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Old 07-07-2014, 12:23 PM
 
3,308 posts, read 2,763,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernard_ View Post
Sorry, but I (and I believe the majority of people and food critics) strongly disagree. Burritos in the Bay Area are better than San Diego. San Diego burritos are much simpler and I've found them to often be bland. Bay Area burritos are bursting with flavor - take La Taqueria (#2 on this list) for example. Many flavorful ingredients expertly blended in an amazing flour tortilla - every bite is like an incredible meal in itself.

Also, Chipotle has as much to do with true Bay Area-style burritos as Pizza Hut does with authentic NYC pizzerias. Chipotle was started in Denver and supposedly models itself after the "Mission" style, but is in many ways the antithesis of it. It tastes like cardboard and completely lacks flavor. Not to mention no sense of good ingredient distribution. It is a pretty terrible burrito.

Well we can agree to disagree. I don't really follow food critics.

I grew up eating burritos at home, tortillas made from scratch by my grandmother and aunts. I'm very picky about the tortillas, the beans and the meat.

I think in any city where there is a large Mexican population you are bound to find a good burrito since there are SO MANY places everywhere. You and I can both say the burritos aren't good in San Francisco, or not good in San Diego, but we are both wrong. I haven't been in SF enough to eat at a wide variety of places.

The places in SD where I have found the best burritos are places that aren't even on people's radars. They are in low-income areas and the places are very modest, so no one knows about them and they will never get alot of attention or rated. I didn't even know about them- they are random places I just happened to find and I was blown away. The 'recommended' places on the 'best of' lists and the opinions of the 'majority' are usually disappointing IMO.
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:39 AM
 
29 posts, read 53,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
Well we can agree to disagree. I don't really follow food critics.

I grew up eating burritos at home, tortillas made from scratch by my grandmother and aunts. I'm very picky about the tortillas, the beans and the meat.

I think in any city where there is a large Mexican population you are bound to find a good burrito since there are SO MANY places everywhere. You and I can both say the burritos aren't good in San Francisco, or not good in San Diego, but we are both wrong. I haven't been in SF enough to eat at a wide variety of places.

The places in SD where I have found the best burritos are places that aren't even on people's radars. They are in low-income areas and the places are very modest, so no one knows about them and they will never get alot of attention or rated. I didn't even know about them- they are random places I just happened to find and I was blown away. The 'recommended' places on the 'best of' lists and the opinions of the 'majority' are usually disappointing IMO.
rosa, you sound like someone who knows what they're talking about. Are there any "off the radar" burrito places in North County that you'd recommend? I'm on the border of Carlsbad and Encinitas.
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:33 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,248,572 times
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The Bay Area is certainly the best known for burritos.

Southern CA Mexican food tends to be tacos, tortas and the like. Burritos are an American invention, and don't really fit the "Mexican food" stereotype. The LA/SD Mexican places tend have stuff more similar to what you get in Mexico.
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,396,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
The Bay Area is certainly the best known for burritos.

Southern CA Mexican food tends to be tacos, tortas and the like. Burritos are an American invention, and don't really fit the "Mexican food" stereotype. The LA/SD Mexican places tend have stuff more similar to what you get in Mexico.
This might be the first time I've ever agreed with you
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Old 07-08-2014, 10:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaSun1 View Post
No, it's true. Burritos don't really exist in Mexico. Maybe a tiny bit on the border, because of the American influence, but I haven't seen it. Ask anyone in Mexico and they will say it's an American dish.

I have spent tons of time in Mexico, and never, ever seen a burrito on a menu. If you say the word "burrito" in Mexico they immediately think of a young burro (the animal), not the food. It's definitely an American invention.

A lot of the food in the U.S. that is classified as "Mexican" is really American, or perhaps should be labeled under the "Tex Mex" moniker. That would include burritos, tacos made with flour tortillas, tacos made with cheese, lettuce, tomatos, olives, etc. quesadillas with anything beyond cheese, american-style fajitas, Texas-style migas, etc. For some reason, Americans think Mexican food is very cheesy.

There's always tons of gloppy cheese everywhere, when, in reality, most Mexican cooking uses much less cheese than in the U.S. (in fact in many parts of Mexico almost no cheese is used).

A lot of the stuff has a "cousin" in Mexico (so, for example, migas in Texas are obviously an ofshoot of chilaquiles in Mexico) but it's different. Burritos may have "roots" in Mexican American migration, but are definitely an American phenomenon.
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Old 07-08-2014, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,033,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
No, it's true. Burritos don't really exist in Mexico. Maybe a tiny bit on the border, because of the American influence, but I haven't seen it. Ask anyone in Mexico and they will say it's an American dish.

I have spent tons of time in Mexico, and never, ever seen a burrito on a menu. If you say the word "burrito" in Mexico they immediately think of a young burro (the animal), not the food. It's definitely an American invention.

A lot of the food in the U.S. that is classified as "Mexican" is really American, or perhaps should be labeled under the "Tex Mex" moniker. That would include burritos, tacos made with flour tortillas, tacos made with cheese, lettuce, tomatos, olives, etc. quesadillas with anything beyond cheese, american-style fajitas, Texas-style migas, etc. For some reason, Americans think Mexican food is very cheesy.

