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Old 06-19-2014, 08:25 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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This is not about what's more well known or has more a urban vibe in its cities as obviously Halifax is not match for Boston but rather somewhere in between it and Portland, Maine. In recent threads people have posted lots of discussion on the similarities between American and Canadian cities with not much of an abrupt cultural difference as one would get going from the US into Mexico. What's commonly said about the Maritimes of Canada (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI, and Newfoundland) are a lot like New England and could more or less an extension of Maine. Do you think so or are there palpable cultural differences in the Maritimes that set them apart?
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Old 06-19-2014, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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They are much less densely populated than the southern New England states. It's a long way in New Brunswick from one town to the next. In Nova Scotia, virtually the entire population lives within walking distance of the ocean. Once you're past Auguste, Maine, there is nothing, nothing, nothing, on either side of the border, except a few modest cities like Bangor, Fredericton, Moncton, Saint John, Halifax. with just space in between.

I think the palpable culture differences you will find is that in Canada, they are Canadians---much less fearful and suspicious of strangers, you might say more comfortable in their own skin, with a Maritime dignity. People in the street will make eye contact with you, and even speak if spoken to. Quite a few people in eastern New Brunswick will speak English poorly, and be reluctant to try. But they'll be friendlier if they know you are American, because they understand that the reason you can't speak French is not out of spite..

Newfoundland, if you get that far, is very different from anywhere else in Canada, or the world.

Last edited by jtur88; 06-19-2014 at 10:28 PM..
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Old 06-20-2014, 05:21 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Yes, I figured Newfoundland is a world of its own being the big rock that it is way up in the North Atlantic. I've heard the accent, they're definitely characters up there. Saint John's is on my Canadian bucket list and it definitely sounds like a more spirited place than say....Calgary.
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Old 06-20-2014, 07:51 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Maine and Nova Scotia definitely feel like they have some similarities.
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Old 06-21-2014, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
Yes, I figured Newfoundland is a world of its own being the big rock that it is way up in the North Atlantic. I've heard the accent, they're definitely characters up there. Saint John's is on my Canadian bucket list and it definitely sounds like a more spirited place than say....Calgary.
Just to avoid any confusion,, when you do go there:

The one in New Brunswick is always spelled Saint John, never St. John, and pronounced SAINT-john
The one in Newfoundland is always spelled St. John's, never Saint John's, and pronounced sin-JOHNZ.
Newfoundland is accented on the last syllable, like "understand".
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Old 06-21-2014, 02:21 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Just to avoid any confusion,, when you do go there:

The one in New Brunswick is always spelled Saint John, never St. John, and pronounced SAINT-john
The one in Newfoundland is always spelled St. John's, never Saint John's, and pronounced sin-JOHNZ.
Newfoundland is accented on the last syllable, like "understand".
So what was your favorite part of the region?
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Old 06-21-2014, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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The Maritimes are significantly poorer. The economic situation is one of the worst in Canada, let alone the US. Many have migrated to Toronto, Montreal, or the west to find work.

Many in the Maritimes speak French (New Brunswick) and the only French language university outside of Quebec is located there.

The Maritimes are much less densely populated and more isolated than New England. There are no major cities like Boston or the dense urban areas like in Connecticut. Halifax is really just a large town, but its isolated location puts it on the map. There are more significant Canadian cities and towns like Hamilton that most outside of Canada have never heard of.
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Old 06-21-2014, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
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I can trace my ancestry through Eastport Maine, St. Stephen N.B. Deer Island N.B. and Campobello Island. As a kid in Eastport Maine I saw no difference between people no matter what side of the border they lived and in those days you could just flash your drivers license as you drove across the border. People there share a common heritage and are good neighbors to each other.
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Old 06-21-2014, 08:49 PM
 
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The Maritimes are much more rural and relatively isolated compared to the New England states... I say "isolated" because there's a bit of a forested and sparsely populated 'buffer zone' between northern Maine and New Brunswick. There aren't many people in the Maritimes who didn't grow up there, and have family roots going way, way back.

There's a bit more migration into New England from other places. Many New England areas feel like suburbs of Boston (or even NYC further south), and I guess they more or less function that way. They get lots of tourist traffic up from NYC and Boston. There are more affluent people there, and the economic activity is more robust. The pace of life is slower and quieter in the Maritimes. I think it's a much more 'traditional' way of life in a lot of ways. New Englanders have a more modern, mainstream American outlook.

Also, there's the obvious difference in accent. People in northern Maine at least have a really strong accent. There are different accents in the Maritimes.

My mother grew up in a border town between NB and Maine, on the Canadian side. Decades ago, she swears the differences between Americans and Canadians were more pronounced. She swears Americans "walk differently".
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Old 06-21-2014, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa2011 View Post

My mother grew up in a border town between NB and Maine, on the Canadian side. Decades ago, she swears the differences between Americans and Canadians were more pronounced. She swears Americans "walk differently".
I've heard this from alot of people. I think that over time our body language has converged. In the past, differences in body language were a bit like an accent. My friend from a working class area of greater LA, which is probably more different then the border states, has remarked on differences in body language in Canada he noticed when he first arrived, such as a larger personal space bubble, and how people walk with less of a swagger.
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