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Old 08-28-2018, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
Please explain.
Many Sicilians will insist on being called just that--instead of Italian. There is a distinct culture, food-it became part of Italy in 1860.
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Old 08-28-2018, 09:51 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Many Sicilians will insist on being called just that--instead of Italian. There is a distinct culture, food-it became part of Italy in 1860.
All of Italy became part of Italy in 1860 (or was it 1861?)

Italy was comprised of several states with their own dialects of Italian. Italy did not become a sovereign nation until shortly before the mass emigration that brought them to the US and elsewhere.
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Old 08-28-2018, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
All of Italy became part of Italy in 1860 (or was it 1861?)

Italy was comprised of several states with their own dialects of Italian. Italy did not become a sovereign nation until shortly before the mass emigration that brought them to the US and elsewhere.

Ahh yeah that's right. I suppose Sicily was even more distinct being an island.
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Old 10-12-2018, 10:43 AM
 
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My family settled in Westchester in New York in the late 1800's. They were from a town north of Bergamo in northern Italy, almost in Switzerland. Northern Italy (south Tyrol) used be part of Austria.
They speak a dialect that is nothing close to Italian. A movie called "The Tree of Wooden Clogs' depicts the life and language; it doesn't seem Italian at all compared to what Americans think of as Italian.
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Old 10-12-2018, 11:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roskybosky View Post
My family settled in Westchester in New York in the late 1800's. They were from a town north of Bergamo in northern Italy, almost in Switzerland. Northern Italy (south Tyrol) used be part of Austria.
They speak a dialect that is nothing close to Italian. A movie called "The Tree of Wooden Clogs' depicts the life and language; it doesn't seem Italian at all compared to what Americans think of as Italian.
This community/school district just outside of Syracuse has quite a few people that descend from that portion of Italy: Village of Solvay – 1100 Woods Rd Solvay, NY 13209
Solvay Union Free School District

A club in the village: https://www.solvaytyrolclub.org/
https://www.facebook.com/TyrolClubOfSOlvay/
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0593...6!9m2!1b1!2i38

Currently, about 28% of the village and school district is Italian.
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Old 10-12-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roskybosky View Post
My family settled in Westchester in New York in the late 1800's. They were from a town north of Bergamo in northern Italy, almost in Switzerland. Northern Italy (south Tyrol) used be part of Austria.
They speak a dialect that is nothing close to Italian. A movie called "The Tree of Wooden Clogs' depicts the life and language; it doesn't seem Italian at all compared to what Americans think of as Italian.
My husband's grandfather was from up there. When he and grandmother visited in the 1950s, she bought a pair of wooden soled low boots for her little grandson. I have them.
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Old 10-15-2018, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
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My Italian ancestors were from Central Italy.
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Old 04-01-2019, 02:01 PM
 
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The posters who stated that most Northern Italians emigrated to either Brazil or Argentina are spot on. I had an uncle through marriage who was Northern Italian. His family originated in Tuscany and his grandparents settled in Brazil, where his mother was born.


My uncle's mother's name was Brasilina, because her family wanted to name her in honor of the country of her birth.
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Old 04-01-2019, 03:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubb Rubb View Post
Yeah, most Italian-Americans in the USA came from Southern Italy. Northern Italians generally preferred Argentina and Brazil, though by raw numbers, they got more Southern Italians than the US did as well.

However, I feel like Italian-Americans have clung on more to the idea of being "Italian" than the ones who settled in Argentina and Brazil because the in the latter countries, they assimilated relatively quickly while here, it took until basically the late 20th century for most Italians to be assimilated here. Much of that is due to linguistic reasons. My favorite Spanish accent, for example, is Rioplatense (Argentinian/Uruguayan) because of all the Italianisms and sentence structure in it. Sao Paulo has a similar thing going on with Portuguese. However, a similar phenomenon didn't happen in English.
I love being able to hear the Italian influences on the Portenos and Paulistanos. They definitely contributed to those accents a lot, obviously because of the Romance language similarities.

I wouldn't say their influence is nonexistent on people in the Northeast, though. I'm not an expert on dialectical influences, but I wonder if the concentrations of Italians affected certain accents. I.e. parts of the NYC Metro with large Italian influences tend to have stronger and/or different accents. As for actual words (how Rioplatense infuses Italian vocab, sentence structure, conjugation, etc.), the only thing I can think of is "yous". The only ethnic group I've heard refer to a group of people as "yous" is the Italian-Americans. Whether that's due to their conjugation/sentence structure (doubt it based on the Italian plural forms) or a simplification of the English language (adding an -s to make anything plural), I'm not sure.

Let's be real, though. Any city with a sizable and noticeable Italian population is often a city with a louder, more in-your-face culture. That's Italians from every region, and Southern Europeans as a whole.

As for this thread, if you had one guess on where an Italian-American's family is from in the NYC/NJ/Philly region, you better be going with Sicily as your first choice. They might not be the majority of all Italian immigrants to the US or the region, but they're often the single largest ancestral group.

As for the other poster wondering about Sicily not being Italian, politics aside, check out their languages. Someone who speaks Italian at a basic level (like me) has a very difficult time understanding someone speaking Sicilian. My friends nonna speaks to me in a mix of English, Italian, and Sicilian. I get the first two, but half the words are Sicilian and I have to fill in the blanks of Sicilian with what I think is accurate. It's almost never right. But I respond in Italian to her and she understands everything.
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Old 04-01-2019, 11:15 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA>Tijuana, BC>San Antonio, TX
4,172 posts, read 4,153,062 times
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I always liked the casual lessons on being Italian from the Sopranos, like Furio's talk on his disdain for Christopher Columbus. To me, Furio always looked like the type of Italian that went to Argentina and not the type that came to the US.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbbMIg-Aw8E
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