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Old 07-23-2014, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,263,727 times
Reputation: 11726

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
Not IMO. None of my friends and family in DC, Baltimore and the Eastern Shore of MD are "fixin' to" do anything (much less "set a spell"), nor do they fly confederate flags, they definitely enjoy their scrapple and potatoes and they definitely do not harp on religion.
I think that most of that description applies to Southeastern VA. I think his point was ultimately that there's a slight cultural and demographic transition that occurs once you get south of Baltimore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
Extend the neutral zone across from Richmond to Virginia's Eastern Shore and onto Hampton Roads and it gets closer to the truth, though still a bit broadly stereotyped.
I wouldn't put Richmond or the Eastern Shore of VA in a neutral zone at all. You still have many Southern Baptists in Richmond and SEVA...many, many, many more Southern Baptists than White Catholics or Jews. The DC-Baltimore region is really where northern and southern culture collide. I would call that the neutral area, but not Richmond or Hampton Roads.
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:40 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,138 posts, read 9,915,669 times
Reputation: 6424
One thing that stands out about MARYLAND (and possibly Delaware?) is that she still has strong county governments, probably because of her Southern roots.

This is from the Wikipedia site: Government of Maryland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

At the local level, Maryland is notable among U.S. states for having a relatively small number of local governments. Maryland is also unique among Northeastern states in that it has fairly strong county governments. In most Northeastern states, counties are administrative divisions with little (and in the case of New England, almost nonexistent) authority, and most local government is at the town or city level. This is not true for Maryland's 23 counties, some of which have substantial authority. There are three forms of county government available to the state's counties.[2] Note that the independent city of Baltimore is typically considered to be on par with the counties; it is reckoned as a county-equivalent for census purposes. Including Baltimore, there are 157 incorporated cities in Maryland.

The question is how does this make Maryland look or feel different from the other parts of Northeast (or the Upper Midwest)? In other words how does county planning look versus the more local planning we have here, say for example in New York and New Jersey?
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,263,727 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
The question is how does this make Maryland look or feel different from the other parts of Northeast (or the Upper Midwest)? In other words how does county planning look versus the more local planning we have here, say for example in New York and New Jersey?
Don't think it makes much of a difference at all.

The biggest differences I see are in the demographics. When I lived in DC, nearly all of our admins were Black women from P.G. County with last names like Williams, Jenkins, Washington, etc. In New York, all of our admins come from New Jersey and Staten Island with names like DiCarmine, Ricci, Miceli, etc. Also much more Jewish, obviously.
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Old 07-23-2014, 02:27 PM
 
774 posts, read 1,697,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
They're welcome to that, of course. I'm in TX right now, people here are certainly very nice but I admit I feel somewhat uncomfortable here, though I like the area.

I'll stick to the north, you know, though - the uncontested north. Oh wait, I'm sorry, I may be insulting the potential people out there who believe that NJ is a southern state, let me rephrase. MY OPINION of what the north is. Because of course, there is no true definition for anything as anyone can believe what they want. Isn't that right?
Do you now live in Texas or are you just visiting? From your posts, I can tell you are very pro-NJ and that is great to love your home state. I don't know that there is a solid definition for the South as the Mason-Dixon line was meant to settle a boundary dispute between MD and PA, and later on, was extended along the MD-DE border. For what reason it was extended along the MD-DE line, I am not aware, but using the Mason-Dixon Line as the defining point also means that DE is a Northern state and MD is a Southern one. Me personally, I am not too concerned about what is and what isn't Southern, but one could look at the lifestyle. Using Maryland as an example, whether is is considered Southern, Northeastern, or Mid-Atlantic, one canot deny that elements of all three exist. That is why in past threads, I have said that a person living in an area in which it is not always clear whether or not it is Southern, but has strong southern influences, the person can still rightly be considered a Southerner. Likewise with Northeasterner or Mid-Atlantic designations. I do consider MD, DE, and DC to be part of the present day Northeast in terms of geography if we are using the four region model.
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Old 07-23-2014, 03:29 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,522,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kemba View Post
Do you now live in Texas or are you just visiting? From your posts, I can tell you are very pro-NJ and that is great to love your home state. I don't know that there is a solid definition for the South as the Mason-Dixon line was meant to settle a boundary dispute between MD and PA, and later on, was extended along the MD-DE border. For what reason it was extended along the MD-DE line, I am not aware, but using the Mason-Dixon Line as the defining point also means that DE is a Northern state and MD is a Southern one. Me personally, I am not too concerned about what is and what isn't Southern, but one could look at the lifestyle. Using Maryland as an example, whether is is considered Southern, Northeastern, or Mid-Atlantic, one canot deny that elements of all three exist. That is why in past threads, I have said that a person living in an area in which it is not always clear whether or not it is Southern, but has strong southern influences, the person can still rightly be considered a Southerner. Likewise with Northeasterner or Mid-Atlantic designations. I do consider MD, DE, and DC to be part of the present day Northeast in terms of geography if we are using the four region model.
No, I'm visiting. I like it here though.

I am pro-NJ, mostly because so many are anti-NJ. I like to educate people on what my state is really like if possible.

If using a 4 region model, I'd also agree. Otherwise, I'd say DE, DC, and MD are mid-Atlantic.
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Old 07-23-2014, 03:36 PM
 
620 posts, read 688,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
No, I'm visiting. I like it here though.

I am pro-NJ, mostly because so many are anti-NJ. I like to educate people on what my state is really like if possible.

If using a 4 region model, I'd also agree. Otherwise, I'd say DE, DC, and MD are mid-Atlantic.
If the East Coast was divided into North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic, then this is how it would look like:

North Atlantic (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Northern New York and the eastern 2/3 of Connecticut.

Mid Atlantic (western 1/3 of Connecticut, Southern New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Eastern Ohio, West Virginia and Virginia)

South Atlantic (North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida (excluding the western panhandle), Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands)

To create the Northeast, combine the North Atlantic states and the Mid Atlantic states into one. Even though the southern part of Virginia could go into the Northeast or the Southeast.
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Old 07-23-2014, 03:39 PM
 
3,723 posts, read 3,883,415 times
Reputation: 2779
Massachusetts
Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
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Old 07-23-2014, 03:54 PM
 
620 posts, read 688,068 times
Reputation: 244
Why couldn't the East Coast states get together, unlike the West Coast states? It would be nice if the Northeast and the Southeast get together like the West Coast. People in the East Coast still like to talk about the differences between the Northeast and the Southeast. I never heard anyone talking about the differences between the Northwest and the Southwest in the West Coast.
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Old 07-23-2014, 04:09 PM
 
2,331 posts, read 3,808,383 times
Reputation: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Do cities like Baltimore, MD and Wilmington, DE feel like southern cites to you? If you ask me, places like Newark, NJ kind of feels like a smaller version of Baltimore.
The Maryland Suburbs of Baltimore and DC feels like the Atlanta and Charlotte area....
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Old 07-23-2014, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,474,947 times
Reputation: 5401
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppethammer26 View Post
Why couldn't the East Coast states get together, unlike the West Coast states? It would be nice if the Northeast and the Southeast get together like the West Coast. People in the East Coast still like to talk about the differences between the Northeast and the Southeast. I never heard anyone talking about the differences between the Northwest and the Southwest in the West Coast.
How are you defining the Southwest?
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