U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Most "American" region?
South 22 22.68%
Midwest 75 77.32%
Voters: 97. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-26-2014, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,524,096 times
Reputation: 2935

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The Midwest core, not the Great Plains states.
Okay, okay, my Southern California suggestion didn't go over well, but I still can't really see the Midwest.

Ohio and Michigan, maybe. Illinois and Indiana, not as much. Minnesota and the Plains States, not all.

I feel that most of the Midwest is not diverse enough (in terms of people, culture, and economy) to be a microcosm for the country as a whole.

Maybe Pennsylvania or Virginia would be better?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-26-2014, 07:04 PM
 
12,699 posts, read 10,565,560 times
Reputation: 17639
Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post

If there is one thing about the good ol' US that the South exemplifies far more than any other region, it's an incredibly fierce love of independence. Southerners, by nature, are very patriotic and loyal to their families, their state and region, and their nation. It's sort of taken for granted in most other parts of the country.
Except during the Civil War when southern states, you know, seceded and attempted to create their own separate country.

Sorry, couldn't resist.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 07:05 PM
 
12,699 posts, read 10,565,560 times
Reputation: 17639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
When people in other parts of the world come see a unique region of America, they almost always gravitate to the South -- not the Midwest. The Midwest may indeed represent "middle America," but the South is a far more interesting, historic, scenic, mythological, romanticized and cultured region. All of America's most acclaimed music, literature, books, films, television shows and foods are SOUTHERN -- the facts don't lie. Most everybody knows what it means to be Southern, even people on the other side of the planet.

I have no idea what describes a Midwesterner.

Now, I know all the usual trolls are going to come back and tell me how the south is full of nothing but inbred racist hicks. The fact that you care so much says otherwise. If the south is really such a horrible place, why do you bother?
I agree with your first paragraph, and the single sentence that follows it. Well put.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 08:53 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,933,990 times
Reputation: 23222
When you get those maps that tell what nationality people are, the South always has more Ameicans than any other section.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 08:56 PM
 
12,699 posts, read 10,565,560 times
Reputation: 17639
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
When you get those maps that tell what nationality people are, the South always has more Ameicans than any other section.
We're all Americans. You're thinking ethnicity. Southerners tend to not get hung up on their ethnic roots, and report themselves as being "American" rather than Irish-American, German-American, Italian-American, etc. This may be because a lot of Southern families have been there for generations, probably came from England, and Southerners today feel few connections to their ancestors' roots, while those living in areas rich in immigration from the period of the 1880s-1920s (like the NYC area - Ellis Island) probably feel more connected to their ethnic roots, as their parents or grandparents probably immigrated.

Some Southern families have been in America for a long time, basically. It doesn't make everyone else less American, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:00 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,933,990 times
Reputation: 23222
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
We're all Americans. You're thinking ethnicity. Southerners tend to not get hung up on their ethnic roots, and report themselves as being "American" rather than Irish-American, German-American, Italian-American, etc. This may be because a lot of Southern families have been there for generations, probably came from England, and Southerners today feel few connections to their ancestors' roots, while those living in areas rich in immigration from the period of the 1880s-1920s (like the NYC area - Ellis Island) probably feel more connected to their ethnic roots, as their parents or grandparents probably immigrated.

Some Southern families have been in America for a long time, basically. It doesn't make everyone else less American, though.
I disagree. The blending of the ethnic roots is what makes us more American than others. We think of ourselves as American because that is who we are.

Race and ethnicity in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Actually it is the mountain areas that were isolated and still have the ancestor traits. We have always been and will always be the backbone of America.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:00 PM
 
37 posts, read 43,153 times
Reputation: 55
A lot of people used to mock southerners for flying the Confederate flag.

Now they mock us for flying the America flag and our patriotism. Hating America and self loathing is the new sophistication for many Americans. South doesn't see it that way though.

We've come full circle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Salinas, CA
15,128 posts, read 4,823,839 times
Reputation: 8147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
When people in other parts of the world come see a unique region of America, they almost always gravitate to the South -- not the Midwest. The Midwest may indeed represent "middle America," but the South is a far more interesting, historic, scenic, mythological, romanticized and cultured region. All of America's most acclaimed music, literature, books, films, television shows and foods are SOUTHERN -- the facts don't lie. Most everybody knows what it means to be Southern, even people on the other side of the planet.

I have no idea what describes a Midwesterner.

Now, I know all the usual trolls are going to come back and tell me how the south is full of nothing but inbred racist hicks. The fact that you care so much says otherwise. If the south is really such a horrible place, why do you bother?
I can't speak to knowledge of all Midwestern states, but I grew up in Minnesota and can point proudly to its contributions in these areas.

