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Old 06-13-2015, 02:24 PM
 
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I say yes, people are more impressed by scenery they are not used to seeing. For example, I have lived in El Paso, TX my whole life. Around here, all we really have is desert, shrub, brown dirt and brown stubby things we call mountains. I have never been very impressed. However, when I went up to visit family in southwest Washington, I was absolutely amazed. The greenery, the forest, the rivers, the REAL snow capped mountains, just all the trees, everything about it impressed me and I immediately fell in love. But when my relatives came to Texas they were blown away by how dry and rocky everything was. I do think it is personal preference as well, because I know desert junkies who lived in the desert their whole life and love it. In response to bonus question, I vote no, many people love where they live and are always blown away by how beautiful the world is.
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Old 06-13-2015, 02:52 PM
 
Location: The South
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I have visited all fifty states and all are impressive, however not everyone is a mountain person. Mountains are nice to look at, but I prefer flat piney woods. Different strokes for different folks.
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Old 06-13-2015, 02:59 PM
 
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I found the green hilly farmland in Iowa amazing because aside from in small pockets, there's nothing like it out West. I think it's beautiful in its own way.

Illinois - now that's a flat boring state!
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Old 06-13-2015, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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I'm from the Pacific Northwest, so I'm used to pine forests, snow-capped (maybe not so much this year) mountains, and coasts lined with cliffs. I sometimes get surprised by scenery in my own state. I live on the eastern side of the Cascades, so our landscape is more sagebrush and brown, and the ponderosa forests sparse and not densely packed. I went on a trip to the Northern part of the Oregon Coast (around Cannon Beach) last summer, and hiked through the Tillamook Head Trail, and was amazed at the lush, green, and dense vegetation that is in such contrast to the part of the state I'm from.

When I visited my aunt and uncle in Omaha, NE, it was definitely wasn't as flat as I had anticipated. I liked the rolling hills of farmland that were just outside the city, and how you could see the stormclouds rolling in from miles away.

I visited the East Coast a few summers back, but my time was spent mainly in Manhattan, so I didn't see any of the Northeast's scenery
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Old 06-13-2015, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
I found the green hilly farmland in Iowa amazing because aside from in small pockets, there's nothing like it out West. I think it's beautiful in its own way.

Illinois - now that's a flat boring state!
IL has green, hilly farmland, green flat farmland, river valleys, bluffs, part of the Driftless, more forest than IA, a national forest, and a Great Lake. I fail to see how one could be mesmerized by IA and find IL boring. Every state in this country has its own beauty.
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Old 06-14-2015, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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I live in the shadow of the lush green Smoky Mountains, and they are beautiful. There is also beauty in the arid open spaces of the west, and I am always stunned by that openness when I see it. Its just so different from what I am used too. I know that people from the west are equally stunned by our greenery, and the lush green mountains. Its just so different from what they are used too. Ive said it in other similar threads, we are lucky to have all this geographic diversity in this nation.
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Old 06-14-2015, 03:53 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
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I'm from flatland MD (yes I know there are mountains here but nowhere near me). When I moved to FL my first time I was captivated by the palm trees and crystal clear water. Then I took a boat to Venezuela and 60 miles from the coast the mountains came into view. Very impressive and I never got over the "overall" scenery of the 600ft average height coastal mountains going to the sea for the 20 or so month's I spent there. Then I went on to Costa Rica and, though the mountains were lower (a lot like the Appalachians) it was still pretty. And the rain forrests of Panama and CR. Then we headed up the Pacific to Cabo San Lucas and it was a very different feel as the scenery went from rain forest and greenery in Central America to full on dessert by the time we made Cabo.

The one shared similarity was that it was rugged, as in mountainous the whole way up. Especially in regards to the flatness I had been used to in both MD's eastern shore and S. FL were I lived. When I came back every summer to MD I will admit that the eastern shores corn and bean fields and winding and marshy rivers and coastal bays plus the Chesapeake held their own against all the truly breathtaking places I had been to the previous dozen years or so.

In regards to the last question (I see now that this is an old thread though), yes and no. At least to me the novelty of some of the smaller things (like FL's and other places palm trees and tropical vegetation) will wear off in time, I don't think the overall scenery of the places do if you really like it.
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Old 06-14-2015, 10:20 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
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Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Yes. I was amazed the first time I went to Arkansas, my first time seeing any kind of mountain in real life. I'm sure people are amazed when they pass through our swamps and wetlands, that is if they have never seen any so vast before.
This is a great example. People from the Great Plains or Deep South tend to be impressed by the Ozarks. People from the Appalachians or the Rockies tend to not be as impressed.
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Old 06-15-2015, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
This is a great example. People from the Great Plains or Deep South tend to be impressed by the Ozarks. People from the Appalachians or the Rockies tend to not be as impressed.

They are not big but still pretty. Arkansas is a nice state.
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Old 06-15-2015, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbell75 View Post
I have lived in southern California most my life between the desert and the beach area. Trips to Vegas, Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Lake Tahoe etc...some awesome places. Driving cross country along Interstate 10 was very blah. Not really much of a wow factor in any state at all unless you consider the US/Mexico border in El Paso amazing My friend was like "Did a bomb go off on those houses up there" and I was like nope, thats just Mexico. Been to 27 states and aside from something like Times Square in NY and Niagara Falls, I can't think of anything that really jumped out at me. Kinda hard to be impressed by the scenery in the south or the midwest when you have scenery like this to look at every day
Interesting. This hasn't been my experience at all. I've lived on both the east coast and the west coast and traveled to most of the states in the US, and I'm always impressed by the different topography and landscapes and vegetation, as well as the differences in culture.

And I love traveling through the differing terrains. In my opinion, every state and every region has it's beautiful and unique vistas and views.

By the way, driving along ANY interstate is usually pretty boring. I make it a point to get OFF interstates whenever possible.
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