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Old 07-25-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
Reputation: 2895

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Wisconsin is in the Midwest, and is therefore, completely flat, if surrounding states such as IL, MI and IA are an indicator. I don't understand why people in this forum try to promote it as a state having interesting topography and terrain. Really people? Really?
Wisconsin has the majority of the Driftless, for one example, which is about a quarter of the state. The glaciers missed the region, and it's uniformly HILLY throughout the entire region, not flat. Here is a winter aerial shot (or you could just use "terrain" in google maps):



There are chunks of the Northwoods that are also hilly. Here's Wausau:


Here's the Penokee Range, formerly a mountain range bigger than the Rockies. It's been in the news quite a bit due to the Gov wanting to allow the biggest strip mine in the US:


And so on. Iowa also has a chunk of the Driftless (IA on the left):
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Old 07-25-2014, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Had a chance to visit a little bit of the driftless region in Wisconsin this week (basically one day). Sadly, I did not get any chances to stop and take pictures of the best scenery that I witnessed. It is a beautiful and unique area and definitely lived up to the hype that it has received on this forum!

I did get one picture of this barn on a hillside in Wisconsin:
Glad you had a good time! I find that I often just drive through the area and forget to take pictures, because it's so fun just to drive around all the backroads. Constantly twisting and turning and going up and down in elevation due to all the "hidden valleys" you go through.

Wisconsin is the "least flat" Midwestern state: http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/ne...ead.png?n2ac3b

This doesn't mean that there are mountains, it means that it has varied topography. Michigan scores pretty well, too, largely due to the UP (Huron Mtns, Porcupine Mtns, etc.). Minnesota has mountains in the Iron Range, but the vast plains in the western (and southern) part of the state take the score down quite a bit.
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Old 07-25-2014, 11:40 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,452,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Glad you had a good time! I find that I often just drive through the area and forget to take pictures, because it's so fun just to drive around all the backroads. Constantly twisting and turning and going up and down in elevation due to all the "hidden valleys" you go through.

Wisconsin is the "least flat" Midwestern state: http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/ne...ead.png?n2ac3b

This doesn't mean that there are mountains, it means that it has varied topography. Michigan scores pretty well, too, largely due to the UP (Huron Mtns, Porcupine Mtns, etc.). Minnesota has mountains in the Iron Range, but the vast plains in the western (and southern) part of the state take the score down quite a bit.
Yes, I would agree with that assessment. Wisconsin was the most consistently hilly/varied state that I've been to in the Midwest.

Michigan actually has non-flat areas in the lower peninsula, too. The northern half of the lower peninsula has some nice rolling upland/plateau areas that you can see in brown in the map below. There you can find terrain that looks like this, at the Boyne Highlands resort:



There are also certain parts of the southern lower peninsula that are more varied and less flat. There is an area that starts north of Detroit and runs toward the southwest that has small hills and lots of lakes (also can be seen on the map). The southern reaches of that area, near Jackson, are known as the Irish Hills: Irish Hills - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia There are similar, less concentrated areas of rolling terrain scattered throughout other parts of the southern lower peninsula as well. But Wisconsin is definitely more varied overall, from what I saw.

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Old 07-25-2014, 12:55 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,942,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Oklahoma is not midwestern, period. The title of this thread is "Scenic Areas on East Coast/Midwest." How much more simple could the OP be? Arkansas and Oklahoma are not in the Midwest.



We are correcting your mistakes, which are misleading and off-topic for this thread. You made a mistake - admit it or don't, but get over it already, please. They're nice pictures, as I've stated several times now, but you didn't label them correctly and I simply wanted people on this thread to know which were part of the Midwest and which are not, since you didn't label them by state.

An interesting area of Wisconsin is the central sands area, which at one point was a glacial lake dotted with hundreds of islands. When the glaciers receded, the lake drained and left the only collection of buttes and mesas east of the Mississippi. The plain/former lake bottom is very flat (and contains the majority of the country's cranberry bogs), but it's dotted with hundreds of buttes/mesas (referred to locally as "mounds" or "bluffs" or even "rock"). The difference is it's a humid landscape, so they are covered in trees and vegetation.

Roche-A-Cri:


Mill Bluff State Park:


Levis/Trow (some of the best mountain biking in the Midwest):


Hundreds of roadside rock formations like Ship Rock:


Etc. Just an oddball thing that most people don't know about beyond locals...though the interstate between Madison and Minneapolis (closer to Madison) has some examples along the road.

We are not complaining, YOU ARE. Mistakes are unintentional... I intentionally added those pics because the I thought the OP might be interested in them as well.