There's always tons of gloppy cheese everywhere, when, in reality, most Mexican cooking uses much less cheese than in the U.S. (in fact in many parts of Mexico almost no cheese is used).

A lot of the stuff has a "cousin" in Mexico (so, for example, migas in Texas are obviously an ofshoot of chilaquiles in Mexico) but it's different. Burritos may have "roots" in Mexican American migration, but are definitely an American phenomenon.
Hearing someone named "NOLA" inform about burritos is like going to Arizona to learn about gumbo and jambalaya. Its true burritos are uncommon in most of Mexico but not in Sonora. NW Mexico is similar to the US Southwest in that both are somewhat unfamiliar to the rest of the country.

Burritos came from the Sonoran desert (southern Arizona and Sonora). The origin was the large amount of wheat the area used to produce before most water use was diverted for growing cities and waning agriculture. Wheat has sticky gluten which allows for large tortillas to hold together, which is why corn tortillas are smaller. Large wheat tortillas and the burritos they made possble became common in California due to proximity and it didnt take long for people in the Bay Area to fill them with rice and lettuce and ruin them.

Slow Food USA: White Sonora Wheat

Author and ethno-botanist Gary Paul Nabhan, who's been collecting heirloom seeds throughout the Southwest and NW Mexico since the '70's, has written extensively about White Sonoran Wheat and the cuisine it created in his books for years.
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Old 07-08-2014, 01:13 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,248,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
Hearing someone named "NOLA" inform about burritos is like going to Arizona to learn about gumbo and jambalaya.
I'm Mexican, and born in Mexico City. You will never find a burrito in Mexico City, unless Chipotle or some American chain decides to move there.

And Arizona would be the last place I would go to learn about Mexican food. This is exactly why we're having this conversation; because people in the SW U.S. are always conflating their cuisine with traditional Mexican cuisine. They forget that the northern half of Mexico is almost empty, and their proximity to the country doesn't mean they're actually close to where people live.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
Its true burritos are uncommon in most of Mexico but not in Sonora. NW Mexico is similar to the US Southwest in that both are somewhat unfamiliar to the rest of the country.
Not true. I've been to Sonora and burritos aren't common. Certainly in Hermosillo, burritos aren't part of the regular cuisine. It's the same tacos/tortas as in most of Mexico. Maybe some Americans brought burritos south, but people aren't eating them in Hermosillo for the most part.

And Sonora is a tiny proportion of Mexico. Obviously a state of 2 million isn't relevent in determining whether a country of 120 million is eating burritos. It would be like saying that spam musabi is an All-American food like hot dogs and hamburgers because they eat spam musabi in Hawaii.
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Old 07-08-2014, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,033,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
I'm Mexican, and born in Mexico City. You will never find a burrito in Mexico City, unless Chipotle or some American chain decides to move there.

And Arizona would be the last place I would go to learn about Mexican food. This is exactly why we're having this conversation; because people in the SW U.S. are always conflating their cuisine with traditional Mexican cuisine. They forget that the northern half of Mexico is almost empty, and their proximity to the country doesn't mean they're actually close to where people live.


Not true. I've been to Sonora and burritos aren't common. Certainly in Hermosillo, burritos aren't part of the regular cuisine. It's the same tacos/tortas as in most of Mexico. Maybe some Americans brought burritos south, but people aren't eating them in Hermosillo for the most part.

And Sonora is a tiny proportion of Mexico. Obviously a state of 2 million isn't relevent in determining whether a country of 120 million is eating burritos. It would be like saying that spam musabi is an All-American food like hot dogs and hamburgers because they eat spam musabi in Hawaii.
At no point did I suggest burritos were a fixture of Mexican food and I pointed out that they were rare all over Mexico especially, I'm sure, in Mexico City. Sonora's two million and the over two million Mexicans/Chicanos in Arizona may seem irrelevant to the people in the capital but they're there, have been for hundreds of years, and have been making burritos. The point of my earlier post is that to dismiss burritos as American food is inaccurate and that its origin comes from Mexico. Whether you call this food Tex-mex, New Mexican, or Sonoran, borderland food exists and you can't say it's all-American or distinctly Mexican.

Btw, you can get Oaxacan, Yucatan style dishes, DF style, and many other styles of food from Mexico in Phoenix, with little to no cheese.
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Old 07-08-2014, 02:07 PM
 
Location: O.C.
2,821 posts, read 2,749,886 times
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I know burritos aren't Mexican but they are served at every Mexican restaurant around. This list has no places in Santa Ana, CA or San Diego, two places with the best burritos on earth. This list is a joke.
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:17 PM
 
116 posts, read 174,400 times
Reputation: 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbell75 View Post
I know burritos aren't Mexican but they are served at every Mexican restaurant around. This list has no places in Santa Ana, CA or San Diego, two places with the best burritos on earth. This list is a joke.
Southern Californians seems to have a real problem admitting that for the most part their burritos are inferior to Bay Area burritos.
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