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View Poll Results: Would you rather be considered a native or a transplant?
Native 51 60.00%
Transplant 34 40.00%
Voters: 85. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-20-2014, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,752,033 times
Reputation: 2258

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Quote:
Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
I think it's more of a BS way to establish feelings of superiority from those who are more well-traveled. It seems like "natives" of places always seem to have funky and unwelcoming attitudes towards newcomers.
That's because most people are generally terrified of change. Imagine how the American Indians must have felt when white people started coming over in droves from Europe? People think they have some imaginary claim to certain cities/states/regions because their great-great-great granddaddy owned land there in the days before electricity. It's a fantasy world. The truth is, we're all free to move to, or away from, wherever the hell we choose in this country. It's all up for grabs. People can whine all they want about how "transplants are ruining everything and driving up the COL, and killing the local flavor, and blah-blah", but the truth is that's the way it's always been here. People need to get over their localism.
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Old 11-08-2015, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,123,720 times
Reputation: 7075
I have to say, that, currently living in an area as a transplant, it would be preferable to be a native. I become a little envious when I hear others talking about going to see their parents this weekend and stuff like that. Not that I was ever a family oriented person, but I guess I'm jealous of that other people have roots, and I do not, and likely will not. Personally, I don't enjoy being around my family because they argue all the time (in their extreme right wing household) and it makes me want to get the hell out of their house. But, I am envious that other people around here are natives and I am a transplant. Being a transplant is not as optimal as being a native, I'm sorry to report.
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Old 11-08-2015, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,017 posts, read 23,916,326 times
Reputation: 30885
Telephone's ringin'; it's your second cousin...

The Heart of Saturday Night - Tom Waits
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Old 05-24-2017, 11:00 PM
 
Location: DFW
6,800 posts, read 11,772,651 times
Reputation: 5149
I'm a lifelong transplant.. I immigrated with my family to the US over 30 years ago and have not lived in any single state for more than half of my life, let alone the same city. I feel more at home in places with a large % of transplants.
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Old 05-24-2017, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,402,528 times
Reputation: 2089
In Columbus, Ohio I find being a transplant from out of state it doesn't matter at all. In the central parts of the city it seems like the vast majority of people are from somewhere else mostly small town Ohio, suburban Cleveland/Cincinnati, out of state via OSU, the state government or some corporation.

I assume in the lower-income areas (a lot of the east and west sides) it be far easier to find people who were born and raised in the neighborhoods and never left.
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Old 05-25-2017, 02:37 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,201 posts, read 10,418,037 times
Reputation: 11214
Here, transplant. It's good to have seen/lived more than Middle America (not that it's a bad place to live). My former home (Bay Area), better to be a native..not that many natives can still afford to live there.
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Old 05-25-2017, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
Well I'm gonna be a transplant to Minnesota, but I'd rather be a native to Minnesota, but I don't have that privilege So it'll be like "I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!"

I'm happy being a transplant because of the aspect that I choose where to live and I'm choosing to live where I wanna be, but I consider it a luxury to be native of a place that you wanna call home for good. Florida, my homestate, is not that place for me.

To me its like, damn, I just moved here, but these people had the luxury (assuming they love it) of having grown up here and still live here. They have the childhood memories and longtime attachment that I'll never fully have. But, my kids will be able to have it.

Anywho, I love places especially small towns, where most people are native and everyone knows each other and there's so much character. Transplants are cool, I mean, I am one, but too many transplants really zaps away a local vibe and charm. Its just not the same if most people in the community did not grow up there. It doesn't feel as homey. Thats why a lot of towns along the Florida coast feel so soulless to me. Its mostly retirees and transplants. You don't get that "down home" feeling in towns like that.
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Old 05-25-2017, 12:28 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,179 posts, read 658,601 times
Reputation: 1741
A transplant.

You have less of the bitterness and baggage because you chose to live there, and can see it more objectively.

The attitudes of many locals here in Philadelphia can be absolutely toxic sometimes (and not to mention, extremely outdated).
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Old 08-01-2017, 08:00 AM
 
Location: DFW
6,800 posts, read 11,772,651 times
Reputation: 5149
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post

I'm happy being a transplant because of the aspect that I choose where to live and I'm choosing to live where I wanna be, but I consider it a luxury to be native of a place that you wanna call home for good. Florida, my homestate, is not that place for me.

To me its like, damn, I just moved here, but these people had the luxury (assuming they love it) of having grown up here and still live here. They have the childhood memories and longtime attachment that I'll never fully have. But, my kids will be able to have it.
My family immigrated to the US and have moved quite a bit. Almost by definition, we'll be transplants for life.

Many of my ancestors were also transplants for life back in their native country (China) and never stayed in the same city. For example, my grandfather, although ethnically Chinese, was born in Japan.

Since then, I've lived in 4 states (and 3 different countries.) The longest I've ever stayed in a single metro area is 10 years (Detroit) and the longest I've stayed in a single state, even discontinuously, is 15 years (California.) I've never stayed in a single city or even state for more than half of my life and I expect this trend to continue for the rest of my life.

Quote:
Well I'm gonna be a transplant to Minnesota, but I'd rather be a native to Minnesota, but I don't have that privilege So it'll be like "I wasn't born here, but I got here as soon as I could!"
To me, I've never really understood the pride of being a lifelong resident of (insert city or state), but then again, I've always seemed to connect better with people who have moved a lot than those who have stayed in the same place their entire lives. Also, it helps to frame your "transplant" status in a better way: instead of presenting yourself as an outsider, present yourself as someone who has lived in many interesting places and people will want to make conversation with you.

Quote:
Anywho, I love places especially small towns, where most people are native and everyone knows each other and there's so much character. Transplants are cool, I mean, I am one, but too many transplants really zaps away a local vibe and charm. Its just not the same if most people in the community did not grow up there. It doesn't feel as homey. Thats why a lot of towns along the Florida coast feel so soulless to me. Its mostly retirees and transplants. You don't get that "down home" feeling in towns like that.
I think many small towns have a ton of character (more so than your typical big box suburb) but big international cities tend to have even more, especially with the prevalence of various ethnic communities (Chinatowns, Japantowns, Little Italys, etc.)

I also think a lot of transplants who have an overly positive or negative attitude towards their former location tends to give other transplants a bad name, especially California transplants from my experience (since I used to live there as well.) It's harder to take you seriously when you're constantly raving about the great weather back home or complaining about the astronomical cost of living, so please try to be more objective when your representing your previous location when you've transplanted to a new place.
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Old 08-01-2017, 12:51 PM
 
75 posts, read 59,322 times
Reputation: 138
I live in Seattle and I am actually from Seattle which makes me pretty rare in Seattle these days with all of the transplants. As much as I like being a native, I think it is cooler to be a transplant because as a transplant you actually chose to live there. As a native, you never chose to be born and raised where you were born and raised. I never chose to be born and raised in Seattle. Seattle just happens to be where my mom gave birth to me and where my parents chose to raise me. I like the idea of moving away from Seattle because whichever city I chose to move to will be a city that I chose and not a city that was given to me. So I think that being a transplant feels more special. However, I do feel that it was special to have lived in Seattle during the 1980's and 1990's before Seattle got ruined.
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