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Old 08-04-2014, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas via ATX
1,256 posts, read 1,481,198 times
Reputation: 1737

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This article discusses how lots of the fastest growing areas are in flyover country. Mentions OKC and Austin in particular. Also mentions El Paso, Little Rock, San Antonio and Columbus, OH as magnets for people seeking a better life.

Affordable housing draws middle class inland
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Old 08-04-2014, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
173 posts, read 197,719 times
Reputation: 134
Alot of these cities are in the South and unfortunately, you get what you pay for. I've grew up in Alabama and have lived a year in Louisiana and I'm heading straight for the west coast by next summer. It's too hot down here to go outside most of the year, high paying jobs are hard to come by unless you work in construction, and crime is a major issue. The housing costs down here are super cheap, but it's not worth it to me.
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Old 08-05-2014, 03:34 AM
 
3,326 posts, read 7,759,289 times
Reputation: 1973
Like the coasts, you still have to be selective as to what you choose.
There are plenty of fantastic places in the middle. The coastal areas have priced us out. Oh well. Earthquakes and hurricanes. Tornadoes and snow storms. Whichever.
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Old 08-05-2014, 06:29 AM
 
21,222 posts, read 30,452,593 times
Reputation: 19674
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjmcgrath View Post
Alot of these cities are in the South and unfortunately, you get what you pay for. I've grew up in Alabama and have lived a year in Louisiana and I'm heading straight for the west coast by next summer. It's too hot down here to go outside most of the year, high paying jobs are hard to come by unless you work in construction, and crime is a major issue. The housing costs down here are super cheap, but it's not worth it to me.
Ahhh yes, the west coast! City Data's answer to nirvana...
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Old 08-05-2014, 06:43 AM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,946,011 times
Reputation: 1858
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjmcgrath View Post
Alot of these cities are in the South and unfortunately, you get what you pay for. I've grew up in Alabama and have lived a year in Louisiana and I'm heading straight for the west coast by next summer. It's too hot down here to go outside most of the year, high paying jobs are hard to come by unless you work in construction, and crime is a major issue. The housing costs down here are super cheap, but it's not worth it to me.
Looking at the lists for "most affordable housing markets", the affordable areas seem to stretch north to south but consistently between the coasts. So not everyone has to deal with things like oppressive heat. Some of the most affordable markets are on the Great Lakes which temper heat in the summer.

Also, jobs vary pretty much everywhere, but somewhere like Minneapolis will pretty consistently have jobs, same with places like OKC, Louisville, and Milwaukee. As long as you stick to a larger market, you should be fine.
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Old 08-05-2014, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
173 posts, read 197,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
Looking at the lists for "most affordable housing markets", the affordable areas seem to stretch north to south but consistently between the coasts. So not everyone has to deal with things like oppressive heat. Some of the most affordable markets are on the Great Lakes which temper heat in the summer.

Also, jobs vary pretty much everywhere, but somewhere like Minneapolis will pretty consistently have jobs, same with places like OKC, Louisville, and Milwaukee. As long as you stick to a larger market, you should be fine.
I've considered moving to Milwaukee as well, but the "polar vortex" in the north/midwest this year kind of scared me away from there. Don't think I could go from living in the South all my life to -20 degrees, lol.
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Old 08-05-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,329,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjmcgrath View Post
I've considered moving to Milwaukee as well, but the "polar vortex" in the north/midwest this year kind of scared me away from there. Don't think I could go from living in the South all my life to -20 degrees, lol.
It's a pretty rare phenomenon, but it can certainly get cold, yes. Who knows what the climate will be like 10, 20, 30 or 50 years from now though.
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Old 08-05-2014, 08:56 AM
 
3,806 posts, read 5,206,828 times
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Just hope those moving from the coasts change their voting habits so they won't ruin their new homes too.
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Old 08-05-2014, 11:36 AM
 
3,147 posts, read 2,946,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjmcgrath View Post
I've considered moving to Milwaukee as well, but the "polar vortex" in the north/midwest this year kind of scared me away from there. Don't think I could go from living in the South all my life to -20 degrees, lol.
That was definitely a rare occurrence.

Sure the Midwest can be cold in the winter, but it really is NOT as bad as many people say... there is a lot of hyperbole on the subject. Also, if you are saving a ton on housing, you can vacation in the winter to the south/west/southeast....

Heck, you even have some nice skiing and such in the upper Midwest...
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Old 08-05-2014, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,405,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xander_Crews View Post
That was definitely a rare occurrence.

Sure the Midwest can be cold in the winter, but it really is NOT as bad as many people say... there is a lot of hyperbole on the subject. Also, if you are saving a ton on housing, you can vacation in the winter to the south/west/southeast....

Heck, you even have some nice skiing and such in the upper Midwest...
And if you live near Lake Michigan in Milwaukee (which would be the neighborhoods I'd most recommend), it's considerably warmer on a lot of those extreme days (not to mention cooler on the hot summer days).

Last winter was by far the worst of my lifetime. Hopefully it takes another lifetime to see the likes of it again!

That said, LA is a whole different weather animal than WI!
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