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Old 08-14-2014, 04:35 PM
Status: "Retired" (set 27 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Delaware is a bit harder to classify. It was considered a middle colony but it's part of the South, officially.
But the middle of Philadelphia is only 23.5 miles from the PA/DE border. So we should not split metropolitan areas into 2 regions like Cincinnati, Louisville and Washington. In this case, I will call Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware northeastern states and Philadelphia a northeastern-only metro area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I remember driving to Springfield in college to visit some girls at Mount Holyoke. We had no idea Springfield was that real. Very grimey. Not exactly the image most people have in their head of Massachusetts.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3XsG0BzXjY
Looks like a war zone to me.
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Old 08-14-2014, 04:38 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muppethammer26 View Post
But the middle of Philadelphia is only 23.5 miles from the PA/DE border. So we should not split metropolitan areas into 2 regions like Cincinnati, Louisville and Washington. In this case, I will call Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware northeastern states and Philadelphia a northeastern-only metro area.
MD has county in the Philly MSA but not sure the census is best to generate regions

that said going to Wilmington does not feel like you have entered a new region per se
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Old 08-14-2014, 04:44 PM
Status: "Retired" (set 27 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
MD has county in the Philly MSA but not sure the census is best to generate regions

that said going to Wilmington does not feel like you have entered a new region per se
If Delaware is included in a different region than Pennsylvania and New Jersey, then it would look like Philadelphia is bordering another region on the US map with cities. Not a good sign.
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Old 08-14-2014, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post

I still can understand where people grew up when they name their parrish. not the town name for example its different and unless you have lived the differences i think is hard to explain
Exactly. I think the issue here is that you're referencing more nuanced attributes about attitudes and experiences that seem very endemic to the Northeast. DC, on its surface, shares a lot of characteristics, and of course economic ties, to points north, but there's so much more to the culture aspects than median income, white collar jobs and public transit.

There's a particularly parochial and very neurotic tendencies among the "historic" Northeast culture that I just don't get from Washingtonians. People here just tend to have a much more tame and generic personality, no doubt due to being so transplant based.
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Old 08-14-2014, 05:29 PM
 
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One area San Francisco has Washington and Baltimore beat in "northeastern-ness" - presence of Irish and Italians. It really stood out among western cities for its ethnic composition and in 1930 a much higher percentage were of Irish or Italian "stock" than either Baltimore or Washington. However they seem to have completely melted there and don't seem visible at all today.
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Old 08-14-2014, 06:54 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
One area San Francisco has Washington and Baltimore beat in "northeastern-ness" - presence of Irish and Italians. It really stood out among western cities for its ethnic composition and in 1930 a much higher percentage were of Irish or Italian "stock" than either Baltimore or Washington. However they seem to have completely melted there and don't seem visible at all today.
San Francisco got immigrants like most other northern cities, and it was larger than most western cities (immigrants to the smaller western cities were probably more likely German like the rest of the Midwest / West). The San Francisco area got more transplants (like other western metros) than eastern metros postwar so it lost its earlier demographics.

https://www.census.gov/population/ww...029/tab19.html

In 1930:

Baltimore was 9% foreign born
Washington was 6%
Los Angeles was 20% (!) where? Mexicans? Eastern European Jews?
San Francisco was 27%
Seattle was 21%

The southern cities stand out for having a low foreign born % as well as a few non-Great Lakes Midwestern cities (Columbus, Indianapolis, St. Louis). Marin County is 14%, 9% Italian; San Mateo 8% Irish, 9% German, 7% Italian; San Francisco 8% Irish, 8% German, 5% Italian. Italian and Irish look a bit more common relative to German compared to much of the country outside the Northeast.
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
In 1930:

Baltimore was 9% foreign born
Washington was 6%
Los Angeles was 20% (!) where? Mexicans? Eastern European Jews?
San Francisco was 27%
Seattle was 21%
Canada and Great Britain also were pretty sizable in Los Angeles and Seattle.

In L.A. there were 83,000 of British "stock" (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) of whom 32,000 were foreign born. 60,000 "Canadians" and 30,000 foreign born. The British and Canadians made up a quarter of the foreign born population. But they are of course the ultimate "invisible" immigrants.

Last edited by King of Kensington; 08-14-2014 at 07:25 PM..
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:59 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,750,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Marin County is 14%, 9% Italian; San Mateo 8% Irish, 9% German, 7% Italian; San Francisco 8% Irish, 8% German, 5% Italian. Italian and Irish look a bit more common relative to German compared to much of the country outside the Northeast.
So in other words, Italian American enclaves didn't emerge in the suburbs in San Francisco. Here's an interesting piece comparing Italian culture in NY/NJ vs. the Bay Area. This writer attributes the stronger presence in the former to sheer numbers and post-war immigration that mostly went to the New York area and reinvigorated Italian ethnic communities:

Raccogli e passa | i-ITALY
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Old 08-14-2014, 09:50 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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I think Baltimore's Irish and Italian populations are understated as they are more assimilated than points north, but they are definitely there. All of my white coworkers are Irish or Italian; there are a couple of people of German descent. I also have a few mixed cousin who are either mixed with Irish or Italian. Half of the black people are Caribbean (Mostly Jamaican, a few from St. Thomas, Trinidad, and one from Montserrat). Also, just outside of the city, in Pikesville, 19% of the population is Russian, the highest percentage in the country. Fells Point, Canton, and Dundalk were Irish enclaves, today, however those places are mostly yuppie except for Dundalk which has a growing Puerto Rican population. With that say, I'm not saying Baltimore isn't the south. I have also noticed that the Puerto Ricans in south central PA are mostly from the Bronx. Also, in south central PA, you'll see quite a few pick-up trucks with confederate flags hanging from them. Again, still not saying that Baltimore isn't southern.

Last edited by KodeBlue; 08-14-2014 at 10:06 PM..
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Old 08-15-2014, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
One area San Francisco has Washington and Baltimore beat in "northeastern-ness" - presence of Irish and Italians. It really stood out among western cities for its ethnic composition and in 1930 a much higher percentage were of Irish or Italian "stock" than either Baltimore or Washington. However they seem to have completely melted there and don't seem visible at all today.
It's the same thing with West Indians on the West Coast. There simply weren't enough of them out there to have an enduring collective consciousness. I've met my fair share of West Indians from the West Coast and they usually say "My parents are from Jamaica" as opposed to "I'm Jamaican." They've essentially been "blackwashed."

In New York, you meet people whose grandparents were from Jamaica and they still refer to themselves as "Jamaican."

San Francisco has a "Caribbean" Carnival. But it's small and it's usually mixed in with other Latin American cultures (i.e., Nicaraguan, Brazilian, etc.). New York is obviously a different story. With Labor Day approaching, all of the Hip Hop stations are stepping up their soca and reggae mixes (which they play quite a bit anyway). Hot 97, I think, will be all soca, calypso and dancehall all day long the Sunday before Labor Day.

I guess that identity lasts longer when you have a much larger population. In New York, you can even buy Yankees hats and jerseys with the colors of the Jamaican flag.

http://asset1.surfcdn.com/new-era-ca...6iI6lcj&V=UsbQ

http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopo...ian-parade.jpg

http://cn8.wnet.org/wp-content/uploa...ternparade.jpg

http://thegrio.files.wordpress.com/2...5042.jpg?w=512

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/...NDORSE.480.jpg
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