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Old 07-02-2014, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,535 posts, read 8,798,907 times
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Boston has 2 upper class neighborhoods: Beacon Hill and, to a lesser extent, Back Bay. It also has its share of Italian and Irish Neighborhoods, which are probably more famous and larger in South and North Boston.
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Old 07-02-2014, 01:16 PM
 
116 posts, read 175,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
Seattle is a great neighborhoody city with scattered urban nodes each with their own little character and little downtown like business districts. Some of the best examples are......

Queen Anne
Capital Hill
Wallingford
U District
Ballard
Fremont
West Seattle (Alaska Junction/Alki)
Agreed. Seattle truly is a city of distinct neighborhoods - more than most in my opinion. Some others to add to the list that have the mini downtown-like business districts:

Greenwood/Phinney
Madrona
Columbia City
Admiral
Eastlake
Upper Queen Anne (I'm assuming the reference above was to Lower Queen Anne - they are definitely distinct)
Georgetown
SLU/Cascade
Madison Park/Valley
Roosevelt
Greenlake
And many more...
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Old 07-02-2014, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,888 posts, read 10,413,795 times
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If you can use the name of your neighborhood on your mailing address-you probably live in a city of unique neighborhoods.

For example Boston, NYC and Philly- Dorchester, MA; Riverdale, NY; Germantown, PA and many others in these cities.
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Old 07-03-2014, 03:41 PM
 
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Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle definitely come to mind.
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Old 07-04-2014, 02:43 PM
 
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Every CvC Booster is going to swear their city is a "City of Neighborhoods".... LOL
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Old 07-05-2014, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,273,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackbeauty212 View Post
Every CvC Booster is going to swear their city is a "City of Neighborhoods".... LOL
Yeah...merely listing names of neighborhoods doesn't make much of a case for a city. What are the most distinct neighborhoods and why?
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Old 07-05-2014, 04:13 PM
 
2,199 posts, read 2,328,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
Yeah...merely listing names of neighborhoods doesn't make much of a case for a city. What are the most distinct neighborhoods and why?
There are also a lot of city-data type urbanophiles who will list "official" city-designated neighborhoods as though they are real, actual distinctive entities, when often they are normally considered (if they are even widely known) subdivisions of larger neighborhood clusters or groupings by most normal citizens.
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Old 07-05-2014, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Over-the-Rhine, Ohio
548 posts, read 657,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernard_ View Post
Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle definitely come to mind.
Chicago is definitely NOT on my list of Neighborhood Cities. It's the same situation as Milwaukee. There are some clearly defined neighborhoods, but large swaths of the city are written off as "West Side" and "South Side." In real neighborhood cities every single neighborhood is well defined and has clear borders that are known by everyone.
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Old 07-05-2014, 06:53 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,074 posts, read 2,009,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalparadise View Post
While every city will have an interesting district, neighborhood or two that is lively or attractive, some cities are defined by their neighborhoods, or they have neighborhoods that have a particular appeal or personality. These neighborhoods are incredibly distinct, vibrant, and serve as a defining feature of a city's culture and vibe, either to locals, tourists, or both. In my experience, the big "neighborhood cities" are places like San Francisco, New York City, Chicago, DC, St. Louis, New Orleans, Boston, and a few others.

Which neighborhoods stand out to you in your city and why?
I'll share some faves for Boston (though I doubt my descriptions will be as well written).

Allston
https://flic.kr/p/5fBMFM

While I have heard some refer to this neighborhood as "the student ghetto", Allston is (or at least was) one of the last neighborhoods in Boston to experience gentrification, and is (or was) one of the last places in the city where you could see some old school Bostonian grit. The area is home to a number of Korean and Brazilian shops, bakeries, and restaurants; I've always found it to be one of Boston's more culturally diverse neighborhoods.


Jamaica Plain
https://flic.kr/p/6H9Q92

This is arguably Boston's most Bohemian neighborhood. I've heard this neighborhood alternatively refered to as either "Gay-P" or "Jamaica Spain". Every Spring it holds a celebration called "Wake Up the Earth", which is on my Boston bucket list. Center Street is its main thoroughfare, and it is a neighborhood that, while currently attracting tons for young professionals and families, still maintains its telltale quirkiness.


East Boston
https://flic.kr/p/6pGei9

Like Allston, this neighborhood is one of the least gentrified areas of Boston despite the fact that it is well served by public transportation. Located across the harbor from Boston, it used to be one of the most Italian neighborhoods in Boston. Today it's mostly Hispanic with a good mix of other ethnicities as well. It is a very densely populated area, especially the part closest to Boston. This is also the neighborhood where Logan Airport is located (though the neighborhood was there before the airport).


Charlestown
https://flic.kr/p/gN1Jsf

Long-time residents of this neighborhood are referred to as "townies". And furthermore, this neighborhood has a ton of self-identity and pride. "Bunker Hill Day", which celebrates the Battle of Bunker Hill, is considered a public holiday in the city of Boston, and a big parade is held on Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown. The neighborhood itself is dominated by both wood and brick rowhomes (really one of the only places in the city with large amounts of wooden rowhomes). It's skyline is dominated by the Bunker Hill Monument.
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Old 07-05-2014, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,273,887 times
Reputation: 3145
Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
I'll share some faves for Boston (though I doubt my descriptions will be as well written).

Allston
https://flic.kr/p/5fBMFM

While I have heard some refer to this neighborhood as "the student ghetto", Allston is (or at least was) one of the last neighborhoods in Boston to experience gentrification, and is (or was) one of the last places in the city where you could see some old school Bostonian grit. The area is home to a number of Korean and Brazilian shops, bakeries, and restaurants; I've always found it to be one of Boston's more culturally diverse neighborhoods.


Jamaica Plain
https://flic.kr/p/6H9Q92

This is arguably Boston's most Bohemian neighborhood. I've heard this neighborhood alternatively refered to as either "Gay-P" or "Jamaica Spain". Every Spring it holds a celebration called "Wake Up the Earth", which is on my Boston bucket list. Center Street is its main thoroughfare, and it is a neighborhood that, while currently attracting tons for young professionals and families, still maintains its telltale quirkiness.


East Boston
https://flic.kr/p/6pGei9

Like Allston, this neighborhood is one of the least gentrified areas of Boston despite the fact that it is well served by public transportation. Located across the harbor from Boston, it used to be one of the most Italian neighborhoods in Boston. Today it's mostly Hispanic with a good mix of other ethnicities as well. It is a very densely populated area, especially the part closest to Boston. This is also the neighborhood where Logan Airport is located (though the neighborhood was there before the airport).


Charlestown
https://flic.kr/p/gN1Jsf

Long-time residents of this neighborhood are referred to as "townies". And furthermore, this neighborhood has a ton of self-identity and pride. "Bunker Hill Day", which celebrates the Battle of Bunker Hill, is considered a public holiday in the city of Boston, and a big parade is held on Bunker Hill Street in Charlestown. The neighborhood itself is dominated by both wood and brick rowhomes (really one of the only places in the city with large amounts of wooden rowhomes). It's skyline is dominated by the Bunker Hill Monument.
Nice. I know those neighborhoods, except East Boston. Good descriptions.
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