U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-01-2014, 11:46 AM
 
10,556 posts, read 13,116,292 times
Reputation: 6356

Advertisements

The City of Chicago doesn't have tornados.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-01-2014, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,315,951 times
Reputation: 4270
That's not true, at least, not the suburbs. Violent storms and tornadoes can definitely strike Chicagoland, and it isn't even that uncommon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,397,432 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
That's not true, at least, not the suburbs. Violent storms and tornadoes can definitely strike Chicagoland, and it isn't even that uncommon.
As I noted earlier in the thread, I drove through the western Chicago burbs just a couple weekends ago and there were funnel clouds all over the place. The city itself, probably true; many of the burbs, not true.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 02:00 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,372,703 times
Reputation: 10924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
That's not true, at least, not the suburbs. Violent storms and tornadoes can definitely strike Chicagoland, and it isn't even that uncommon.
Storms yes, tornadoes - no.

Chicagoland is thousands of square miles. There have been tornadoes in the past, but they're certainaly extremely rare at any given point.

Tornadoes going back to the 1800's have been recorded about once every 45 years within the city of Chicago. For the six county area, there are on average 2 tornado touchdowns each year, although most are small. Significant tornadoes of F2 or larger, those that can start causing damage, show up in the area about once every 2 years, although most tend to cause little actual damage as they aren't going through highly urban areas. The coverage area studied is around 4,200 square miles.

It's been 24 years since a tornado death in the Chicago metro area (Illinois portions at least), most people here don't seem to care at all. The news hardly breaks in for the warnings and no one seems to take any sort of precaution. That's a far cry from growing up in Iowa where people seemed to care much much more about safety and to keep an eye on tornado warnings.

Last edited by Chicago60614; 07-01-2014 at 02:13 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 02:05 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,048,618 times
Reputation: 2543
Midwest and tornadoes go together like Ma and apple pie.

Move west of the Rockies or to New England if you want to completely avoid tornadoes, especially the violent/deadly ones.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 02:13 PM
 
2,478 posts, read 4,867,901 times
Reputation: 4488
This thread is a good example of how my new system that breaks down the Midwest is superior to the current lable that paints too broad a strip. You'll note and rave about the simplicity and ease of navigation. It is located below the answer to your question. As for an answer to your question OP, I suggest: Region 2a1, Region 2c89471, Region 2kzire907431-867-5309 or Region 4z-mm-1.



Legend

Region 1a: Northern 1/4 Illinois, East 1/4 Iowa, and the closest 100 million gallons of Lake Michigan and I-69's service roads.
Region 1b: 1/8 Northern Missouri, 1/8 Southern Iowa and the town of Quincy, IL and St Louis.
Region 1b1a: West 1/16 Indiana, 200 mile by 200 mile Central 1/16 Illinois and all goats but not the farms that said goats or their owners.
Region 1c3z: Central 1/8 Indiana, Indianapolis minus North Indianapolis and most of I-69, minus the service roads.
Region 1e5x: Southern 1/32 Indiana, Bob Sacamanta's 40 acre lot in North Kentucky, excluding the 7-11, but including Mrs Jones's 2 acre watermelon patch.
Region 1g7o: 1/45 Southern Illinois, 1/32 West Illinois

Region 2a1: Minnesota minus it's sports teams
Region 2c89471: Minnesota's sports teams.
Region 2kzire907431-867-5309: Wisconsin land south of Hwy 14 and west of Hwy 61. The 7-11 next to Mrs Jones 2 acre watermelon patch.
Region 2bbccddeeff: Greenbay, WI, Cleveland, OH, Pittsburgh, PA, the top 1/2 of Michigan minus the Traverse City State Forest.

Region 3-55-6-18akd: Michigans Traverse City State Forest, 1/2 East Indiana, 1/16 Western Ohio, Kalamazoo, Michigan
Region 3-66-7-19akd: Western, PA, all the farms excluding the goats, of Central Illinois, 200 million gallons of Lake Michigan adjacent to Region 1a.
Region 3-77-9-22bcd: North Indianapolis, whatever's left of Indiana, Western, NY minus Buffalo.
Region 3-99-0-15lolol: Eastern Ohio, Eastern PA, West West Virginia, Buffalo, NY
Region 4z-mm-1: Lake Huron
Region 4x-nn-2: Wisconsin Land North of Hwy 14, West of 61 until I-90 but not including I-90
Region 4m-dd-yyyy: I-90, Northern and Eastern Iowa. Wisconsin west of I-90.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 02:15 PM
 
Location: N E B R A S K A
110 posts, read 116,098 times
Reputation: 124
Where I live in Lincoln, NE, I've never seen a tornado. We've had tornados all around us but Lincoln itself has never been hit. I've seen tornados before on long drives through Nebraska but never in or around my hometown.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,397,432 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
Midwest and tornadoes go together like Ma and apple pie.

Move west of the Rockies or to New England if you want to completely avoid tornadoes, especially the violent/deadly ones.
Or along Lake Michigan in Wisconsin, if you've been reading the thread at all. That's where I live. Never been anywhere near one, outside of being out of the state. Where I grew up, there are no historical instances of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,520 posts, read 7,461,791 times
Reputation: 10922
Northern MN, northern WI and northern MI are the only parts of the Midwest that get less tornados. Even there they happen, just a lot less then areas a few hundred miles to the south. Living in the Midwest means living with the possibility of tornadoes. Each region has its threats, tornados are the burden a Midwesterner must live with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2014, 04:40 PM
 
10,556 posts, read 13,116,292 times
Reputation: 6356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
That's not true, at least, not the suburbs. Violent storms and tornadoes can definitely strike Chicagoland, and it isn't even that uncommon.
I said City of Chicago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top