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Old 07-07-2014, 02:33 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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List of United States cities by population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

According to the latest estimates in 2013 nearly all US central cities that are in the top 100 are adding population. This is after decades where most were losing population.

I think this is a watershed type of moment for urban America. Though the raw numbers don't show the inner demographics I would guess this is largely due to millennials preferring urban environments over suburban ones.

The only top 100 cities still losing population...

Detroit
Cleveland
Buffalo
Toledo
Baton Rouge
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Old 07-07-2014, 02:55 PM
 
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StL is in the top 100 and also lost population. Granted, it was really only 1,000 people, and estimates aren't always right (last decade they constantly estimated that StL's population was growing-whoops), but as far as we know it hasn't gained. Plus, there are a lot of cities where the population is growing because they have annexed their suburbs. Chances are, those inner cities are still facing a slow decline.

However, that doesn't mean that a radical shift towards urban environments isn't on the horizon. As the American household size shrinks, and more people shift towards single and/or childless living, and as the economy changes, people will begin downsizing. The giant McMansions of the suburbs will fall out of favor because they will become too big for the modern American family. Bigger houses will become unnecessary for the average American. The same will apply for bigger cars, or really any cars at all. Driving has officially lost its luster for many Americans. Traffic has rendered the independent mobility of the automobile moot in many areas, and thus more and more people will be inclined towards transit, biking, and walking over automobile exclusivity as driving becomes less attractive in closer quarters. Cities will certainly make a comeback. Not necessarily at the expense of existing suburbs, but the day will come when they are on a more equal economic, political, and social footing with their suburbs.
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Old 07-07-2014, 02:58 PM
 
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Good thread. I think this speaks to the rapidly growing population of immigrants coming to America, particularly of Mexican and Latin American origin. This is why you see the fastest growing cities in the West and the South.
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Old 07-07-2014, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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The poor population is growing, so you're going to see the cheaper metros grow as families seek places they can afford.
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Old 07-07-2014, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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A lot of this boils down to jobs. Rural areas don't have good jobs. Urban areas do.
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Old 07-08-2014, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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Minneapolis proper has been growing at a pretty healthy clip since the 2010 census, and it has led Twin Cities municipalities for new housing starts every year since 2007 (prior to that new housing starts had been led by various suburbs from the '50s to 2007). Almost everything being built in the city is high end/luxury, so I don't think immigrants and poor people are driving the growth. Here, money is moving back into the city, pushing poverty into the 'burbs.
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:20 AM
 
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It's not really true, though. The problem is that they changed the business rules for the annual Census estimates, but didn't change the business rules for the decennial Census count. So you will probably see the same thing that happened last decade, where everyone thought city propers were growing, and then were shocked when the decennial Census was released.

And, keep in mind, these are very rough estimates, using very small sample sizes. The margin of error is so much so that half the cities on the list could have declining populations (not saying it's true, but certainly within the margin of error of the sample size).
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:52 AM
 
21,207 posts, read 30,420,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tor_Nado View Post
Good thread. I think this speaks to the rapidly growing population of immigrants coming to America, particularly of Mexican and Latin American origin. This is why you see the fastest growing cities in the West and the South.
I disagree. The reason one sees rapidly growing cities in the South and West are mainly from those displaced from the economy in other cities with higher costs of living and a job market largely dependent on a well educated and/or highly skilled workforce, while cities in the South and West that are showing sizable growth are seeing it via rapidly expanding Service Sector employment which is the opposite.
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Old 07-08-2014, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Denver
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No way is Baton Rouge losing population.
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:17 AM
 
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So the title of this is Top 100 Core cities. If you're saying 95/100 of the top 100, a full 1/3rd or more of those cities are sunbelt suburbs which do not count as core cities. Or did you actually go back and track down the ACTUAL top 100 core cities?
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