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Old 08-01-2014, 01:57 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,947,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Regarding large stadiums, I think each individual case and how each city handles it is different. If the stadium has vast parking lots that put a hole in the middle of Downtown - then it might not be so good. If however, the stadium is built on the edge of downtown and it attracts people to downtown restaurants and shops then it might work out well. You seem to like Denver stadiums so I will take your word on it.

Agreed. Skywalks would great in just about any city.
That is exactly how Denver did it, they put the stadiums on the fringe of downtown near the interstate, they definitely add more to downtown than they take away in space.
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,872 posts, read 7,827,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamms View Post
Running I-95 along the riverfront has to be in 2nd place then (arguably, 1st place); both disasters none the less. Although there is movement for reconnecting the cut-off city from the riverfront. I believe the plan is to bury I-95 or reroute it into the Vine Expressway somehow. Many cities made these interstate highway mistakes back in the '50s-'70s.
Duh I agree that putting 95 between the city and the river may qualify as the biggest mistake. The Delaware is a beautiful waterfront and located as it is next to touristy Old City, it could have easily have been a focal point for living, dining and playing. Imagine something along the lines of Baltimore's Inner Harbor where barren Penn's Landing is now. Instead, only the most intrepid make their way there - not because it is dangerous but because it is a long trek across uninviting and uninteresting concrete walkways. The Race Street pier is a nice project that shows us what the riverfront could be, but I don't see the resources being made available to give Philly it's own "Big Dig" any time soon:


(my pic)

As understand it, the interstates around Philly were some of the first built. While that may have been a great coup at the time, if the planners had had the advantage of more experience, it is easy to see how the local interstates could have been better routed and designed. A small blessing is that I-76 was routed on the west side of the Schuylkill (though that is not without its flaws as well). At least that gives Center City residents access to the "other" river. And the Schuylkill Banks seem to get better all the time: https://www.schuylkillbanks.org.
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Duh I agree that putting 95 between the city and the river may qualify as the biggest mistake. The Delaware is a beautiful waterfront and located as it is next to touristy Old City, it could have easily have been a focal point for living, dining and playing. Imagine something along the lines of Baltimore's Inner Harbor where barren Penn's Landing is now. Instead, only the most intrepid make their way there - not because it is dangerous but because it is a long trek across uninviting and uninteresting concrete walkways. The Race Street pier is a nice project that shows us what the riverfront could be, but I don't see the resources being made available to give Philly it's own "Big Dig" any time soon:


(my pic)

As understand it, the interstates around Philly were some of the first built. While that may have been a great coup at the time, if the planners had had the advantage of more experience, it is easy to see how the local interstates could have been better routed and designed. A small blessing is that I-76 was routed on the west side of the Schuylkill (though that is not without its flaws as well). At least that gives Center City residents access to the "other" river. And the Schuylkill River Banks seem to get better all the time.
Much smaller place, but you should take a look at what St. Joseph, MO has done with their riverfront. Seems like it isn't too rare for cities to put interstates between themselves and an asset....

Picture.
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,901,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Not trying to complain, but if you don't have your location listed, could you mention the city you live in? At least one comment caught my interest but I was unable to discern what city was being spoken of... (mostly in reference to the stadium comment.) Denver's stadiums are right Downtown and it is AWESOME.

In Denver, I would say the biggest mistake made by city government/building owners in the downtown area was the destruction of many historic buildings and landmarks in the sixties... Such as the Cosmopolitan Hotel. Luckily, they didn't go too crazy and left some good brick bones for the resurgence they are seeing today.

I also wish downtown had a subway or sky-walk system.
Yep, that was bad. Basically a nuclear bomb right to the heart of the historic district, and I agree with the Cosmopolitan Hotel too. Denver tore down most of the old great hotels. Then when they are all gone, they convert the train station into a hotel. Denver's historical preservation makes no sense.

Denver Skyline Urban Renewal Project Disaster.
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
Yep, that was bad. Basically a nuclear bomb right to the heart of the historic district, and I agree with the Cosmopolitan Hotel too. Denver tore down most of the old great hotels. Then when they are all gone, they convert the train station into a hotel. Denver's historical preservation makes no sense.

Denver Skyline Urban Renewal Project Disaster.
I agree completely.

Heck, I would have rather seen the buildings gutted and used as parking facilities with the exterior of the building still intact or something. Truthfully, they should have just left the buildings alone though, they would be full of boutiques, apartments, etc... today if they had just left them alone. Those parking lots could have been a neighborhood...
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,425 posts, read 17,005,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
In 2009, our city removed a car lane and created two bike lanes at a cost of $60k.
less than 2 years later the city council voted to reserve the decision and put the car lane back and remove the bike lane for a cost of $300,000.
this is how political bickering results in wasteful government spending.
Was you mayor drunk or high when he made that decision?
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Was you mayor drunk or high when he made that decision?
It isn't nice to make fun of public figures for their... crack....addiction....





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Old 08-01-2014, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,872 posts, read 7,827,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Much smaller place, but you should take a look at what St. Joseph, MO has done with their riverfront. Seems like it isn't too rare for cities to put interstates between themselves and an asset....

Picture.
Yep. As the heavy manufacturing era wound down from the 50s through the 70s, cities saw their abandoned industrial riverfronts as eyesores rather than resources. This was also the time potloads of federal dollars were available to build our nation's highway infrastructure, enabling a perfect solution - let's put our ugly riverfronts out of sight on the other side of the road. Decades later, we find cities with riverfront access have a certain charm. Whodda thunk? All that concrete we poured back then is hard to work around today, however.
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Old 08-01-2014, 03:10 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,947,705 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Yep. As the heavy manufacturing era wound down from the 50s through the 70s, cities saw their abandoned industrial riverfronts as eyesores rather than resources. This was also the time potloads of federal dollars were available to build our nation's highway infrastructure, enabling a perfect solution - let's put our ugly riverfronts out of sight on the other side of the road. Decades later, we find cities with riverfront access have a certain charm. Whodda thunk? All that concrete we poured back then is hard to work around today, however.
Yup, it is a sad story. (And unforunately it is a common one, people sure like to take the "easy way out".)

They need to take examples from other cities that had industrial waterfronts and actually made something from them, such as Dubuque, IA.

Picture

Picture

Picture

Not too long ago, that area was decrepit, abandoned eyesores... and look at what the city has now since they didn't just wall themselves off from it... so sad other cities didn't do the same.
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Old 08-01-2014, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,425 posts, read 17,005,761 times
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Unbelievably, there was a time several decades ago when many of Savannah's squares were bisected by streets to facilitate "better" traffic flow. Fortunately, all but two of the original 24 squares have now been fully restored.

Squares of Savannah, Georgia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Without a doubt, the BEST thing that Savannah ever did -- like many cities -- was the restoration and revitalization of the riverfront, which prior to the mid-1970s was a dilapidated, dangerous, muddy eyesore.
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The DUMBEST decision your city's downtown area ever made.-image.jpg  
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