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Old 08-08-2014, 10:00 AM
 
Location: USA
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^ I'm not going to argue with you but nj is a lot different from nyc to a native New Yorker, even if a lot of Italians live in nj. They're not the same as ny Italians. It's just more laid back compared to ny and long island. As a matter of fact, staten island is a lot different than the other 4 boroughs even. It's more like new jersey than ny. I don't know how else to explain what I'm saying, except it's just not the same type of atmosphere as ny. Ny has more in common with New England to me but people not from ny lump it in with nj and pa I guess.

Sorry if you're offended tho. I really didn't mean to hurt anyone's feelings that
I don't know plus I have nothing against you or where you are from anyway.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:11 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The four big, non-Hispanic White "ethnic" groups (Italian, Irish, Polish and Jewish) make up 21.75% of the Baltimore MSA (and 36% of Whites). In DC, they make up 15.65% of the MSA (31% of Whites). In Atlanta, they make up 12.38% of the MSA (25% of Whites). In Richmond, they make up 12.15% of the MSA (20% of Whites). In Philadelphia, they make up 32.68% of the MSA (51% of Whites). In New York, they make up 30.13% of the MSA (61% of Whites).
The Polish and Jewish numbers may overlap. At least on Long Island and probably other NYC suburbs, people I met who said their grandparents came from Poland were usually Jewish. The non-Jewish Polish population is much smaller than the Jewish population from Poland. In NYC proper there is a more recent population of non-Jewish Poles, but I don't think there's many in the coastal Northeast outside of NYC (maybe missing something).

Random fact: In 1930, only the Soviet Union and Poland had a larger Jewish population than just New York City alone. Of larger cities, only Warsaw (a few smaller eastern European cities were higher) had a higher Jewish % than NYC. Baltimore had a bit lower Jewish % than Boston, but was still higher than just about any other major city outside the Northeast, it was more similar to the Northeast by Jewish population than outside the Northeast.

http://www.ajcarchives.org/ajc_data/...statistics.pdf
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:13 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
^ I'm not going to argue with you but nj is a lot different from nyc to a native New Yorker, even if a lot of Italians live in nj. They're not the same as ny Italians. It's just more laid back compared to ny and long island. As a matter of fact, staten island is a lot different than the other 4 boroughs even. It's more like new jersey than ny. I don't know how else to explain what I'm saying, except it's just not the same type of atmosphere as ny. Ny has more in common with New England to me but people not from ny lump it in with nj and pa I guess.
Most Italian-Americans have left the four boroughs, the bulk of NYC metro Italians are in Long Island, Staten Island and New Jersey. Still many left of course, but the Italian-American NYC image is rather outdated.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:15 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by rranger View Post
Well put, and I might add that with each passing day Hartford gets smaller and smaller and smaller (like all of the CT "ciites"). Both Providence and Hartford have huge Hispanic populations relative to their size (as does Springfield, though it hasn't been mentioned, Worcester less so).
Hartford is growing not shrinking.

Hartford (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

It may have lots nearly all its non-hispanic white residents, but lots of minorities moved in.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:17 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I'd also propose removing Northern Brooklyn from the Northeast. That clearly belongs to the Midwest now.
I know you're (mostly) joking, but even if the NYC forum thinks that all the transplants in northern Brooklyn come from the Midwest, I suspect the majority or near majority actually are from the Northeast. And a not minor number are actually from the NYC suburbs.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The Polish and Jewish numbers may overlap. At least on Long Island and probably other NYC suburbs, people I met who said their grandparents came from Poland were usually Jewish. The non-Jewish Polish population is much smaller than the Jewish population from Poland. In NYC proper there is a more recent population of non-Jewish Poles, but I don't think there's many in the coastal Northeast outside of NYC (maybe missing something).
I would say that there's signficantly more overlap between Jewish and Russian/Ukrainian in New York than there is between Jewish and Polish. So much Ashkenazi Jewish immigration occurred prior to WWII that there's not so much of a "Polish" identity anymore (among Jews). A lot of the Jews from Ukraine, however, were born there and immigrated here in the late 80s/early 90s. I have a lot of friends who fall into that category.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:24 AM
Status: "Retired" (set 18 days ago)
 
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New Jersey borders Pennsylvania and Delaware and both states are similar to New Jersey just like New York is.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:26 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I would say that there's signficantly more overlap between Jewish and Russian/Ukranian in New York than there is between Jewish and Polish. So much Ashkenazi Jewish immigration occurred prior to WWII that there's not so much of a "Polish" identity anymore (among Jews). A lot of the Jews from Ukraine, however, were born there and immigrated here in the late 80s/early 90s. I have a lot of friends who fall into that category.
True, but on an ancestry survey what would those Jews put? There's no Jewish checkbox, so they might put wherever their grandparents came from. Jewish Ukranians (and Russians) probably came at about the same time period as non-Jewish Polish immigrants. I've met a number of them in college. Most were from NYC, though a few have moved to New Jersey.

*Actually Western Massachusetts got a large number of Polish immigrants in the early 20th century. Ditto with some of upstate NY. Most of the farms seem to owned by people with Polish last names here. But the big cities in the coastal Northeast don't seem have gotten much non-Jewish polish immigration in the early 20th century.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:40 AM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,532,433 times
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Most Italian-Americans have left the four boroughs, the bulk of NYC metro Italians are in Long Island, Staten Island and New Jersey. Still many left of course, but the Italian-American NYC image is rather outdated.


you're right but I'm not Italian tho to be that specific about them.


at least no one is arguing about maryland anymore lol. there is
a different breed of similar ethnic european-americans there too.
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Old 08-08-2014, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,371 posts, read 26,406,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
True, but on an ancestry survey what would those Jews put? There's no Jewish checkbox, so they might put wherever their grandparents came from. Jewish Ukranians (and Russians) probably came at about the same time period as non-Jewish Polish immigrants. I've met a number of them in college. Most were from NYC, though a few have moved to New Jersey.
Good question. But according to Wiki, only 12% of Americans claiming Polish ancestry on the Census identify as Jews. 73% identify as Roman Catholic. This source provides a bit more explanation on the matter.

Quote:
The great majority of Polish Americans is and always has been Roman Catholic at least by baptism. Although pre-World War II Poland was a multi-ethnic and multiconfessional country, the process of immigration galvanized and re-created ethnic identities in the New World context. For example, Polish Jews, who also emigrated in large numbers during the same time period as their Catholic neighbors, largely identified as Jewish American or Russian Jewish in America. Their historical trajectory in the United States is quite different.
Project MUSE - A Social History of Polish-American Catholicism

I also don't believe "Polish" immigration overlapped much with Ukrainian immigration. There were already large Polish communities in the US--including NYC--during the early part of the 20th Century. Most Ukrainians arrived here after the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

If you listen to Jerry Blavat talk about growing up in South Philadelphia in the 50s, he makes a very clear distinction between Poles and Jews.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1Hvw9dxePQ
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