You are the one who can't stop complaining, and asking others to drop it. Usually you seem really reasonable but for some reason you are REALLY butthurt that I included other areas on the fringe of what the OP asked for (knowingly) because based on the overall tone of the original post, it seemed like they might be interested in them AS WELL.

You did NOT simply point out the states they are in, you continue to complain incessantly. You started the complaints, it is up to you to drop it.

Myself and another poster already explained that our brains are able to go beyond the literal and pick up on the subtext of words... if you can't that is your problem. Meanwhile, the rep keeps rolling in from that post while you and ONE other person complains.
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Old 07-25-2014, 12:57 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,942,274 times
Reputation: 1858
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Wisconsin is in the Midwest, and is therefore, completely flat, if surrounding states such as IL, MI and IA are an indicator. I don't understand why people in this forum try to promote it as a state having interesting topography and terrain. Really people? Really?
Uh, you haven't seen flat if you think MI, IA, and especially WI are flat..... Iowa is gently rolling hills through and through, and the others have borderline mountains in their borders...
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Old 07-25-2014, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,399,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Myself and another poster already explained that our brains are able to go beyond the literal and pick up on the subtext of words... if you can't that is your problem. Meanwhile, the rep keeps rolling in from that post while you and ONE other person complains.
Yes...you and esteemed C-D poster JerseyGirl415 have formed a coalition and we're all very impressed.

michigan83 - You're right, there are lots of nice hilly areas in Lower Michigan. I guess my mind instantly goes to the larger and more stunning UP ranges like the Huron Mountains, Keweenaw, and Porcupine Mountains, all of which have Lake Superior as the backdrop.

This is definitely one of the most beautiful areas of the Midwest (Lake of the Clouds in the Porkies):
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Old 07-25-2014, 01:26 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,942,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Yes...you and esteemed C-D poster JerseyGirl415 have formed a coalition and we're all very impressed.
Yeah, just like we are really unimpressed with you and michigan83 raising a stink when FAR more people appreciate the post....


Back on topic, since I can't stand to do nothing but reply to whining all day:

Lake of the Ozarks:







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Old 07-25-2014, 03:06 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,452,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Yes...you and esteemed C-D poster JerseyGirl415 have formed a coalition and we're all very impressed.

michigan83 - You're right, there are lots of nice hilly areas in Lower Michigan. I guess my mind instantly goes to the larger and more stunning UP ranges like the Huron Mountains, Keweenaw, and Porcupine Mountains, all of which have Lake Superior as the backdrop.

This is definitely one of the most beautiful areas of the Midwest (Lake of the Clouds in the Porkies):
Yes, those are definitely where the most stunning views in Michigan are!

I just happen to have a few that I took in the Huron Mountains near Marquette:







Oh, and for good measure, here are a couple I took in the northern lower peninsula:



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Old 07-25-2014, 03:43 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,514,849 times
Reputation: 17601
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Yes...you and esteemed C-D poster JerseyGirl415 have formed a coalition and we're all very impressed.
Leave me out of it. I have formed no "coalition" with anyone. I had one post about it, and it wasn't even a direct comment on your silly little picture argument. Don't put words in my mouth. All I said was that I took the OP to mean "anything not in the West" by the tone of the post. I don't care what the actual question said, it is clear the OP doesn't know much about areas of the country besides the West and is now asking about them.

I didn't even look at the pictures the poster you are arguing with posted. I just don't see why it is such a big deal they were posted to begin with. I know Oklahoma is not Midwestern, all I said was I have seen people argue here in city-data that it is - but I also have seen a lot of (ridiculous) arguments on here. My point: not the first time I've seen OK added to "Midwest."

Calling me "esteemed," I sense sarcasm. I have only had very few interactions with you, and you only joined last month.
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Old 08-17-2014, 02:20 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,468,006 times
Reputation: 10927
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Wisconsin is in the Midwest, and is therefore, completely flat, if surrounding states such as IL, MI and IA are an indicator. I don't understand why people in this forum try to promote it as a state having interesting topography and terrain. Really people? Really?

Maybe you should go see the place yourself, it is not as flat as you think. There is some really pretty scenery in Wisconsin, as there is in IA and MI. There is more to the Midwest than your "flyover country" stereotypes. Wisconsin is an overlooked gem of the USA, filled with lakes and woods it is such a nice state. Michigan's northern half has some stunning beauty, especially Great Lakes shorelines. The Mississippi valley is also beautiful. A few weeks ago I was up on the Indiana/KY border and I thought the Ohio valley was really interesting place as well. Our nations history is deeply tied to the Ohio and Mississippi river valleys. The Midwest deserves respect, the countless cheapshots on CD toward the region are unfounded.
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