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Old 11-20-2018, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Floribama
14,949 posts, read 31,348,948 times
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Old 11-20-2018, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
The word "dollar" is pronounced more like "dawllar" (the first syllable rhyming with the name "Al").
That seems contradictory. Is there somewhere in the country where the name "Al" is said as "Awl"?
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Old 11-20-2018, 07:43 AM
 
417 posts, read 127,126 times
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The Midwest has a lot of different accents. Hell, some states have multiple accents inside of them. Iowa's a great example. There are 3 fairly distinct accents here.

The northern part of the state, especially the northeastern part has an accent that's very similar to Minnesota and Wisconsin. Long O's, weird A's, and lots of turning "Uh" sounds into hard O's (for example, the F word sounds like "fock"). "Oh jeez" and "you betcha" are common.

The middle rural part of the state has a more nasally traditional middle Midwestern accent. The best example is the turning of short A's into long A's. Long time Iowa State sports announcer Pete Taylor exemplified this. When describing the positioning of the ball on the field, he would pronounce "hashmark" to sound like "hayshmark".

Southern Iowa, especially SW Iowa picks up a little of the mild twangy drawl that you get in Missouri or Kansas, that just intensifies into a full blown southern/western accent as you continue going south (like OK or TX).

So extrapolate that across the whole region, and yeah, pretty much everyone has an accent.
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Old 11-22-2018, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,730,726 times
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Literally everybody on the planet has an accent. Think you don't have one? You're wrong. You are just used to hearing yours.
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Old 01-13-2019, 04:54 PM
 
1 posts, read 219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ExpatInUSA View Post

I will try to explain what the Midwest accent sounds to me as a second-language English speaker. The most notable trait is a nasality (is that a word?) which they apply to the vowels; this nasality is the one thing which makes the accent the most difficult to understand. It is also higher-pitched compared to every other region of the country.

Midwesterners also have the habit of refusing to speak up; they mumble words and get mad when people cannot understand them. A lady at a grocery store got mad at me because she mumbled a price to me and I could not understand a single thing she said. In addition, they pronounce words very differently from other regions. The word "dollar" is pronounced more like "dawllar" (the first syllable rhyming with the name "Al"). The word "not" sounds more like "nat" and they use the word "yet" differently to replace "still" which confused me endlessly.
You are absolutely correct!

I hear that "nasal" quality all over the mid-west! It's especially pronounced in Minnesota & Chicago. I hear things like the state pronounced as "Mina-SOOO-ta" where the "O" sound is elongated. I've also heard the "dawllar" pronunciation to describe the U.S. currency. I also have a good friend from St. Paul, MN who mumbles and gets aggravated that I can't understand her!

And to make matters worse, every time I've commented on it, I've been told, "Oh I don't have an accent!" This has been followed by, "I sound like the people on TV." And then they have the nerve to make fun of me and my "Southern" accent.

EVERYTHING you've described is absolutely true!
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Old 01-13-2019, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
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The only neutral accent I’ve heard centers around Columbus OH. The upper Midwest is nasally and the lower Midwest is more “country”.
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Old 01-13-2019, 05:32 PM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
6,307 posts, read 4,669,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
The only neutral accent I’ve heard centers around Columbus OH. The upper Midwest is nasally and the lower Midwest is more “country”.
And the middle Midwest, where I'm from, is normal.
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Old 01-13-2019, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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The only ones I have a hard time understanding are people in places like Wisconsin who sound more Canadian.
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Old 01-13-2019, 06:38 PM
 
2,013 posts, read 1,011,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
Ha! That's hilarious. I lived in SE Michigan for years, and the accent there (to my ear, almost identical to the accent in Chicago, Cleveland, parts of Minnesota and Wisconsin, and even Western NY) is VERY nasally and hard. The accent from Indiana seems much easier on the ears, in comparison.
Indiana sounds very southern....very.
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Old 01-13-2019, 08:50 PM
 
1,549 posts, read 2,981,627 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ExpatInUSA View Post
I lived in the St Louis area.
Bingo. St. Louis, while not quite the Deep South, is more southern than midwestern.
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