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Old 07-13-2014, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvin Ma View Post
Christians are pro separation of church and state too and you haven't shown where church and state are not separated.

You can't even give one example of a theocracy type of legislation.
You keep on knockin' but you can't come in.
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Old 07-13-2014, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,749,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvin Ma View Post
BTW, I never heard anything good about eastern Washington.
Yeah. It's horrible. Stay away at all costs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvin Ma View Post
At least you are free though, from what, we aren't sure.
From you?

Last edited by Bobloblawslawblog; 07-13-2014 at 11:16 PM..
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Old 07-13-2014, 11:51 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,046,833 times
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Aside from Mormons and Mexican-Americans, I find the people of Phoenix, AZ to be among the least religious of anyplace I've ever lived. Sure, there are lots of religious people here in the Valley, but religion is largely absent from the general discourse of the area. I even find people working in service positions such as bankers, grocery store clerks, et al. to be a lot less likely to wish someone a "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Easter" than anyplace I've ever lived, even in my heavily Jewish community in FL.
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Old 07-14-2014, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
I live in Washington state (not Seattle). Do the research for yourself. I'm sorry if you took what I said as "commentary about the South". It wasn't. Seems you're being a bit overly touchy about that. I'm originally from the South, and I understand that not all Southern states are the same. However, it would be ignorant to discount the notion that religion has a huge influence in most red state's politics and lawmaking. And there are many red states that aren't in the South.
I live in Indiana and see about as many churches here as I do in Nashville. They are everywhere. Religion is more subdued where I lived in IA, but it is there. When I was in Boston for work, there were very few signs of religion anywhere. I'd call it a nearly godless area.
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Old 07-14-2014, 09:08 AM
 
12,636 posts, read 10,487,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Christmas is by far the biggest religious holiday in blue states just like it is everywhere else in America.
Unfortunately Christmas is not a good example as non-Christians celebrate it (sometimes Easter too). I have a friend from Southern California who was raised with no affiliated religion (and her family are atheists) yet she has celebrated these Christian holidays her whole life, decorations, presents, and all. She claims she didn't even know Christmas was religious until high school. It is mostly for the presents, and her mom was still giving her Easter gifts in college while mine stopped in middle school. I know it probably shouldn't, but as a Catholic it does bug me. Our holidays are not games for everyone else. But it is what it is.
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Old 07-14-2014, 09:36 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
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Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Unfortunately Christmas is not a good example as non-Christians celebrate it (sometimes Easter too). I have a friend from Southern California who was raised with no affiliated religion (and her family are atheists) yet she has celebrated these Christian holidays her whole life, decorations, presents, and all. She claims she didn't even know Christmas was religious until high school. It is mostly for the presents, and her mom was still giving her Easter gifts in college while mine stopped in middle school. I know it probably shouldn't, but as a Catholic it does bug me. Our holidays are not games for everyone else. But it is what it is.

"Your" holidays are also not completely yours. Keep in mind the well-known pagan origins of Christmas and Easter. These were never really Christian in origin but adopted by the Christian religion and infused with some of its elements. I do think these holidays will continue to thrive even in a Postchristian society as tradition is important to people and many of the themes are not strictly religious in nature. The holidays mark special parts of the years, and when traditions dictate conviviality and celebration, there is no reason to abandon them. Now, all that said, if you are referring to the commercialization of Christmas more than anything else, then I fully agree. That is lamentable in so many ways.
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Old 07-14-2014, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Work in NYC - Live in Philly - Transplant from Miami
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I think the more educated you are, the more godless you are.
So expect college towns to be godless.
Also expect big cities to be godless.
I am from Miami, and now live in Philadelphia. Both cities are pretty "godless".
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Old 07-14-2014, 10:23 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,422 posts, read 18,316,727 times
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How about those that believe in God but don't follow the herd mentality and dogmatic approach of many religions? I don't practice or belong to any particular religion, but that doesn't make me "Godless" and I'd prefer not to be pigeonholed into that category as I don't really relate to many aetheist beliefs either. Having a belief in God doesn't have to be a black and white belief complex between the choice of aetheism and organized religion. Fortunately in the Southwest which I feel is pretty moderate I don't really feel any pressure between the us vs. them mentality of it all.
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Old 07-14-2014, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,113,945 times
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New England, parts of the upper Midwest and pretty much the entire west coast. Vermont and New Hampshire have the lowest church attendance rates in the nation.

The South is basically Jesus Land. I don't care what southerners say. It IS Jesus Land, and if you travel in the South, being from another region, the difference is noticeable. You will see huge towering white crucifixes every 50 miles driving on the interstate. There are many more Christian radio stations. Many more mega churches. And many more politicians who love to mix their personal religious views with public policy. I also spent a month living in Charlotte, and the difference -- albeit not annoying or anything -- was noticeable, coming from New England.

With that said, even an atheist can live just fine in the South, and it shouldn't be a deterrent. I'm just telling it like it is, being from New England. People here rarely discuss religion or go to church. There's like one Christian radio station. Mega churches are rare and politicians don't inject religion with public policy.
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Old 07-14-2014, 10:42 AM
 
12,636 posts, read 10,487,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snj90 View Post
if you are referring to the commercialization of Christmas more than anything else, then I fully agree. That is lamentable in so many ways.
That's a big part of it, yes. IMO people who weren't raised Catholic/Christian, or any religion at all, and especially whose family doesn't believe in God, should not celebrate religious holidays like Christmas. It would be like me celebrating Hannukah. Why would I? I'm not Jewish. Imagine a non-Muslim (like me) fasting for Ramadan. To me, that's equal to a non-Christian celebrating Christmas. One reason non-Christians celebrate Christmas is probably because of the commercialization of it, and yes, I think it's sad and kind of unfair. Christmas is celebrated for a reason, and no it is not gifts, which is usually why nonreligious people celebrate it. Decorating the house is cute and fun, I get it, so is exchanging presents, but for one to say they are celebrating Christmas when they do just that is ridiculous. It's just another excuse to buy/give gifts in the name of a religion (which is why it is commercialized - money), a holiday that the religious take seriously for an important reason. When my friend told me she celebrates though her family is not Christian or religious at all, I was kind of floored. Same with Easter, and still getting Easter gifts at 20 years old. For her parents to not even tell her Christmas is religious, at all in her whole life, is disrespectful IMO. If you want to celebrate it anyway no one can stop you, you have that right, but I think you should at least be respectful to the religion and explain to your children it is a religious holiday celebrated for a specific reason that you are celebrating for other reasons (presents and fun decorations and food and family). Right or wrong, it really did bug me and that was my instinctual response to hearing it. I can't help it. I didn't tell her how wrong I think it is, I didn't want to fight and it's just not worth it anyway, but I really do think it's wrong. Sorry. Sadly, though, since Christmas has become so unreligious and made all about the buying of gifts, I can see why anyone would celebrate it. I just don't agree with it.

In NJ, I don't know if we're "godless." This state is largely made up of, if people are religious, Roman Catholics and Jews. There is one Catholic Church in my town, one Jewish temple, and a couple of other Protestant churches (I think one is Episcopalian, one is Lutheran). By far the most popular is the Roman Catholic church, with a pretty impressive following and an attached Catholic school kids from all over the county go to.
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