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Old 07-22-2014, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,132,244 times
Reputation: 7075

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So, I have lived in the coastal Northeast my entire life, so I'm used to seeing lots of deciduous greenery with hilly terrain. However, when I went out west last month, I was AMAZED at the scenery. Specifically, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Washington, Oregon and California.

Now, if someone who has lived out west their entire life traveled out to say, the Northeast (for example), would they be equally as AMAZED at the scenery as someone from the Northeast was equally amazed at the scenery out West?

In other words, is there a 1:1 relationship between scenic impression between ANY two places in the U.S.? Is scenic impression a relative concept? Or is one type of scenery absolutely more impressive than another?

Another example would be, say, between Michigan and Florida. If a Florida native traveled up to Michigan, would they be amazed at Michigan scenery in the same way as a Michigan native might be amazed at seeing Florida scenery for the first time?


Bonus topic/question (because I don't want to make another thread): Do you think the novelty of scenery wears off after a while, after moving to any particular place?
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Old 07-22-2014, 09:55 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,486,883 times
Reputation: 3543
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
So, I have lived in the coastal Northeast my entire life, so I'm used to seeing lots of deciduous greenery with hilly terrain. However, when I went out west last month, I was AMAZED at the scenery. Specifically, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Washington, Oregon and California.

Now, if someone who has lived out west their entire life traveled out to say, the Northeast (for example), would they be equally as AMAZED at the scenery as someone from the Northeast was equally amazed at the scenery out West?

In other words, is there a 1:1 relationship between scenic impression between ANY two places in the U.S.? Is scenic impression a relative concept? Or is one type of scenery absolutely more impressive than another?

Another example would be, say, between Michigan and Florida. If a Florida native traveled up to Michigan, would they be amazed at Michigan scenery in the same way as a Michigan native might be amazed at seeing Florida scenery for the first time?


Bonus topic/question (because I don't want to make another thread): Do you think the novelty of scenery wears off after a while, after moving to any particular place?
Any real answer to this question would quickly turn so philosophical as to be useless. Taking that first step on the road to nowhere: in sophomore year in high school, there was New Girl. Unspeakably attractive. By Senior year, she was cute. But only because other girls, um, acquired more varied topography.

My reaction upon visiting many parts of the country is "cute", personalities aside. Been there, definitely attractive, but...get real.

Answer to bonus question: no.
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,774,924 times
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Yes. I was amazed the first time I went to Arkansas, my first time seeing any kind of mountain in real life. I'm sure people are amazed when they pass through our swamps and wetlands, that is if they have never seen any so vast before.
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,421 posts, read 16,973,844 times
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I think the answer is "yes." You are always impressed by scenery different than what you're used to, even if it's a minor difference. For example, I live in Georgia but I can travel up and down the east coast and still admire and appreciate the differences in landscape. I know people out west may not recognize the subtle difference between, say, Coastal Georgia and Florida, but I do.
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,132,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Yes. I was amazed the first time I went to Arkansas, my first time seeing any kind of mountain in real life. I'm sure people are amazed when they pass through our swamps and wetlands, that is if they have never seen any so vast before.
Yeah, I have been to Louisiana and was quite amazed at the vast swamp land and bayous. It was impressive.
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,774,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Yeah, I have been to Louisiana and was quite amazed at the vast swamp land and bayous. It was impressive.
There you go.

I was in awe while visiting Austin, don't remember seeing anything like it (Hill Country) while staying in Waco.
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:18 PM
 
Location: O.C.
2,821 posts, read 2,752,450 times
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I have lived in southern California most my life between the desert and the beach area. Trips to Vegas, Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Lake Tahoe etc...some awesome places. Driving cross country along Interstate 10 was very blah. Not really much of a wow factor in any state at all unless you consider the US/Mexico border in El Paso amazing My friend was like "Did a bomb go off on those houses up there" and I was like nope, thats just Mexico. Been to 27 states and aside from something like Times Square in NY and Niagara Falls, I can't think of anything that really jumped out at me. Kinda hard to be impressed by the scenery in the south or the midwest when you have scenery like this to look at every day
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Does being impressed by scenery depend on where you come from?-best-beaches-california.jpg  
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 677,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbell75 View Post
I have lived in southern California most my life between the desert and the beach area. Trips to Vegas, Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Lake Tahoe etc...some awesome places. Driving cross country along Interstate 10 was very blah. Not really much of a wow factor in any state at all unless you consider the US/Mexico border in El Paso amazing My friend was like "Did a bomb go off on those houses up there" and I was like nope, thats just Mexico. Been to 27 states and aside from something like Times Square in NY and Niagara Falls, I can't think of anything that really jumped out at me. Kinda hard to be impressed by the scenery in the south or the midwest when you have scenery like this to look at every day
There are many different types of beauty. Your picture is definitely beautiful. With an open mind, one can appreciate different types. I don't understand how someone couldn't find beauty in the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina or the white sand beaches of Florida, among other places.
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 677,061 times
Reputation: 1091
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
So, I have lived in the coastal Northeast my entire life, so I'm used to seeing lots of deciduous greenery with hilly terrain. However, when I went out west last month, I was AMAZED at the scenery. Specifically, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Washington, Oregon and California.

Now, if someone who has lived out west their entire life traveled out to say, the Northeast (for example), would they be equally as AMAZED at the scenery as someone from the Northeast was equally amazed at the scenery out West?

In other words, is there a 1:1 relationship between scenic impression between ANY two places in the U.S.? Is scenic impression a relative concept? Or is one type of scenery absolutely more impressive than another?

Another example would be, say, between Michigan and Florida. If a Florida native traveled up to Michigan, would they be amazed at Michigan scenery in the same way as a Michigan native might be amazed at seeing Florida scenery for the first time?


Bonus topic/question (because I don't want to make another thread): Do you think the novelty of scenery wears off after a while, after moving to any particular place?
I do think people are often amazed at the beauty in different sections of the country, especially when it offers a much different look from where they live. As to the bonus question, I do think the novelty wears off somewhat but not completely. When you leave and go back, even after a short time like a week, you see things with fresher eyes again and appreciate them better. At least that happens to me.
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:54 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,913,467 times
Reputation: 6424
Default Does being impressed by scenery depend on where you come from?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
So, I have lived in the coastal Northeast my entire life, so I'm used to seeing lots of deciduous greenery with hilly terrain. However, when I went out west last month, I was AMAZED at the scenery. Specifically, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Washington, Oregon and California.

Now, if someone who has lived out west their entire life traveled out to say, the Northeast (for example), would they be equally as AMAZED at the scenery as someone from the Northeast was equally amazed at the scenery out West?

In other words, is there a 1:1 relationship between scenic impression between ANY two places in the U.S.? Is scenic impression a relative concept? Or is one type of scenery absolutely more impressive than another?

Another example would be, say, between Michigan and Florida. If a Florida native traveled up to Michigan, would they be amazed at Michigan scenery in the same way as a Michigan native might be amazed at seeing Florida scenery for the first time?


Bonus topic/question (because I don't want to make another thread): Do you think the novelty of scenery wears off after a while, after moving to any particular place?
I would say yes and no.

Yes, someone from say California might be impressed by the green abundance of Connecticut while the guy from Connecticut will be impressed by the grand 10,000 foot mountains of California.

But also no because while some parts of California have their own extensive greenery, Connecticut does not have any 10,000 foot mountains. So it is not exactly equal.
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