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Old 08-15-2014, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
Reputation: 11734

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Some cool pics of the Puerto Rican Day parade.

http://images.latinpost.com/data/ima...enue.jpg?w=600

http://nycerg.commons.gc.cuny.edu/fi...ican-day-2.jpg

http://www4.pictures.gi.zimbio.com/2...3fG5oJqNxl.jpg

http://bossip.files.wordpress.com/20...pg?w=505&h=350
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
So in other words, Italian American enclaves didn't emerge in the suburbs in San Francisco. Here's an interesting piece comparing Italian culture in NY/NJ vs. the Bay Area. This writer attributes the stronger presence in the former to sheer numbers and post-war immigration that mostly went to the New York area and reinvigorated Italian ethnic communities:

Raccogli e passa | i-ITALY
Interesting post. I didn't realize there was so much Italian immigration after WWII. I always assumed Italian immigration ended around the Depression era. Here are the numbers by Census.

1900: 484,000
1930: 1,790,000
1960: 1,257,000
1970: 1,009,000
1980: 832,000
1990: 581,000

History of immigration to the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-15-2014, 09:10 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,318 posts, read 19,591,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
So is San Francisco northeastern?
The "superstar" metro areas of the U.S. today in terms of high-paying jobs, high educational levels and overall affluence among the populace are New York, Washington DC, San Francisco and Boston. These 4 have the largest number of contiguous zip codes that are in the top 5% of wealth and educational level. (Chicago and Los Angeles also get honorable mention but they are not quite in the same category as these 4.)

That is probably the most important similarity that San Francisco has with these east coast cities. But otherwise, the topography, climate, environment, vibe, residential architecture and many other characteristics of San Francisco are pretty different from the east coast.
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Old 08-15-2014, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
I have also noticed that the Puerto Ricans in south central PA are mostly from the Bronx.
Do you have any data to support this? There are certainly many moving from NY to PA, but I would not say it's most. The Lehigh Valley has one of the highest island-born Borciuan populations in the United States. See Page 7 of this Pew study.

Appendix B: Maps of the U.S. Mainland and Puerto Rico | Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project

You've got three PA counties where 50,000 or more Puerto Ricans were born on the island. Is it possible that some of those island-born Boricuans came via NYC? Sure. But Pennsylvania also receives the highest percentage of Puerto Ricans moving from the island of any other northeastern state. Pennsylvania receives 10% of all Puerto Ricans moving from the island, Massachusetts and New York both receive 9% and Connecticut receives 7%. It's the second highest destination after Florida. A decade ago, it was the fourth most popular destination in the U.S. after Florida, New York and Massachusetts.
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Old 08-15-2014, 09:27 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,048,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Interesting post. I didn't realize there was so much Italian immigration after WWII. I always assumed Italian immigration ended around the Depression era. Here are the numbers by Census.

1900: 484,000
1930: 1,790,000
1960: 1,257,000
1970: 1,009,000
1980: 832,000
1990: 581,000

History of immigration to the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Bensonhurst, and some other nearby parts of southern Brooklyn got a lot of postwar Italian immigration. Can't remember the link, but I read somewhere you could hear the older generation speaking Italian well into the 1980s.

I remember a local pizza place / Italian take-out (mid 90s, Long Island) had an owner that seemed obviously Italian culturally. His son took over after he retired and the quality declined. Owner was probably born in the 1920s, so likely either first generation or second generation but grew up in an Italian speaking household.
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Old 08-15-2014, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
The "superstar" metro areas of the U.S. today in terms of high-paying jobs, high educational levels and overall affluence among the populace are New York, Washington DC, San Francisco and Boston.
So what does DC have in common with the non "superstar" northeastern cities?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxVEhFnGOg0


As Poorest U.S. City, Reading Also Struggling With High Dropout Rate - YouTube
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Old 08-15-2014, 09:54 AM
 
Location: The City
22,341 posts, read 32,203,483 times
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while not highly scientific the link below maps some of the sports affiliation by area

Sort of hits on some of things being discussed here in this thread. The Oriole/Phillies line is sort of interesting in that is more aligns to the Susquehanna and Chesapeake than state borders (with DE being strongly aligned to the Phillies). Maybe a better representation of none state affiliation cities.

Morgan-Ripken Line
"The South may have lost the Civil War, but the Orioles have done a better job of pushing north above the Mason-Dixon line than the Phillies have done expanding beyond their home state. Notably, the Orioles have won over Gettysburg, Pa. We’ve named the Orioles-Phillies border for two of the protagonists in the 1983 World Series, which the Orioles won in five games."

Scroll down through for more detailed closer in maps

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...-baseball.html

Also sort of interesting and hitting on the Trenton/Mercer alignment it skews Phillies and actually nearly mimics the area BCD had in a link on continuous high income/education zips. Which is it more aligns to the Phillies in this sense

Sub/Hoagie Line
"A common mistake in data analysis is to confuse correlation with causation; just because things are related doesn’t mean one caused the other. At the same time, last year's New York Times analysis of American dialects allows us to notice a striking pattern: Which N.L. East team you root for may be revealed by whether you call long sandwiches subs or hoagies. We don't know which causes which, but we do know they go together.* (Because of a mapping error, an earlier version of this map incorrectly characterized Trenton residents as Mets fans who eat hoagies. They appear to be Phillies fans or Yankees fans who eat hoagies.)"

those poor Mets fans...
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Old 08-15-2014, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,286,355 times
Reputation: 11734
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Interesting post. I didn't realize there was so much Italian immigration after WWII. I always assumed Italian immigration ended around the Depression era. Here are the numbers by Census.

1900: 484,000
1930: 1,790,000
1960: 1,257,000
1970: 1,009,000
1980: 832,000
1990: 581,000

History of immigration to the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wiki's numbers can't be right. They conflict with two other sources I've found (one from the Department of Commerce).

Commerce puts the numbers at...

1900-1910: 2,146,012
1911-1920: 1,109,524
1921-1930: 455,315
1931-1940: 67,988
1945-1950: 56,939
1951-1960: 185,493
1961-1969: 186,744

https://www.mtholyoke.edu/~molna22a/...anhistory.html

A different sources puts it at...

1901-1910: 2,045,877
1911-1920: 1,109,524
1921-1930: 455,315
1931-1940: 68,028
1941-1950: 57,661
1951-1960: 185,491
1961-1970: 214,111
1971-1980: 129,368
1981-1990: 67,254
1991-2000: 62,722

http://www.catholicsocialscientists....%20article.pdf
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Old 08-15-2014, 10:31 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,757,182 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Interesting post. I didn't realize there was so much Italian immigration after WWII. I always assumed Italian immigration ended around the Depression era. Here are the numbers by Census.

1900: 484,000
1930: 1,790,000
1960: 1,257,000
1970: 1,009,000
1980: 832,000
1990: 581,000

History of immigration to the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
That's the population for those born in Italy. It peaked in 1930 but there was something like 600,000 Italian immigrants to the US post-war.

And that postwar immigration was even more skewed toward the New York area, replenishing Italian culture in the area. Italian neighborhoods in the outer boroughs were definitely significantly impacted by it. I read that something like 40% of Italian Americans in Bensonhurst speak Italian at home. Certainly that wouldn't be the case if immigration had completely dried up in 1930.
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Old 08-15-2014, 10:52 AM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,757,182 times
Reputation: 931
Places with the highest % born in Italy - I think these are 2000 census figures so the numbers would have decreased since then. The list is dominated by NY/NJ:

http://www.city-data.com/top2/h54.html
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