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Old 08-25-2014, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Because the park is in a neighborhood that was inhabited by workers who came from VA, NC, GA.
What source supports this claim?
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Old 08-25-2014, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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What's interesting about the political angle is that the Northeast has not been uniformly Democratic for very long. Ronald Reagan destroyed Democrats in the Northeast (and just about everywhere for that matter) running on issues that were just as anathema to liberals then as they are today. Reagan carried New England twice (with the exception of RI in 1984) thanks in large part to more conservative Catholic voters. Bill Clinton barely edged out George H.W. Bush in New Jersey in 1992 and probably would have lost the state had it not been for Ross Perot.

Demographic shifts have obviously shaken up things quite a bit. New Jersey's non-Hispanic White population, for example, has declined from around 85% of the population in 1970 to about 57% in 2012. Nonetheless, New Jersey still shows some purplish tendencies every now and again.

Virginia, North Carolina and Georgia are starting to follow their northern neighbors down this course as the non-White population continues to grow. But it seems to me that there has to be a tipping point here; no good thing lasts forever. Greater diversity inures to Democrats' advantage now, but that can become an exploitable weakness later down the road as White suburban resentment of affirmative action and other minority-friendly policies begins to fester. And then you have a lot of disparate interests that make up the Democratic coalition that will be difficult to hold together as time passes (Asians, for example, often feel that affirmative action works against them, and are not as likely to support it as Blacks and Hispanics).
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:17 AM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,525,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muppethammer26 View Post
Are there any Italian neighborhoods in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Delaware? Any Italians living in those four states?
RI, believe it or not, is one of the most Italian states. You can find a list under "demographics" in this link. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_American

Maryland is 5.2% to RI's 18.9%. DE is 9.9% and NJ is 16.8%. MA is 12.9% and PA is 12.2%.

Then it lists the only 6 states with over 10% Italian ancestry: RI, CT, NJ, MA, NY, PA.

Last edited by JerseyGirl415; 08-26-2014 at 07:35 AM..
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I assume those % are metro stats? Ancedontally, I have an Italian-American friend from Richmond. Accent didn't seem southern to my ears.
Yep. Richmond has a small but distinct Italian-American community. Historically, it was always larger than the Italian communities in other southern cities (with the exceptions of New Orleans and Baltimore).

http://www.people.vcu.edu/~mmessner/...anwebsite.html

Richmond was another southern city that experienced some heavy industrialization. You can still see glimpses of its industrial heritage when passing through on I-95.

History of Richmond, Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-26-2014, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Though vowel features make a certain New Orleans accent sound oddly similar to a NYC accent though.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpFDNTo4DNg

[first speaker] Doesn't sound the same, but a few similarities.
Holy crap! These people sound like countryfied New Yorkers.
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Old 08-26-2014, 08:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Holy crap! These people sound like countryfied New Yorkers.
Yeah, that is weird.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Okay, let's talk about the black populations of these cities - which after all form the ethnic majorities - and both Baltimore and Philadelphia are solidly southern sounding cities, just like Chicago, Cleveland, and a whole slew of other otherwise northern cities.
Philadelphia Italians have actually had quite the influence on Philly's Black community (especially in South Philly). The "Black Mafia" began in South Philadelphia and modeled its structure after the Italian mafia already operating in the area. "Skinny" Joey Merlino, who is to this day one of the biggest Philadelphia celebrities (though he lives in Florida now), was a backer of the R.A.M. Squad, a popular hip hop group during my high school days. And of course, Philadelphia hip hop is forever paying homage to its organized crime-ridden past.

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/hi...hia_crime.html

Philadelphia producers love to sample crime dramas.


Franco Micalizzi - Affanno - YouTube


Cassidy - Can I Talk To Ya? - No DJ HQ HD Dirty - YouTube
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:55 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Philadelphia Italians have actually had quite the influence on Philly's Black community (especially in South Philly).
I'm guessing that NYC didn't have the same dynamic, seems like Italians live side by side with blacks in Philadelphia more.
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Old 08-26-2014, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm guessing that NYC didn't have the same dynamic, seems like Italians live side by side with blacks in Philadelphia more.
Definitely had some influence. Not sure how "Yo" wound up in NYC Black vernacular, but most sources attribute it to Italian-Americans. I guess that made it into Black Philly/NYC culture along with track suits.

Quote:
The popularity of the interjection "Yo" is believed to have grown out of Philadelphia's Italian immigrant population. During the mid-1940s, Philadelphia's adjacent Italian and African-American neighborhoods experienced significant growth, resulting in the merging of the two cultures. Tension between the two groups was notably high, which was fueled by a high crime rate, but certain cultural oddities passed between the two groups. The most influential of these transferences is the word "yo,", a term that possibly stems from the Italian first person singular "io."

In the Neapolitan dialect "Guaglione" (pronounced guahl-YO-nay) signified a young man. The chiefly unlettered immigrants in cities such as Philadelphia and New York shortened that to guahl-YO, which they pronounced whal-YO. This was possibly further shortened to yo.
Yo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There are other products of Italian-American culture that have become Philly mainstream culture (Italian ice and cheesesteaks being two prime examples).
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Old 08-26-2014, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Historically speaking, Italians were actually the second-most likely group of "ethnic whites" to have relatively harmonious relationships with Blacks in northern cities, with only Greeks being more "integrated" overall. Possibly because they were considered among the most "suspect whites" in America up until relatively recently. It's typically been the Irish who have got along terribly with blacks in Northern cities.
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