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Old 07-18-2014, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
I figured people would move out of Chinatown / Koreatown / Japantown after the first generation, which is why Japantowns have basically ceased to exist since the Japanese stopped immigrating two generations ago.
It's not all or nothing so you're kinda right. Plenty of second and third generations move on and assimilate. But there are some who stay. In any case, in my head I was thinking about cities with these neighborhoods, not necessarily strictly the neighborhoods themselves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
Your example sounds pretty extreme and cultish to be honest. Being born and raised in America and having an accent is more common among groups like the Amish and Hasidic who intentionally try to avoid interacting with regular Americans. I suppose if she suffers from extreme social anxiety and only interacts with her Chinese family then I can understand why she would have an accent.
I'm with you on that thinking, but actually your assumption of her is completely wrong. She's as social and active as anyone I have ever met (she's actually kind of a celebrity/star in her field, entirely owed to her personality and networking ability) I think what that example shows is people living in those areas can be completely insulated from others. Anyway as I said before, it's a phenomenon that was highly-discussed and analyzed, so it's a very real thing. In some schools in Miami the kids all speak Spanish.

I pulled up the article I was talking about...it was Wall Street Journal from 2005

The New White Flight - WSJ
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Old 07-19-2014, 04:47 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
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I would say, Honolulu. LA, NYC, SF/San Jose would have to be close.
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Old 09-26-2014, 11:27 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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One way to check would to calculate the % of Asians that speak English at home. Won't be quite the same as "American-born" but maybe closer in number to the % of Asians that Americanized.
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Old 09-26-2014, 11:37 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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For NYC proper, 79.5% of the Asian population is foreign born. 67% speak an Asian language at home, which might be an undercount as Asian Indians might not get counted as speaking an Asian langauge if they speak an Indo-European language. Metro stats are harder to do.
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Old 09-26-2014, 05:39 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Going by state. Almost all of NY state's Asian population is in downstate NY, so looking at the whole state gives an idea of the NY side of the NYC metro. 73% of the state's Asian population is foreign born, 59% speak an Asian language at home. In contrast, 59% of the Hispanic population is foreign born. For California, 70% of Asian were born abroad, so not a huge difference. 68% speak an Asian language at home.

For Hawaii, 38.7% is Asian alone, 57.1% has some Asian ancestry. (Asian and Native Hawaiian is more common than Asian and White). I'd assume almost all part Asians were born in Hawaii and speak English (or Hawaiian pidgin?) 14.1% of the Hawaiian population was born in an Asian country, about a third of the Asian population if counting those with Asian-only ancestry. Interestingly, Puerto Rico is the most single Hispanic ancestry. 21.9% speak an Asian language at home. Unlike the other two states, there are people speaking an Asian language than born in Asia. Which means it's being passed down to the second generation. Other states are opposite: some foreign born speak at home. I assume it's due to the higher % of Asians in general, or more of a cultural disconnect from the rest of the US.

Note California is as Hispanic as Hawaii is in Asian (alone). It has the same pattern: 28% of the population speaks Spanish at home even though only 21% was born in Latin America.
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Old 09-27-2014, 10:05 AM
 
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I'm not going to start crunching numbers for a bunch of random U.S. cities, but I'll at least do the obvious:

2013 percentage born in the United States (Asian alone) -

Oakland - 35%
San Francisco - 33%
Seattle - 33%
Los Angeles - 31%
San Jose - 31%
New York - 28%

If you want to get the data yourself, I suggest you go on American Factfinder, type in "Asian" under topic or table name and look for the dataset that shows PLACE OF BIRTH (ASIAN ALONE) IN THE UNITED STATES. Then you will get numbers that show how many were born in state of residence, in another state of residence, native but born outside the U.S. and foreign born.
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Old 09-27-2014, 09:10 PM
 
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In the mainland US, I'm guessing it's somewhere in the interior West - in a state that received some railroad workers but wasn't a center for post-1965 immigration. Something like Boise or Salt Lake City.
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Old 09-27-2014, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
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East side of St. Paul
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Old 09-27-2014, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
In the mainland US, I'm guessing it's somewhere in the interior West - in a state that received some railroad workers but wasn't a center for post-1965 immigration. Something like Boise or Salt Lake City.
The 19th century Chinese population almost entirely died of old age. It was over 90% male, which was in part due to social factors in China, but after 1872 due to immigration restrictions placed on Chinese women. Most men lived lives of bachelorhood, with perhaps occasional visits to prostitutes (at times over half of the women in Chinese communities were prostitutes, because there was such a high demand). Relatively few outmarried, but this was probably more common overall than finding a Chinese wife - particularly in Arkansas and Louisiana many married into the black community.
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Old 09-27-2014, 09:58 PM
 
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Do we mean any "city" or at the metro level? At what minium size?

It could also be a place where the Japanese American population is significant or a significant proportion of the Asian American population - given that so many are third generation and beyond. The Sansei (3rd generation generally born 1945-1965) out-married at a very high rate.

Could also be somewhere that received Vietnamese boat people in the 70s but hasn't kept pace with more recent Asian immigration and hence there would be a sizable second generation.
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