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View Poll Results: Would you rather be considered a native or a transplant?
Native 58 60.42%
Transplant 38 39.58%
Voters: 96. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-02-2017, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,875 posts, read 36,203,761 times
Reputation: 63536

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I've kinda half a transplant here in Louisiana in that I was born here and spent my childhood here but have been away for 20 years. There's been many changes but I prefer to be native for sure. In the South you definitely want to be a native. I've been told I am still a very Southern person despite living in Maryland for many years. I am a Southerner in terms of my culture and religion and worldview. Unlike other parts of the South we actually don't have too many transplants here and the ones that come do tend to assimilate and fit in kinda like West Virginia.

I don't want to be a transplant in a place like North Carolina, Georgia, Nevada, Arizona or Colorado where there is a lot of tension and resentment between natives and transplants. A lot of these issues come from newcomers forcing their harried pace of life, their demanding nature, and their liberal politics on the natives.

Interesting. I'm a native Southerner but I've lived in many different southern states over the years. I don't find that STATES are weird about native vs transplant. What I've found is that typically, the smaller the community, the stranger people are about transplants. This goes for north, south, east and west.

Which is fine with me because I don't want to live in a small, rural community anyway. Win Win.
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,875 posts, read 36,203,761 times
Reputation: 63536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
WHy would you offend the mechanic anyway?

I do prefer the small town living where everyone knows you. I lived for 4 years in West Virginia and became very assimilated into the community despite being a newcomer and a minority. I was able to get a well paying seasonal job (over people who I know are more experienced and qualified), had a speeding ticket canceled, got a free state inspection sticker without actually having my car inspected all because of connections. Being a native or very assimilated allows you be part of this kind of ol' boy network. And I do like it. Family and friends matter, if I start my own business of course I'll try to hire friends and relatives first.

I would have stayed there but now that I need a full time professional job I had to return to Louisiana which I also love. (I hated Maryland which is where I lived way too long). While I grew up in Metairie I live near Baton Rouge now and find the area quite welcoming and easy to meet new friends. But its not good to be a native if you are the kind of person who starts drama. There were some people like that in my town in WV too and they are the ones who couldn't wait to leave the state to get away from it.

At least in West Virginia and Louisiana its not true that people already have their social circles and aren't interested in meeting new people. Some people who grow up in a small town like to get to know new people. Also people can live in the same place their entire life and they lose some of their original friends because their friends moved away for work, are now into drugs and no longer talk etc or people who are recently divorced and have to remake their social circle especially if they had a spouse that was really not into socializing.
To each his own.

And by "offending the mechanic" - I don't mean intentionally - I mean, inadvertently. For instance, the guy tells you your car will be ready by Friday afternoon. It's not. You have to rent a car. Monday it's still not ready, because you're two weeks from everywhere in a small town. You express your frustration. Next thing you know, you've offended not only the mechanic, but his cousin at the bank, and the local Chamber of Commerce President.

Hey, it happens.

And what you describe here:
Quote:
I was able to get a well paying seasonal job (over people who I know are more experienced and qualified), had a speeding ticket canceled, got a free state inspection sticker without actually having my car inspected all because of connections. Being a native or very assimilated allows you be part of this kind of ol' boy network. And I do like it. Family and friends matter, if I start my own business of course I'll try to hire friends and relatives first.
This is exactly what I DON'T like about the good ol' boy systems in place in so many small rural communities. You should have your car inspected - what's so great about not getting it inspected? It takes about 10 minutes and helps not just you but other drivers. And hey, there's a better way to avoid speeding tickets - it's called NOT SPEEDING. And when it comes to hiring and being hired - I much prefer hiring (and being serviced by) the most qualified and experienced folks, so your story of being hired over people who you know are more qualified doesn't impress me.

But thanks for the reminders of why I will always avoid living in small towns filled with natives. That good ol' boy network is probably THE BIGGEST turnoff of all to me.

One more interesting note - I am actually a Metairie native. Metairie is basically a suburb of New Orleans, so it doesn't really have that small town feel to me at all. I also lived in Maryland and loved it, just for the record. Oh, and my husband worked up in WV for many years - in fact, he still works up there occasionally. He works up in that area so much that we actually contemplated moving up there for awhile. Went and scoped out the real estate markets and local towns and quickly ruled it out. So like I said, to each his own - I'm not saying your a dumbass for liking those places, I'm just saying it's interesting to me that the very things you seem to like so much are the very things I dislike. So it's a good thing that here in the US we have so many options.

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 08-02-2017 at 08:06 AM..
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:02 PM
 
482 posts, read 251,510 times
Reputation: 1196
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Do you think it's preferable to be a native or a transplant with respect to the area you are living in?

I mean, if you relocate somewhere, wouldn't you wish that you were considered a native instead of a transplant with respect to that area?

In my opinion, there's something valuable about being a native to a particular area. The intangible feeling of home or something like that.

I just think it feels better to be able to say, "yeah, I'm from here," instead of saying, "i'm not from here; I'm from ______."
Everyone is native to a particular place, so anyone who relocates from their birth home is able to claim they're a native and a transplant depending on where they find themselves sleeping during a given holiday.