History: The history obviously can't match the Colonial eastern sites or Civil War southern sites, but they have protected Fort Snelling just a few miles from the Twin Cities airport and several sites related to French/Canadian fur trappers in northern Minnesota (Grand Portage) and some Native American sites in southern and western Minnesota (in Pipestone, Mankato, Fort Ridgely, New Ulm, etc). Duluth, Stillwater, Northfield, and several Mississippi River towns like Red Wing and Winona have historic districts intact and buildings on the National Register. St. Paul has done a good job with preserving Victorian architecture and features the longest continuous stretch of Victorian residences in the nation along Summit Avenue. Landmark Center is a historic preserved treasure featuring cultural events. Minneapolis has preserved its earliest city street in the St. Anthony Main district near the Mississippi, but tends to be the more modern of the two. The American Swedish Institute there is a nordic castle with Swedish decor, history, traditions, food in its restaurant and occasional music events.

No mention of history would be complete without stating that aviator Charles Lindbergh grew up in Little Falls, Minnesota.

Literature/books: Sinclair Lewis was the first American to win a Pulitzer prize for literature for his book: Main Street. Therefore, it counts as acclaimed literature and he was not from the South. You can change your post to "almost all" now. F. Scott Fitzgerald spent several of his prime writing years in St. Paul. The Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis is one of the nation's largest and is well attended by those interested in writing and literature. The Betsy-Tacy Society in Mankato is a museum featuring exhibits on the life and books primarily for children by author Maude Hart Lovelace. Poet Robert Bly is from Minnesota and has had a long, distinguished career and authored some popular books. The Minneapolis/St. Paul region is consistently in the top five in the nation for its literacy levels and the state of Minnesota similarly in the top five for its high school graduation rate.

Charles Schultz, who grew up in St. Paul, is still the most well known comic strip artist/author in America today well after his death and doubt that will change anytime soon! His annual cartoons are shown on TV during the holiday season. In Santa Rosa, CA there is a museum devoted to his life that I strongly recommend for any of his fans.

Higher education: The University of Minnesota is a well regarded research university that operates the 6th largest campus (based on enrollment) in the nation as well as several satellite campuses.

Nobel Conference: This will be the 50th year for the only Nobel Conference on the planet outside of Sweden at Gustavus Adolphus college in St. Peter. Scientific advancements and knowledge are shared here in various lectures, seminars, and debates. It is a shame that more people do not know about it. It has a much longer and accomplished history than TED in Aspen, CO, but is the lesser known of the two.

Rural MN debate series: The Great American Thinkoff is a debate series in tiny New York Mills (population is less than 2,000) in northwest MN that usually features a philosophical question that the four finalists, comprised of ordinary citizens rather than "experts" typically, discuss and debate annually in early June.

Music: The Andrews Sisters were from Minnesota and famous from the 1930's to the early 1960's. Polka in decades past was also prominent and old timers can still find it in some establishments (like Nye's Polonnaise in NE Minneapolis) to this day, but in the modern era MN has produced Bob Dylan, Eddie Cochran, Prince, Morris Day and the Time, The Replacements, Husker Du, Babes in Toyland, The Suburbs, Suicide Commandos, Johnny Lang, Soul Asylum and countless others.

Bobby McFerrin actually lived in Minnesota for awhile back in the mid to late 1990's when he accepted a position with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. Festivals representing rock music that often includes local/regional talent (in several cities and regions), the blues (most notably Duluth's Bayfront Blues event for more than 25 years now), hip hop/rap festival with national acts but also including some local talent like Doomtree and Atmosphere (at the Soundset festival in the TC suburb of Shakopee); country music festivals (most notably the WE Fest in Detroit Lakes in northwest MN...one of the nation's largest). Concert halls and clubs featuring live music in the Twin Cities region are just too numerous to mention here. First Avenue is perhaps the best nationally known from the movie Purple Rain. Garrison Keillor has featured numerous musicians on his Prairie Home Companion show. Lawrence Welk grew up in North Dakota, but frequently used musicians from the Minneapolis region and other MN cities to appear on his show. Classical concerts and music festivals are also part of the scene.

Theater: Minneapolis has the Tony award winning Guthrie theater and in early August the city will again play host to one of the most popular fringe festivals in the country featuring well over 800 performances in 11 days. Way too many other options to mention here and I am probably pissing some people off with the long post as it is. LOL.

The region has several art museums including the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Walker Art Center, the Frederick Weisman Museum designed by Frank Gehry, and the Russian Museum of Art. There is also the Science Museum of Minnesota and the Bakken Museum of Electricity. Not a complete list to be sure.

