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Old 07-16-2014, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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There are many college towns such as Charlottesville, VA where virtually every Asian person is not a native English speaker, being either an international student or a foreign scholar.

Many cities have Chinatown/Koreatowns where all the signs are in Chinese or Korean and you can get by never speaking English and eating rice with chopsticks everyday.

These places are obviously not where American born Asian-Americans hang out.

Where in the U.S. (suburbs, cities, neighborhoods) are there a high proportion of American-born Asian Americans, relative to the total Asian-American population?

In the U.S. as a whole, 74% of Asian people weren't born in the U.S. Where is this number the lowest?
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Old 07-16-2014, 09:22 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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...somewhere on the West Coast
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Old 07-16-2014, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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I don't know the percentage but there are a lot of American born Asians in the Seattle area especially in Federal Way, WA. And Asians in general
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Old 07-16-2014, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
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Definitely the big California cities. The Asian communities are well-established and thus into 2nd, 3rd generational American-born now. There are obviously a lot of new Asian immigrants, but also significant amount of Americanized Asians in areas such as the Bay Area, San Gabriel Valley of LA and Orange County, as well as Sacramento.

Yes when you see a random Asian walking around the streets of University Town, Kansas or Indiana- chances are it's an international student.
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Old 07-17-2014, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 677,704 times
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Honolulu?
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Old 07-17-2014, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Duluth, Ga is 22% Asian.
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Old 07-17-2014, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Thanks everyone.

Anyone know of where I can get statistics for such info? Obviously from U.S. Census info but I'm specifically asking about foreign-born vs. native-born Asian percentage.
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Old 07-17-2014, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
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I'm really not sure but I think it's an interesting question.

However, I disagree with part of your premise:
Quote:
Many cities have Chinatown/Koreatowns where all the signs are in Chinese or Korean and you can get by never speaking English and eating rice with chopsticks everyday.

These places are obviously not where American born Asian-Americans hang out.
What you described are areas with lots of later-generation immigrants (born in the US). For Chinese, we call ourselves ABCs. The historic and authentic Chinatowns in this country (e.g. LA, San Francisco, Chicago, NYC) have had Chinese settlers for many many generations so it stands to reason they've given birth to a long line of ABCs. Some of these enclaves have sheltered their young so they speak Chinese fluently...doesnt mean they're not American-born. There was a study about this about 7 years ago, and I remember reading in the NY Times (or similar publication) about the second white flight in California where families were moving away from certain school districts so their kids wouldn't have to compete with Chinese/Asian kids. The article mentioned that some Chinese kids had never set foot in a non-Chinese home. (BTW this was all eye-opening to me as an ABC who grew up in a very diverse culture) Few years later I became good friends with a Taiwanese girl from LA who told me that was her story too. She was born and raised in Torrance, CA (heavily-Chinese suburb of LA) and she had never been inside a non-Chinese person's home til she was working on a school project her senior year of high school and went to one of her white classmate's homes. BTW...for a long time I thought that friend was born in Taiwan because she has a bit of an accent...lol.
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Old 07-18-2014, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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I figured people would move out of Chinatown / Koreatown / Japantown after the first generation, which is why Japantowns have basically ceased to exist since the Japanese stopped immigrating two generations ago.

Your example sounds pretty extreme and cultish to be honest. Being born and raised in America and having an accent is more common among groups like the Amish and Hasidic who intentionally try to avoid interacting with regular Americans. I suppose if she suffers from extreme social anxiety and only interacts with her Chinese family then I can understand why she would have an accent.
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Old 07-18-2014, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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It is almost certainly Honolulu. The city was 54.8% Asian in 2010. I can't find foreign born information for the "city" in specific (since it has no self-government), but Honolulu County as a whole (Oahu) is 19.7% foreign born. Some of the foreign born are undoubtedly non-Asians as well.

The only caveat here is people in Hawaii are very mixed, so a lot of the "Asian" people probably do have some non-Asian ancestry somewhere in their background. Even if not they are fairly likely to be a mix of different Asian groups (Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino mostly) so not any one thing.
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