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Old 06-24-2014, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,179 posts, read 3,850,465 times
Reputation: 2478

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
No, none whatsoever.

I've heard "sweep the floor" to describe vaccuuming, as in "would you sweep the floor" when I was staring at carpet. I would have said "vaccuum the floor".
Before moving to OH, I've never described an upset person as being "salty" before.


It's possible that the Upper Midwest has more quirks, but it's a phenomenon that's commonplace throughout the U.S., including your home.
Ha "salty" is actually a shaker specific word invented by high school students. Makes me proud that people still use it. I've never heard sweep the floor used for someone who means vacuum the floor. Possibly you were just talking to a strange person.
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Old 06-24-2014, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,319,838 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
I didn't say that, I just said we don't have the language quirks. Just an observation, not a value judgement. I actually dislike the strong Cleveland ayyccent. But in terms of the words themselves, we tend to use proper English. No one here uses yet when they mean still, borrow when they mean lend, anymore when they mean nowadays, or done dinner when they mean done with dinner.
Some of these I've never heard of and have lived in the Upper Midwest much longer than you. My personal favorite (besides borrowing you some sugar) is "duck, duck, grey duck"!
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Old 06-24-2014, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,319,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Ha "salty" is actually a shaker specific word invented by high school students. Makes me proud that people still use it. I've never heard sweep the floor used for someone who means vacuum the floor. Possibly you were just talking to a strange person.
Is it possible YOU were talking to a strange person? I was in Columbus at the time but I've heard it again afterwards.
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Old 06-24-2014, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,383 posts, read 59,858,320 times
Reputation: 54029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormwitch View Post
Most of the "quirks" I found in Illinois tended to be related to time. In addition to the aforementioned "yet/still" confusion, it was always strange to me to hear people use the word "anymore" to mean "nowadays".
My mom says that and she's from the southwestern Pennsylvania mountains, not Illinois.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
Even the accents are better in Cleveland
Well ... Now that you mention it, yes!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
I've never heard sweep the floor used for someone who means vacuum the floor. Possibly you were just talking to a strange person.
If you call a vacuum cleaner a "sweeper" - which is not uncommon - then sweeping the floor makes perfect sense.
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,764,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
This is it.

I've always thought of it as the Great Lakes accent. People I've known from Buffalo, Chicago, Michigan, and Wisconsin speak this way, like in the SNL skit at the above link. Watch the movie Fargo to hear it in all its glory. It's all about the vowels.
The accent in Fargo is mostly fictional, but neither it nor the real accent it is based on is the Northern Cities Vowel Shift. What you are referring to is Upper Midwest American English, which is has similarities to both Canadian English (which is not affected by the Northern Cities Vowel Shift) and Inland Northern American English (which is affected by the Northern Cities Vowel Shift), as well as some speech patterns that resemble Scandinavian languages. There are aspects of the Northern Cities Vowel Shift present in Upper Midwest American, but it is not the defining feature like it is in Chicago and Buffalo.
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Old 06-24-2014, 05:58 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,507 posts, read 14,330,903 times
Reputation: 23357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
My mom says that and she's from the southwestern Pennsylvania mountains, not Illinois.


Well ... Now that you mention it, yes!


If you call a vacuum cleaner a "sweeper" - which is not uncommon - then sweeping the floor makes perfect sense.
I don't remember where I lived at the time, but it was not uncommon to hear my female friends in that area talk about 'hoovering' the floor.
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Old 06-25-2014, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,738,718 times
Reputation: 946
Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
The accent in Fargo is mostly fictional
It's funny how many people don't realize this.
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Old 06-25-2014, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Cleveland
3,179 posts, read 3,850,465 times
Reputation: 2478
Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
It's funny how many people don't realize this.
Well, it's not that far off, I mean it was done by actors who are not from Minnesota, so naturally it wasn't perfect. It may be a bit exaggerated, but it's close to reality for most of rural Minnesota.
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Old 06-25-2014, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,738,718 times
Reputation: 946
No, it isn't. No more than an actor from Maine "doing a Southern accent." It may be applauded by other Mainers, but southerners would be rolling their eyes or protesting. Just like people who actually live in Minnesota do when they watch Fargo.
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Old 06-25-2014, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,328 posts, read 21,900,953 times
Reputation: 33512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleverfield View Post
Well, it's not that far off, I mean it was done by actors who are not from Minnesota, so naturally it wasn't perfect. It may be a bit exaggerated, but it's close to reality for most of rural Minnesota.
not just rural Minnesota but many of the man/woman-on-the-street interviews the local news stations do here in town could be the bit players from the movie. A more pronounced husker-doo accent can be heard on the radio call-ins on K-FAN, 'CCO and the like. People here tend not to hear it because it's so prevelant.

this is a real TC commercial, not an out-take from the movie 'Fargo'...end of story.



Garage Door Repair Commercial - YouTube

Last edited by Ghengis; 06-25-2014 at 11:18 AM..
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