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Old 08-19-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,937,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
However there is this that makes Delaware somewhat unique:

Most functions which are handled on a county-by-county basis in other states—such as court and law enforcement—have been centralized in Delaware, leading to a significant concentration of power in the Delaware state government. .

I get the impression that the Delaware State government bypasses both the counties and the local governments to run the local affairs directly, at least in some matters. Because of the State's small size this actually makes a lot of sense and probably helps save on taxes.
This really isn't that unique...several states have taken on local government functions in one way or another. Hawaii, for example, has its entire public school system run by the state. And around half of Alaska is termed the "unorganized borough" with all services provided directly from the state. That said, it is somewhat unusual.
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Old 08-19-2014, 04:09 PM
Status: "Phillies baseball is MLB dysentery." (set 8 hours ago)
 
1,236 posts, read 582,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
However regional lines do move from time to time. There was a time when Florida was not considered the South because she belonged to another country (Spain). And the Great Lakes States were not considered to be the Midwest, they were considered to be the Northwest.

I understand the history of Maryland but times change and I personally feel that Maryland fits in better with the Northeast now. She has connections to both the North and the South. But I think she has more in common today with Pennsylvania or Connecticut then she does with Alabama or Georgia.
I agree that MD doesn't share much with GA or AL but do you not see any commonalities that MD has with VA or parts of eastern NC either? Anyway, I people from the North & South are into MD & DC and would like to claim it as being in their region. LOL.
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Old 08-19-2014, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,464 posts, read 7,528,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Wolf39us, if you believe that regional lines don't move then you can't put Pennsylvania and New Jersey in the northeast.

That's right, Pennsylvania was once considered not northern, but a border area between north and south. I suggest you take a look at William Randall and Philipp Klein's histories of Pennsylvania. Their books are the standard for undegraduate and graduate students studying the subject. For less cost you can view on Youtube Yale university's Professor Joanne Freeman touch upon the subject during one of her lectures. New Jersey held onto this reputation for an even longer time, but I digress. In my opinion it would be absurd to argue that these places are still grey areas.
I think that's a bit of a misinterpretation. When the states were still in their formative stages (i.e., colonial times), modern-day understanding of North-South really didn't exist. Only over decades of settlements, industrialization and cultural fermentation did that emerge.

To this end, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware were all considered the "middle colonies," as a distinctive region between the colonial-era South and New England, but that has a different contextual meaning from today's understanding of the Northeast.

Middle Colonies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://www.ushistory.org/us/4.asp
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Old 08-19-2014, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,264,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
I think that's a bit of a misinterpretation. When the states were still in their formative stages (i.e., colonial times), modern-day understanding of North-South really didn't exist. Only over decades of settlements, industrialization and cultural fermentation did that emerge.

To this end, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware were all considered the "middle colonies," as a distinctive region between the colonial-era South and New England, but that has a different contextual meaning from today's understanding of the Northeast.

Middle Colonies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Middle Colonies [ushistory.org]
I am not speaking of the 'middle colonies' but of the US after independence. In addition to the books I mentioned, the topic is regularly brought up in the Pennsylvania Journal of Middle Atlantic Studies, a peer reviewed scholarly journal available on JSTOR. It was not uncommon to hear Philadelphia referred to as the 'northernmost southern city' as late as the Civil War. Her reputation as a border area rapidly faded during the era of the Missouri Compromise and Maryland and Delaware became widely considered the new border area. The eighth chapter of the book Philadelphia: A 300 Year History titled 'The Border City in the Civil War' briefly discusses this shift, as does Donehoo and Patterson's Pennsylvania: A History:

"The transition had taken scarcely three decades. Their hearts and minds no longer straddled the cultural boundaries of North and South. The gaze of Philadelphians turned North, and North it would remain".

Donehoo, George Patterson. Pennsylvania, a History. New York: Lewis Historical Pub., 1926. 243.

Last edited by hobbesdj; 08-19-2014 at 06:46 PM..
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Old 08-19-2014, 07:56 PM
 
620 posts, read 687,908 times
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To anyone who are calling MD and DE southern states:

If you want to make Maryland and Delaware southern states, here's what you should do:

1. Move the Mason-Dixon Line slightly north (up until about the same latitude as the northernmost point in Delaware), so Maryland would annex a small sliver of Pennsylvania south of the new Mason-Dixon Line.
2. Extend the new Mason-Dixon Line east and have Delaware annex every part of New Jersey south of the new Mason-Dixon Line.
3. Have West Virginia give away the northern panhandle to Ohio.
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,504,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muppethammer26 View Post
To anyone who are calling MD and DE southern states:

If you want to make Maryland and Delaware southern states, here's what you should do:

1. Move the Mason-Dixon Line slightly north (up until about the same latitude as the northernmost point in Delaware), so Maryland would annex a small sliver of Pennsylvania south of the new Mason-Dixon Line.
2. Extend the new Mason-Dixon Line east and have Delaware annex every part of New Jersey south of the new Mason-Dixon Line.
3. Have West Virginia give away the northern panhandle to Ohio.
If you think the Mason Dixon is a perfectly straight line, then you have missed that history class or weren't paying attention. Please go back and re-read your history.

Option 2: LOOK at the map.

Thanks.
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:06 PM
 
2,253 posts, read 2,753,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muppethammer26 View Post
If you want to make Maryland and Delaware southern states
They already *are* Southern states.
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:09 PM
 
620 posts, read 687,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
If you think the Mason Dixon is a perfectly straight line, then you have missed that history class or weren't paying attention. Please go back and re-read your history.

Option 2: LOOK at the map.

Thanks.
I always called Maryland and Delaware northern states. I was just telling this to southern expansionists.
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:10 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,176,306 times
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I petition to have PA and NJ as the start of the new South and to hold the line

Waffle houses for everyone
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:12 PM
 
620 posts, read 687,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I petition to have PA and NJ as the start of the new South and to hold the line

Waffle houses for everyone
But first we need to annex Canada and have some people move there and create more states. Have Waffle House expand to the whole country including the newly annexed Canada.
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