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Old 07-26-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Allendale MI
2,532 posts, read 1,896,781 times
Reputation: 698

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NASA Satellites Reveal Shocking Groundwater Loss In Colorado River Basin
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Old 07-26-2014, 08:27 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,946,011 times
Reputation: 1858
Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
"We" destroyed the delta? How about you too when you buy produce? Or are you going to tell you only shop local farmers market? Agriculture is responsible for the most use, even in West CO, UT and down. You're arrogant to blame me for decisions made way before I was born in an agriculture industry I don't have control over. Phoenix gets most of its water from the Salt, not the Colorado, but you probably knew that since the delta's your greatest passion in life. You ought to go to the border by Yuma and start a one man extended protest or go around and demand all your local restaurants and grocery stores to stop carrying lettuce and spinach grown with Colorado river, or just cry yourself to sleep looking at black and white photos of the delta, whatever shows you care. Whats really disgusting is that you and so many of these other posters would rather see my hometown where I grew up and all my friends, family, and memories are, disappear for to benefit a swamp in Mexico. Thanks.
Uh, MOST of the produce comes from the Midwest where water naturally exists....

I don't care if it is for irrigation, grow it somewhere else. The Midwest/East is far from out of land, and it is naturally wet enough to grow plants. You can easily stay warm enough in Southeast Texas through Florida for any plants that are sensitive to cold.


I love how you have to result to hyperbole about me instead of sticking to the issue... trying to use my concern over the destruction of a unique ecosystem as a way to somehow discredit me? Just making crap up about my interest level with no evidence to your claims. Lol, claiming the delta is "my greatest passion", HA HA, COMPLETELY unsubstantiated claim.....

Regardless, I don't buy your points at all. You are going to sit there and tell me that 10's of millions of people have no appreciable effect and it is ALL farming, LOL!

I don't know why you brought up Phoenix, nobody is speaking about Phoenix but you, everbody else is talking about the whole Southwest.... but good on you for knowing that Phoenix gets just over 50% of it's water from the Salt. (Like it matters )

(Oh and you shouldn't make assumptions, 70-80% of the produce I eat is grown on my property, with water that falls on my property... The other stuff is mostly grown in the Midwest.)

LOL, this picture is very telling, compare the wilderness to the homes next to it, you seem to think that this takes no water.... Phoenix Suburb


You can move, ecosystems like the Colorado River Delta can't. I never said anything about anyone "disappearing"... just more silly hyperbole.
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Old 07-26-2014, 09:03 PM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,538,210 times
Reputation: 17611
I know a lot of crops are grown west (midwest and west), but they're obviously also grown in the east. A lot of my summer produce is local, from NJ or NY. We have great summer crops around here - corn, tomatoes, peaches, blueberries. Believe it or not, NJ is known for having great summer produce (we are called the Garden State for a reason) - most notably the crops I mentioned. "Jersey tomatoes," "Jersey corn"… we rely on the west in the colder months for produce, but in the warmer ones, we have local produce. My town even has its own little farm open from March-November, selling stuff all made/grown on site or regionally…

It's not like all of our food comes from the western US, and that we easterners are somehow partially responsible for droughts because we buy western crops that use up water.
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Old 07-26-2014, 09:06 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,946,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I know a lot of crops are grown west (midwest and west), but they're obviously also grown in the east. A lot of my summer produce is local, from NJ or NY. We have great summer crops around here - corn, tomatoes, peaches, blueberries. Believe it or not, NJ is known for having great summer produce (we are called the Garden State for a reason) - most notably the crops I mentioned. "Jersey tomatoes," "Jersey corn"… we rely on the west in the colder months for produce, but in the warmer ones, we have local produce. My town even has its own little farm open from March-November, selling stuff all made/grown on site or regionally…

It's not like all of our food comes from the western US.
A majority doesn't come from the western U.S. A great majority comes from the eastern Great Plains, the Midwest, the south and the east.
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Old 07-27-2014, 09:04 AM
 
912 posts, read 859,738 times
Reputation: 1562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
A majority doesn't come from the western U.S. A great majority comes from the eastern Great Plains, the Midwest, the south and the east.
I was wondering about this too. I'm not sure what, if any, of the produce we buy comes from the Southwest. Midwest, and Southeast, (during winter), definitely. Spring, Fall & Summer, it's all local.
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,329,578 times
Reputation: 4270
Don't mess with Mother Nature!
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,329,578 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
I pay $25 a month in Albuquerque. The Rio Grande has a large aquifer under the city. Yes there is grass, trees, and two swimming pools on the grounds I live on. Reading the tone of this thread you'd think they would want to send me to the gallows, but I'm not going to apologize for it. Agriculture takes the lions share of the water resources in the Southwest so unless Americans are cool with the idea of importing more produce they are going to continue growing it out here as places like Arizona and California have ideal climate conditions to do it.
It's the people who want natural soft grass in their yards, swimming pools, golf courses with (again) grass instead of rock and other natural features, and water their lawns when it rains or during the middle of the day when the sun is at its peak that should be "sent to the gallows".
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,329,578 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
You won't find any of that on Google, but you will find lots of trees, lush green hills, lakes and streams, mountains and seashore. Georgia is a beautiful state.
Lakes? Real lakes?
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Old 07-28-2014, 12:39 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,227 posts, read 17,988,164 times
Reputation: 14678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Lakes? Real lakes?
I live an hour away from Lakes Hartwell, Lanier and Oconee.
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Old 07-29-2014, 07:01 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,448 posts, read 18,367,813 times
Reputation: 11928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
It's the people who want natural soft grass in their yards, swimming pools, golf courses with (again) grass instead of rock and other natural features, and water their lawns when it rains or during the middle of the day when the sun is at its peak that should be "sent to the gallows".
Well, that's lovely but you live on the other side of the country so you need not worry about telling me how I should live. Yes I went for a swim in the pool last night (it was nice) and the sprinklers came on after the sun went down. The desert is always the easiest scapegoat, as if there was no ecological destruction in other parts of the country. But I guess we're the first ones that should marched to the gallows. Whatever.
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