit closer to this level of "accessibility"). People may visit a few times a year or weekends at best, but cerrtainly not daily.
The densest areas of Milwaukee are along the Lake. Pretty much everyone I know who would be into that sort of thing goes down by the Lake. And when you're too far west for a short drive, you're in Lake Country, with all the lakes I mentioned above - there isn't any "one" lake, the suburbs are full of dozens. I can guarantee you right now that way more people have access to Lake Michigan within a 5-10 minute walk in the Milwaukee area than Monona/Mendota in Madison. That's not even factoring in the Milwaukee Riverwalk (there are lots of rivers running through town). It's OK, I just think you're not that familiar with Milwaukee.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,739,087 times
Reputation: 946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bslette View Post
I really think the poll should be split between Great Lakes shoreline cities (Chicago, Toronto, Cleveland, Milwaukee, Buffalo, Duluth, Green Bay, Erie) and traditional lakes cities (Minneapolis, Orlando, Austin, Madison, Seattle, Burlington, Couer d'Alene).
Maybe!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 02:23 PM
 
1,000 posts, read 1,504,522 times
Reputation: 729
Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
The densest areas of Milwaukee are along the Lake. Pretty much everyone I know who would be into that sort of thing goes down by the Lake. And when you're too far west for a short drive, you're in Lake Country, with all the lakes I mentioned above - there isn't any "one" lake, the suburbs are full of dozens. I can guarantee you right now that way more people have access to Lake Michigan within a 5-10 minute walk in the Milwaukee area than Monona/Mendota in Madison. That's not even factoring in the Milwaukee Riverwalk (there are lots of rivers running through town). It's OK, I just think you're not that familiar with Milwaukee.
I think Milwaukee's lakefront is great, better than other Great Lakes cities like Cleveland, Buffalo, Erie, and in some aspects Chicago. But... you can't factor in the Riverwalk. That's a river, this is about lakes. Nobody else is counting the Chicago River for Chicago, the Mississippi or St. Anthony Falls for Minneapolis, etc.

Also, once again I've realized that this is yet another situation where St. Paul is being overlooked. St. Paul is also a terrific lake city and should be included in the poll by itself or combined with Minneapolis.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2014, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,321,280 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
The densest areas of Milwaukee are along the Lake. Pretty much everyone I know who would be into that sort of thing goes down by the Lake. And when you're too far west for a short drive, you're in Lake Country, with all the lakes I mentioned above - there isn't any "one" lake, the suburbs are full of dozens. I can guarantee you right now that way more people have access to Lake Michigan within a 5-10 minute walk in the Milwaukee area than Monona/Mendota in Madison. That's not even factoring in the Milwaukee Riverwalk (there are lots of rivers running through town). It's OK, I just think you're not that familiar with Milwaukee.
I'm not extremely familiar with Milwaukee....guilty.

I'm talking about two cities at once (Chicago and Milwaukee), and basing my knowledge solely on living in Chicago, which was admittedly a mistake, because the two cities may both be on a lakefront but Milwaukee actually has lots more lakes interspersed within the metro. So do the Twin Cities. I was just impressed with how Madison's lakes reminded me very much of the Chain of Lakes in Minneapolis, which I think are a perfect example of how to integrate water with neighborhoods/people (everyday people).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top