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Old 07-25-2014, 07:34 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,080 posts, read 5,461,473 times
Reputation: 4337

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
maybe the desert areas of the country should embrace their environment instead of trying to turn it into something it obviously is not
Have you ever tried to ebrace rocks, cacti and sand? It can be very scratchy, prickly, and uncomfortable.
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Old 07-25-2014, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,043,853 times
Reputation: 2699
The first cities were in deserts and those places are still heavily populated. Hundreds of millions still live in deserts across the Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. Those cities have been sustained for thousands of years. Here's a another thread with a bunch of posts from the Midwest and East by people who don't have a clue about deserts. I don't even want a water pipeline from the East but I'm noticing the same places so opposed to the idea have to receive massive amounts of energy/resources to keep from freezing to death for months at a time. I guess next time there's a blizzard making roads impassable and knocking out power we should just hold back clearing snow and let people freeze because we shouldn't encourage people living in such a hostile environment, right? The whole issue of whether it should or shouldn't happen won't matter anyway because when someone has extra of something to sell, needs cash, and people are buying, opinions go out the window.
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Old 07-25-2014, 09:40 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,147 posts, read 9,932,098 times
Reputation: 6429
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
The first cities were in deserts and those places are still heavily populated. Hundreds of millions still live in deserts across the Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. Those cities have been sustained for thousands of years. Here's a another thread with a bunch of posts from the Midwest and East by people who don't have a clue about deserts. I don't even want a water pipeline from the East but I'm noticing the same places so opposed to the idea have to receive massive amounts of energy/resources to keep from freezing to death for months at a time. I guess next time there's a blizzard making roads impassable and knocking out power we should just hold back clearing snow and let people freeze because we shouldn't encourage people living in such a hostile environment, right? The whole issue of whether it should or shouldn't happen won't matter anyway because when someone has extra of something to sell, needs cash, and people are buying, opinions go out the window.
The first cities that were in deserts were built along rivers like the Nile River in Egypt or the Tigris & Euphrates in what is now Iraq. And these cities lived in harmony with their environment. They did not keep building until they ran out of water and use their water for constant new developments, for golf courses or mega factory farms.

The problem I see of building a huge water distribution network from lets say the Mississippi River System or the Great Lakes to the Southwest is that once its built it would only further encourage wasteful water practices in the Southwest. And then they would need to take more and more water. When will it stop???
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Old 07-25-2014, 09:48 AM
 
11,189 posts, read 22,415,451 times
Reputation: 10943
Why go dump tons of water from where it naturally occurs to where it isn't supposed to be? No, if you want water, don't live in the desert.

Those cities in the middle east that are in the desert have naturally occurring water sources and have for thousands of years in some cases. It's not like the southwest, where they don't have the resources but just keep building anyway and trying to poach the water from elsewhere. It's earth, it's the environment, just deal with it.
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Old 07-25-2014, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,389 posts, read 21,961,490 times
Reputation: 33682
Las Vegas is scrambling to drill a new tunnel to Lake Mead because they are reaching a point where the existing two tunnels will soon be above the dropping water level....gotta keep those swimming pools topped off you know.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/06/us...ates.html?_r=0
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Old 07-25-2014, 10:13 AM
 
Location: california
5,677 posts, read 4,896,780 times
Reputation: 6694
River beds that have been directed to the ocean, should have been made reservoirs. =poor planning democrats in action, or the lack there of.
There are too many people in California.and too much waste on "public land beautification" not lending to intelligent thinking.
Democrats operate on the premise that if they don't use up a resource, they won't get it allocated next year's budget.
There is no respect for nature either, they just use nature for excuses, rather then take responsibility for poor planing.
The border problem is a standing example of their immaturity.
I've been here almost 64 years (born here). this is not an out side speculation .
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Old 07-25-2014, 11:32 AM
 
912 posts, read 860,126 times
Reputation: 1562
What is boils down to is this -- if you live in a dry, arid area, then things like daily watering the lawn, weekly washing the car -- should be ILLEGAL.

It's not that people can't live there, but you need to adapt to your environment. People lived in deserts for hundreds of years because they didn't TRY to grow grass. Or wash anything that wasn't in desperate need of it. They understood conservation.

As for the wet/flooding areas -- same rules apply. DON'T BUILD directly next to lakes/rivers/oceans. I felt horribly for the beach homes during hurricane Sandy, but I think mother nature was trying to tell us something....

Transporting water across the country is a bad idea. Learn to live within your means and your environment. If you need to water grass, then move to a wet area.

This is all common sense.
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Old 07-25-2014, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,426 posts, read 17,002,626 times
Reputation: 9513
Quote:
Originally Posted by arleigh View Post
River beds that have been directed to the ocean, should have been made reservoirs. =poor planning democrats in action, or the lack there of.
There are too many people in California.and too much waste on "public land beautification" not lending to intelligent thinking.
Democrats operate on the premise that if they don't use up a resource, they won't get it allocated next year's budget.
There is no respect for nature either, they just use nature for excuses, rather then take responsibility for poor planing.
The border problem is a standing example of their immaturity.
I've been here almost 64 years (born here). this is not an out side speculation .
WHAT?! ALL rivers eventually flow into oceans NATURALLY! ALL rivers! And even those that are dammed must still have an outflow, to support communities and ecology down River as well as to prevent massive flooding up River.

DID YOU KNOW that the Colorado River is supposed to drain into the Pacific via Baja, but the flow has been dry for years because the water is diverted for other uses? Or that the Owens Valley in California used to be one of the most fertile agriculture regions in the United States until Los Angeles STOLE the water and turned it into an arid wasteland? Or that ALL FIVE of the Great Lakes empty into the North Atlantic via the St. Lawrence Seaway? Or that the Mississippi River isn't just a very long river that drains half of the continental US, but it forms the Mississippi Delta -- one of the most fertile agriculture regions of the country -- and feeds the rich ecology of the Louisiana bayou and Gulf of Mexico.

When you divert water from any one place to another where it was not naturally intended, you risk doing enormous damage to the Eco-system that often can't be reversed.

PS -- Nice try making this the Democrats fault. As a 64-yo native Californian, who has lived his entire life in one of te most water-challenged states in the country, you certainly share part of the blame.

Last edited by Newsboy; 07-25-2014 at 12:28 PM..
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Old 07-25-2014, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
2,032 posts, read 4,043,853 times
Reputation: 2699
To all posters who were unaware; Phoenix and Albuquerque are located on natural rivers. Both are situated where the most water is in their states. Water flows downhill from green mountains into desert valleys. If more people reside in Phoenix than there is water their water bills will increase. If the water bill gets too high people will leave. It's a supply and demand issue that will correct itself, not to mention, agriculture is still the biggest water use. When agriculture in the Southwest becomes too expensive much more water will be available.
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Old 07-25-2014, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,426 posts, read 17,002,626 times
Reputation: 9513
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
To all posters who were unaware; Phoenix and Albuquerque are located on natural rivers. Both are situated where the most water is in their states. Water flows downhill from green mountains into desert valleys. If more people reside in Phoenix than there is water their water bills will increase. If the water bill gets too high people will leave. It's a supply and demand issue that will correct itself, not to mention, agriculture is still the biggest water use. When agriculture in the Southwest becomes too expensive much more water will be available.
And we will all starve to death.

BTW ... In Georgia, I pay about $23 a month for water and sewer service. What do you pay?
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