Movies, television: Joel and Ethan Coen grew up in a Minneapolis suburb and have produced Oscar award winner Fargo, No Country for Old Men and many other quality films that do not fit with the cookie cutter formula for typical Hollywood movies. TV shows have included Mary Tyler Moore and Coach. Movies filmed there include Fargo, Mighty Ducks, Joe Somebody and perhaps regrettably...Mallrats. LOL. Actors from Minnesota include Judy Garland, Peter Graves, James Arness, Loni Anderson, Josh Hartnett, Kelly Lynch, Steve Zahn, Rachael Leigh Cook, and Sean William Scott. Comedians Louie Anderson and Liz Winstead also grew up in MN and still perform there on occasion. The quirky Mystery Science Theater 3000 was produced and filmed in Eden Prairie, a Minneapolis suburb.

There is no lack of quality food and scenery. Minneapolis had the nation's first certified organic bakery cafe (French Meadow). The local delicacy Walleye fish usually with a side of wild rice or as a Walleye fish taco can be enjoyed along with numerous ethnic options. James Beard nominee restaurants like Alma, Eatery 112, and several others are in the Twin Cities. Guy Fieri has featured several of the state's eateries on his popular "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" show including some you might not expect like Victor 1959 Cafe with its Cuban food and Emily's Lebanese Deli, both in Minneapolis. The region has a plethora of farm to table, organic dining and several co-op grocery stores. Some cities outside the TC region also have them these days.

The state has well over 10,000 lakes, a 170 shoreline on Lake Superior, several forests and rivers. The Chain of Lakes in Minneapolis is an urban park lover's oasis with miles of bike/walking trails and the Lake Harriet bandshell with its popular summer music series. Three major river systems in the region provide additional scenery and recreation as well. Lake Minnetonka is a huge and popular lake just west of Minneapolis with a few charming towns to explore, shop and dine in and has great water recreation. The St. Croix River provides similar enjoyment east of St. Paul with Minnesota's oldest town of Stillwater as the featured town to explore and enjoy with its history, recreation, antique stores, bed and breakfast inns, and dining, along with some nightlife.

Finally, how many southeastern cities have all four major league sports represented like Minneapolis/St. Paul (MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL)? I believe just two: Atlanta and Miami.

Not only that, they just hosted a successful MLB All Star game and were recently chosen over New Orleans to host the 2018 Super Bowl. It was the first time New Orleans failed in 11 previous bids.

The Mall of America is the largest enclosed mall in the nation. It is being expanded, too!

The state is also civilized and tolerant enough to have allowed people of the same sex to marry for over a year now. We have yet to see any southern states sign on just yet. On the downside, those winters can be cold. More than enough to compensate for it, though.

Some of America's acclaimed music, literature, entertainment and food is outside the southern region. If it only takes a few sentences to describe a region or state, it does not offer much. Having said that, the South offers a lot too. Exaggeration is fun, but easily countered. OK, I am done now. LOL.

Last edited by chessgeek; 07-26-2014 at 10:31 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:08 PM
 
29,985 posts, read 27,535,697 times
Reputation: 18578
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
I disagree. The blending of the ethnic roots is what makes us more American than others. We think of ourselves as American because that is who we are.

Race and ethnicity in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Actually it is the mountain areas that were isolated and still have the ancestor traits.
JerseyGirl415 is correct. The South wasn't a big recipient of the immigrant wave the country experienced in the late 19th/early 20th century, which is why our cities lack the ethnic enclaves that you see in Midwestern and Northern cities which allowed those immigrants to be more connected to their European roots.

More discussion about this subject can be found here: Why do southerners put "American" as their ancestry on the census?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2014, 09:15 PM
 
12,699 posts, read 10,565,560 times
Reputation: 17639
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
I disagree. The blending of the ethnic roots is what makes us more American than others. We think of ourselves as American because that is who we are.

Race and ethnicity in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Actually it is the mountain areas that were isolated and still have the ancestor traits. We have always been and will always be the backbone of America.
Okay, I'm a bit confused. Who is "we"?

I agree that the blending of ethnic roots is what makes Americans "American", but identifying as "American" only, rather than Italian-American, doesn't necessarily mean a person has various ethnicities and is simply choosing to be called an American (like I said - it could mean their family came from England in 1750 and that's about it). People often choose to call themselves what they most identify with ethnically - those who say they're Italian-American on those maps likely aren't 100% Italian-American, but are probably predominantly Italian-American, or identify with it most. My family comes from 3-4 European countries but I choose to predominantly identify myself with just one, because I am "most" that ethnicity but first and foremost I am an American. My ethnicity is of a few European countries, but my nationality is American.

This is getting kind of irrelevant so we shouldn't continue with it, but it is definitely true that Southerners tend to simply identify as "American," ignoring their ethnicities for whatever reason. Unless you're a Native American, you aren't ethnically American. Most Americans at this point are ethnically some type of European, especially Southerners - who are also commonly black, so ethnically African or from somewhere in the Caribbean.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top