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Old 07-29-2014, 09:16 AM
 
13,250 posts, read 17,789,000 times
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We rode bikes in Opal - beer bet. I would not recommend that unless you are a couple of marbles short.

Weather is a force to take seriously but not to fear. Use common sense, be prepared, do not forget others as you may be the one with supplies who can make a difference. Our cars have summer and winter emergency boxes (water, food, blankets, first aid, umbrella, gloves). We have a cooler on the front porch with a sign "water help yourself, aqua fina gratis" - it is empty by the end of the week. Thermos and plastic cups during the miserable blizzard days.

Of course thunderstorms on the open prairie are a spectacle. If you and yours are safe on the ground. So are blizzards and black ice.
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Old 07-29-2014, 07:05 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,966,293 times
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Storms is terrible. It's like, why you gotta blow my house to pieces?
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Old 07-30-2014, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,840 posts, read 36,186,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Storms is terrible. It's like, why you gotta blow my house to pieces?
It's actually uncommon to have true storm damage to a home, in Texas or the south. For instance, I've lived in the southern states for forty years, and in Texas for 25 years, right in Tornado Alley, and I've only had significant storm damage once or twice (I had to replace my roof thanks to Hurricane Ike, and I had some siding damage one time due to high winds but that damage wasn't serious). The odds of serious property damage are VERY low - it's more like it's the THREAT of the damage that freaks some people out. I mean, when you're hunkered down in a small, windowless interior room with a pillow over your head and your two large dogs freaking out during a tornado warning, it IS a sort of alarming experience - but the odds of your home actually being hit or damaged are really very low.
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Old 07-30-2014, 09:08 AM
 
Location: 'Back in the midst of a world gone mad'
165 posts, read 151,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
It's actually uncommon to have true storm damage to a home, in Texas or the south. For instance, I've lived in the southern states for forty years, and in Texas for 25 years, right in Tornado Alley, and I've only had significant storm damage once or twice (I had to replace my roof thanks to Hurricane Ike, and I had some siding damage one time due to high winds but that damage wasn't serious). The odds of serious property damage are VERY low - it's more like it's the THREAT of the damage that freaks some people out. I mean, when you're hunkered down in a small, windowless interior room with a pillow over your head and your two large dogs freaking out during a tornado warning, it IS a sort of alarming experience - but the odds of your home actually being hit or damaged are really very low.
LOL!!
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Old 07-30-2014, 04:31 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,942,274 times
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How bad?

Don't you mean how good? (I love storms)

Texas gets HUGE super-cell storms that make you feel completely insignificant. They are truly awe inspiring. Most storm damage is avoidable especially tornadoes. Just pay attention to the weather.

The south can be more dangerous because of limited lines of visibility, but again, stay informed, you'll be fine. The lack of visibility is more of a concern for us who chase.
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Old 07-30-2014, 05:02 PM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,745,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
How bad?

Don't you mean how good? (I love storms)

Texas gets HUGE super-cell storms that make you feel completely insignificant. They are truly awe inspiring. Most storm damage is avoidable especially tornadoes. Just pay attention to the weather.

The south can be more dangerous because of limited lines of visibility, but again, stay informed, you'll be fine. The lack of visibility is more of a concern for us who chase.
This. The thing I've noticed about people from, say, the West Coast or the Northeast, is that they haven't developed the weather eye that southerners or midwesterners have.

That's not a knock on them at all. It's just that we typically have to deal with it any number of times a year. When the air gets that greasy, restless feel, you know to check a weather site. And if it gets bad, you turn on your local news station, keep it on, and hunker down.

In those regions, the weather forecasters are seriously good and stay on air for as long as it takes--and there are relatively few surprises. Here's a good example from the April 27, 2011 outbreak:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vI5TONMSYtE
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Old 07-30-2014, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,840 posts, read 36,186,607 times
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I always say that when the air gets very still and heavy and there's a greenish tint outside, hold on to your hats because you're about to be in for a rough ride!

I absolutely love our big Texas storms though. Even while Ike was tearing my roof off, I was glued to the big window watching the awesome enormity of the wind outside. It was amazing.

Here is a shot of a typical summer storm brewing (taken from my patio) - this one wasn't even particularly spectacular when it was all said and done. This photo was taken at about 4 pm.




Here is a cold front (some rain and wind but not too bad) moving in, as seen from my parents' back porch in Arkansas:
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