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Old 07-18-2014, 03:41 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,076 posts, read 5,448,737 times
Reputation: 4318

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I've taken nep to mean that fall colors are depressing because it means the leaves are about to die, then everything is brown for months (and white when it snows). I disagree, I love fall colors, but at the same time I can see that point. It is bittersweet to see such beautiful colors knowing what's to come is bare trees and a dead look for 4+ months.

I don't really mind the bare winter look, though. I genuinely love having 4 real, changing, different seasons. You always look forward to your favorite and can enjoy the change.
I have also come to appreciate the bare winter look! Around here it is almost 100% deciduous trees, and until recently I didn't like the "bare" look. Lately, though, I have found a subtle beauty in it. It took a long time for that to happen. But it's better that I learned to appreciate it, because the trees are bare for almost 6 months here.
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Old 07-18-2014, 03:46 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,318 posts, read 21,881,811 times
Reputation: 33476
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I've taken nep to mean that fall colors are depressing because it means the leaves are about to die, then everything is brown for months (and white when it snows). I disagree, I love fall colors, but at the same time I can see that point. It is bittersweet to see such beautiful colors knowing what's to come is bare trees and a dead look for 4+ months.

I don't really mind the bare winter look, though. I genuinely love having 4 real, changing, different seasons. You always look forward to your favorite and can enjoy the change.
I've taken Nep to mean..."Hey! everybody look at me! I am a kooky Contrarian"
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Old 07-18-2014, 03:46 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,076 posts, read 5,448,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
For the Midwest, here are the most scenic regions (in no order):

The Driftless of WI/IL/MN/IA is my personal favorite. Forget what someone said above about preferring the IL Driftless, the area is fairly similar throughout, with bluffs and valleys and streams and a farm/woods mix. IL only has one county in the Driftless, while the majority (85%) lies in Wisconsin. This is not discounting IA's and MN's beautiful Mississippi River frontage or inland areas, the whole of the Driftless is nice and a unique setting.
I am visiting the driftless region for the first time for a couple of days next week to visit a relative. I am really looking forward to it, especially after reading this post! I will basically be going west from Madison to the small town of Richland Center, WI, and then south to Belmont, WI. From what I can tell this will give me a good taste of the driftless region.
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Old 07-18-2014, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,396,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
I am visiting the driftless region for the first time for a couple of days next week to visit a relative. I am really looking forward to it, especially after reading this post! I will basically be going west from Madison to the small town of Richland Center, WI, and then south to Belmont, WI. From what I can tell this will give me a good taste of the driftless region.
A taste, yes. If possible, take some back roads, take a long route, etc. The highways are nice (and twisting/turning in their own right), but back roads often feel Appalacian (or whatever). That's where you'll see more Amish buggies and so on. You'll probably take Hwy 60 in for a bit along the Wisconsin River, and that's nice. If you have time, even a little stretch along Hwy 35 on the Mississippi is worth it. Or Spring Green Preserve, which is on the way to RC and is a sand prairie/desert filled with cacti and unusual animals for the area (pocket gophers, wolf spiders, snakes, and other arid creatures including lots of birds). But your relative will know the area, I'm sure - have fun!
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Old 07-18-2014, 08:14 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,076 posts, read 5,448,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
A taste, yes. If possible, take some back roads, take a long route, etc. The highways are nice (and twisting/turning in their own right), but back roads often feel Appalacian (or whatever). That's where you'll see more Amish buggies and so on. You'll probably take Hwy 60 in for a bit along the Wisconsin River, and that's nice. If you have time, even a little stretch along Hwy 35 on the Mississippi is worth it. Or Spring Green Preserve, which is on the way to RC and is a sand prairie/desert filled with cacti and unusual animals for the area (pocket gophers, wolf spiders, snakes, and other arid creatures including lots of birds). But your relative will know the area, I'm sure - have fun!
Thanks for the info! I wish I had more time to explore, but I'll do my best to get off the highways a little bit. I'll try to get a few pics to post as well.
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Old 07-18-2014, 08:37 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,076 posts, read 5,448,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hmm. Have you seen the rest of the Northeast well? Pennsylvania is the only part of the Northeast I haven't really seen (excluding Philly) so I'm wondering if you think it's better or if just from less time elsewhere.
I have done a reasonable amount of traveling in the northeast. I have driven across upstate New York and to the Adirondacks, have seen a good chunk of New Hampshire from the Massachusetts border up to the White Mountains, drove across Mass on I-90, saw a little bit of Maine, drove Maryland from east to west on the interstate, and a little bit of Virginia.

