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Old 08-01-2014, 10:20 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 832,787 times
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Boston's urban renewal projects of the 60's. It's either the destruction of the Westend or the destruction of Scollay Square to put up Boston's "beautiful" new city hall.
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Old 08-01-2014, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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There is a paper products plant in my hometown's downtown. The smell and pollution is overpowering. Downtown should have been moved years ago. The plants have retarded development.
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Old 08-01-2014, 11:28 AM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,940,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
There is a paper products plant in my hometown's downtown. The smell and pollution is overpowering. Downtown should have been moved years ago. The plants have retarded development.
Would it not be easier to move the plants?
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Old 08-01-2014, 11:32 AM
 
63 posts, read 61,104 times
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Negligence on the part of commerce. The province I live in is very, aware of the government, we'll just say. It doesn't value economics very highly. A lot of the downtown is monopolized by government buildings and organizations and there really isn't much of a shopping scene whatsoever. Add to that the city's accommodation of drunkards and derelicts and no one bothers to go down there anymore.

Last edited by SillyBum; 08-01-2014 at 11:40 AM..
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Old 08-01-2014, 11:37 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,258,456 times
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In 2009, our city removed a car lane and created two bike lanes at a cost of $60k.
less than 2 years later the city council voted to reserve the decision and put the car lane back and remove the bike lane for a cost of $300,000.
this is how political bickering results in wasteful government spending.
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Old 08-01-2014, 11:42 AM
 
4,649 posts, read 3,612,991 times
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Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
For my old hometown Houston, it was the building of the downtown tunnel system. The tunnels are a mixed blessing. During Houston's long and humid summers as well as on rainy days, it is great for downtown workers to be able to go underground for lunch and shopping errands. The downside, however, is that the tunnels are not open after hours and on weekends and virtually every entry point is through one of the office towers rather than direct street access. I think the CBD would have been more vibrant without the tunnel system, as retail would have been located at street level rather than hidden underground, and such visibility and accessibility might have resulted in many business owners experimenting with remaining open on nights and weekends. As it is now, so many of Houston office towers only feature elegant but dark and empty lobbies at street level: https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...765124471,,0,0? I see this relative paucity of accessible retail and entertainment at street level as a big contributor to DT Houston's 9 - 5 culture.

For my current hometown Philly, it was the building of the Vine Street Expressway (I-676) connecting the Schuylkill Expressway with I-95, the Ben Franklin Bridge abound the Jersey suburbs. It's not that the connector was unnecessary - it's how it was built. Rather than tunneling, blocks of healthy and occupied residential stock was razed. Not only were those folks displaced, Center City's neighborhoods are now separated from those further north by a concrete barrier: https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...552730826,,0,0 The only good news is that a planned viaduct down South Street similar to the Vine Street Expressway was scuttled. Instead of being boxed in to the south as well, Center City spills seamlessly into Queen Village, Bella Vista, a Graduate Hospital on on further into South Philly. A dodge bullet indeed.
Running I-95 along the riverfront has to be in 2nd place then (arguably, 1st place); both disasters none the less. Although there is movement for reconnecting the cut-off city from the riverfront. I believe the plan is to bury I-95 or reroute it into the Vine Expressway somehow. Many cities made these interstate highway mistakes back in the '50s-'70s.
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Old 08-01-2014, 11:54 AM
 
4,649 posts, read 3,612,991 times
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Originally Posted by Road_Warrior View Post
Wilmington, DE's governor left national guard downtown armed for a year after the riots. Not good for business, killed the downtown.


Looks like the rioters didn't help business in downtown Wilmington either. Many cities, as we all know, had destructive race riots in the '60s with resulting decline. I think Wilmington has a lot of potential; its downtown is compact and easy, located on the 95 corridor with excellent transit options (Amtrak, including Acela and SEPTA).

I hope Wilmington takes-off soon but I've heard the local politics, especially the racial politics, is a problem.
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Old 08-01-2014, 12:39 PM
JJG JJG started this thread
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,247 posts, read 19,176,091 times
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Originally Posted by The_General View Post
Boston's urban renewal projects of the 60's. It's either the destruction of the Westend or the destruction of Scollay Square to put up Boston's "beautiful" new city hall.
The exact same thing happened to our "beautiful" new 1970's city hall.
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Old 08-01-2014, 12:59 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,132 posts, read 9,903,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Not trying to complain, but if you don't have your location listed, could you mention the city you live in? At least one comment caught my interest but I was unable to discern what city was being spoken of... (mostly in reference to the stadium comment.) Denver's stadiums are right Downtown and it is AWESOME.

In Denver, I would say the biggest mistake made by city government/building owners in the downtown area was the destruction of many historic buildings and landmarks in the sixties... Such as the Cosmopolitan Hotel. Luckily, they didn't go too crazy and left some good brick bones for the resurgence they are seeing today.

I also wish downtown had a subway or sky-walk system.
Regarding large stadiums, I think each individual case and how each city handles it is different. If the stadium has vast parking lots that put a hole in the middle of Downtown - then it might not be so good. If however, the stadium is built on the edge of downtown and it attracts people to downtown restaurants and shops then it might work out well. You seem to like Denver stadiums so I will take your word on it.

Agreed. Skywalks would great in just about any city.
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Old 08-01-2014, 01:06 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,132 posts, read 9,903,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
A good example of that would be the current Madison Square Garden. Although beloved by most of the world and having the prestige it has, it still replaced this:
Yeah that was a shock to New York back then. Its ashame because Madison Square Garden could have built somewhere else in Manhattan because despite the name, it is no longer anywhere near Madison Square.

There was a silver lining to the destruction of Pennsylvania Station. It started a effort to save many other buildings and today New York City has landmarked over thirty thousand buildings! So the destruction of that one beautiful building has helped save many many others.
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