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Old 08-26-2018, 04:36 PM
 
Location: planet earth
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Sicilians are not Italians.
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Old 08-26-2018, 04:43 PM
 
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Southern Italy yes, Sicily in specific probably not.
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Old 08-26-2018, 04:55 PM
 
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I think no chance that most are from Sicily. Most are from southern Italy though, because it was the poorest part of the country and thus spurred more immigration to the US. Pittsburgh is the most Italian major city in the states by percentage, and most of them came from Abruzzo and Calabria I'm pretty sure. and thats what my ancestry is. Given that they came over in the Ellis island era which also had the large immigration to NYC, Philly, NJ, etc I would think a large portion were from those same regions of Italy as well.

Last edited by _Buster; 08-26-2018 at 05:12 PM..
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Old 08-26-2018, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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Part of my family came from the mountains east of Naples, the others came from the mountains north of Venice. While some stayed in New York, most of them moved to Colorado where they worked the coal mines from Trinidad to Pueblo, Colo Spgs, up to Denver and Boulder because it was the most reliable work they could get. In the early 20th century, Italians weren't looked at too positively by the predominate WASP society of the time.
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Old 08-26-2018, 09:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
Sicilians are not Italians.
Please explain.
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Old 08-27-2018, 01:32 AM
 
Location: SoCal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Interesting question. It very well could be.

My grandmother's family also went to Argentina, some even came here first then migrated to Argentina so I have Italian family in Argentina. Interesting stuff.
Very interesting stuff! many are not aware of the italian presence in South America even the spanish in Argentina sounds italian with 51% of people there of Italian descent.
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Old 08-27-2018, 03:03 AM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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You learn something new everyday. I had no idea that the majority of Italian-Americans trace their ancestry to Southern Italy.
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Old 08-27-2018, 07:51 AM
 
Location: SoCal
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Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
You learn something new everyday. I had no idea that the majority of Italian-Americans trace their ancestry to Southern Italy.
Same! now I'm curious about all the different European countries and where certain people went to certain places. the same thing with mexican immigrants today.
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Old 08-27-2018, 07:57 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Most Italian immigrants(over 80 %) came from the Southern Italian regions of Sicily, Campania, Abruzzo and Calabria--but I'm not sure how many percentage-wise were from Sicily alone. It's more so Southern Italian than just Sicilian immigrants(which has its own unique culture) that had a big imprint in the US. The culture and food of Napoli was very influential in shaping what Americans think of as Italian-American food. Though there were immigrants from all over Italy--where I grew up there were descendents of Genoese fisherman who were the backbone of the local Italian-American community. I knew other people whose ancestors came over in the early 1900s from Piedmonte or Central or Northern Italian regions.
My Italian relatives all came from Piedmonte around the turn of the century. They settled in Northern California around the Stockton-Lodi area. Groups of individuals from the same geographic region tended to glom together out of a sense of familiarity, I think. We tend to think of Italian immigrants as being from Sicily because that seems to be what is publicized in popular culture i.e. "The Godfather", and other hollywood movies. I am certain if you looked closely, you would discover in the background, just as many Italians from other regions of Italy. Although, I could understand if Northern Italians did not immigrate to the US. Northern Italy looks just about as close to paradise and you can get.
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Old 08-27-2018, 11:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
Very interesting stuff! many are not aware of the italian presence in South America even the spanish in Argentina sounds italian with 51% of people there of Italian descent.
It's actually closer to 2/3rds of Argentina's population that has Italian origins. They literally are Spanish speaking Italians

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Argentines


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zlq--fjE7ZQ

Yeah, listening to Rioplatense Spanish, you can definitely hear the Italian influence. Before the Italian immigrants fully learned Spanish, they infused a lot of the local Castillian with Italianisms which were called "Lunfardo".

You can still hear a lot of these phrases today.

https://youtu.be/lG37Oh1Mowk

Video is a joke video but you get the drift on how easy it is for a lot of Argentine Spanish speakers to switch to standard Italian. The prevailing stereotype about Rioplatense Spanish is that it's "Spanish spoken with an Italian accent".

For one reason or another, a similar thing never happened to Italian Americans. Most likely because of how different English and Italian are as languages.gl
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