The thing that seemed remarkable to me about Pennsylvania was the sheer amount of hilly/mountainous terrain. It is a huge state by eastern U.S. standards, and it seems like almost all of it is hills/mountains. I also am a big fan of farm scenery, and PA is a good place to see dairy farms with historic barns on hillsides, etc.
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Old 07-18-2014, 09:06 AM
 
56,581 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
I have done a reasonable amount of traveling in the northeast. I have driven across upstate New York and to the Adirondacks, have seen a good chunk of New Hampshire from the Massachusetts border up to the White Mountains, drove across Mass on I-90, saw a little bit of Maine, drove Maryland from east to west on the interstate, and a little bit of Virginia.

The thing that seemed remarkable to me about Pennsylvania was the sheer amount of hilly/mountainous terrain. It is a huge state by eastern U.S. standards, and it seems like almost all of it is hills/mountains. I also am a big fan of farm scenery, and PA is a good place to see dairy farms with historic barns on hillsides, etc.
This can explain why you might not have seen the similar type of scenes in Upstate NY. I-90 runs through a flat portion of Upstate NY, for the most part and much of the hilly/mountainous terrain is a little bit south of I-90 or in/around the Adirondacks.

That reminds me of another place that you actually drive through on I-90: About the Refuge - Montezuma - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Montezuma | New York

Some more: Finger Lakes, New York | Song Lake | Tourism, Travel, and Recreational Information

Finger Lakes, New York | Lakes | Tully | Tourist Information

U.S. Route 20 in New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

U.S. Route 20 in New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York State Route 38 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York State Route 17 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York State Route 3 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ausable Chasm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ausable Chasm

Howe Caverns - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Howe Caverns

http://www.1000islands-clayton.com/v...02/welcome.jpg

Montauk Chamber of Commerce
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Old 07-18-2014, 09:30 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,076 posts, read 5,448,737 times
Reputation: 4318
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
This can explain why you might not have seen the similar type of scenes in Upstate NY. I-90 runs through a flat portion of Upstate NY, for the most part and much of the hilly/mountainous terrain is a little bit south of I-90 or in/around the Adirondacks.

That reminds me of another place that you actually drive through on I-90: About the Refuge - Montezuma - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Montezuma | New York

Some more: Finger Lakes, New York | Song Lake | Tourism, Travel, and Recreational Information

Finger Lakes, New York | Lakes | Tully | Tourist Information

U.S. Route 20 in New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

U.S. Route 20 in New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York State Route 38 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York State Route 17 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York State Route 3 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ausable Chasm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ausable Chasm

Howe Caverns - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Howe Caverns

http://www.1000islands-clayton.com/v...02/welcome.jpg

Montauk Chamber of Commerce
Yes, it is too bad that most of I-90 goes through a river valley/plains part of the state. It probably does skew my perception of New York, but I do realize that most of NY is more scenic than I-90. I did get a chance once to drive up to I-90 from Cortland, NY and I took back roads to the northwest. I ended up driving next to Owasco Lake and it was a beautiful area with great views from high above the lake. I also drove straight south from Buffalo once into PA, and there were some beautiful hills in that area as well. And, like I mentioned, I had a chance to visit the Adirondacks and that area was very impressive. Now that I really think about it, I certainly wouldn't rank PA ahead of upstate NY for scenery. I like them both a lot, but NY probably has a slight edge.

Here is a pic I took an hour south of Buffalo a couple of years ago:

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Old 07-18-2014, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,119,247 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
You are the only person in the entire world who thinks that.
Not true. I know quite a few people who agree with me. Fall signifies decline and decay. Spring signifies growth. I LOVE spring colors, but I prefer solid 100% green of summer time. And Fall is just depressing and cold in general.

In my valued opinion, I like summer the best, then winter, then spring, then fall. But I do appreciate all four seasons. But fall is my most hated season, because I do not find it appealing at all. Everything just looks ugly. For some reason, spring colors appear more lively, vibrant and lush than fall colors.
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Old 07-18-2014, 11:11 AM
 
56,581 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12499
Quote:
Originally Posted by michigan83 View Post
Yes, it is too bad that most of I-90 goes through a river valley/plains part of the state. It probably does skew my perception of New York, but I do realize that most of NY is more scenic than I-90. I did get a chance once to drive up to I-90 from Cortland, NY and I took back roads to the northwest. I ended up driving next to Owasco Lake and it was a beautiful area with great views from high above the lake. I also drove straight south from Buffalo once into PA, and there were some beautiful hills in that area as well. And, like I mentioned, I had a chance to visit the Adirondacks and that area was very impressive. Now that I really think about it, I certainly wouldn't rank PA ahead of upstate NY for scenery. I like them both a lot, but NY probably has a slight edge.

Here is a pic I took an hour south of Buffalo a couple of years ago:
Both are very similar. So, if you like one, you would probably like the other.

Also, speaking of Michigan and I'm surprised that either one of us didn't mention this, but the MSU campus is pretty scenic with the Red Cedar River running through the very green campus.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 07-18-2014 at 11:31 AM..
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