As far as which is personally preferable, I've been the transplant enough times for it to feel natural to me. Being the native is foreign to me and somewhat distasteful, since my relocation experiences have become so central to my identity. In a transplant heavy metro like DFW, I can't imagine taking pride in being one of the relatively few people (percentage-wise) who are here by default rather than by choice.

There's certainly nothing wrong with being born in a great city and choosing to not fix something that isn't broken, but on average the transplants I've met in my life are so much more interesting to me than are natives. I believe long-distance relocation in itself is such a life-altering experience that it can compel otherwise ordinary people to become extraordinary.

I enjoy having an outside perspective to contribute to my community. I also enjoy the meshing of my point-of-view with many other outside perspectives to gradually move towards an entirely new and unique culture. I accept and embrace that this new culture I'm helping to create will eventually be rejected by some subsequent generation, which will leave and start the meshing process all over again someplace else.
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,989,000 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
WHy would you offend the mechanic anyway?

I do prefer the small town living where everyone knows you. I lived for 4 years in West Virginia and became very assimilated into the community despite being a newcomer and a minority. I was able to get a well paying seasonal job (over people who I know are more experienced and qualified), had a speeding ticket canceled, got a free state inspection sticker without actually having my car inspected all because of connections. Being a native or very assimilated allows you be part of this kind of ol' boy network. And I do like it. Family and friends matter, if I start my own business of course I'll try to hire friends and relatives first.

I would have stayed there but now that I need a full time professional job I had to return to Louisiana which I also love. (I hated Maryland which is where I lived way too long). While I grew up in Metairie I live near Baton Rouge now and find the area quite welcoming and easy to meet new friends. But its not good to be a native if you are the kind of person who starts drama. There were some people like that in my town in WV too and they are the ones who couldn't wait to leave the state to get away from it.

At least in West Virginia and Louisiana its not true that people already have their social circles and aren't interested in meeting new people. Some people who grow up in a small town like to get to know new people. Also people can live in the same place their entire life and they lose some of their original friends because their friends moved away for work, are now into drugs and no longer talk etc or people who are recently divorced and have to remake their social circle especially if they had a spouse that was really not into socializing.
Being a part of the good ole boy network is good, if you're a good ole boy. I hope your car is actually in good enough shape to drive.
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,989,000 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
To each his own.

And by "offending the mechanic" - I don't mean intentionally - I mean, inadvertently. For instance, the guy tells you your car will be ready by Friday afternoon. It's not. You have to rent a car. Monday it's still not ready, because you're two weeks from everywhere in a small town. You express your frustration. Next thing you know, you've offended not only the mechanic, but his cousin at the bank, and the local Chamber of Commerce President.

Hey, it happens.

And what you describe here:

This is exactly what I DON'T like about the good ol' boy systems in place in so many small rural communities. You should have your car inspected - what's so great about not getting it inspected? It takes about 10 minutes and helps not just you but other drivers. And hey, there's a better way to avoid speeding tickets - it's called NOT SPEEDING. And when it comes to hiring and being hired - I much prefer hiring (and being serviced by) the most qualified and experienced folks, so your story of being hired over people who you know are more qualified doesn't impress me.

But thanks for the reminders of why I will always avoid living in small towns filled with natives. That good ol' boy network is probably THE BIGGEST turnoff of all to me.

One more interesting note - I am actually a Metairie native. Metairie is basically a suburb of New Orleans, so it doesn't really have that small town feel to me at all. I also lived in Maryland and loved it, just for the record. Oh, and my husband worked up in WV for many years - in fact, he still works up there occasionally. He works up in that area so much that we actually contemplated moving up there for awhile. Went and scoped out the real estate markets and local towns and quickly ruled it out. So like I said, to each his own - I'm not saying your a dumbass for liking those places, I'm just saying it's interesting to me that the very things you seem to like so much are the very things I dislike. So it's a good thing that here in the US we have so many options.
KA, we finally agree on something.
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Old 08-02-2017, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,875 posts, read 36,203,761 times
Reputation: 63536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
KA, we finally agree on something.
LOL will wonders never cease?
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Old 08-02-2017, 08:25 PM
 
13,591 posts, read 22,040,652 times
Reputation: 4612
Depends on the area/state/city.
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Old 09-23-2017, 09:17 PM
 
18,889 posts, read 7,350,115 times
Reputation: 8073
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
I take it you've never lived in the South.
I am a Ct native, who lived near Nashville 17 years and felt welcomed wherever I went there.
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Old 09-23-2017, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,433,481 times
Reputation: 13010
To me, it depends on the area and the person.

I'm a native of Corona, CA. While I enjoy many aspects of the culture, and understand all of them, it never felt like the place was right for me.

There are other places I've lived where being a transplant either makes no difference, or is even looked at as a positive of sorts (piques people's interest/etc).

I would NEVER, EVER, EEEEEVVVVVVVEERRRRRR want to be a native of the place I live in now (and have for 10 years). Much of the native community here fits a really lame caricature that I want no part of.
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Old 09-24-2017, 08:57 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,742 posts, read 9,037,388 times
Reputation: 11138
I'd prefer to live where I can make a living and if I am a transplant I'm not surrounded by a bunch of paranoid close minded jerkoffs who think their location is for them and their inbred friends and family only.
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