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Old 08-08-2014, 08:15 AM
 
Location: New Haven, CT
15 posts, read 16,126 times
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One of the things I've noticed when doing research for where to move for a good arts/music scene in the US is there seem to be a decent amount of locals in cities like Portland, OR or Austin, TX online expressing concern and discontent with new people moving to their cities. Ruining the feel, taking all the jobs, other things. Is this just something that happens in cities that are popular to move to right now? Are there any cities that have a thriving music scene and pop culture/arts that actually -want- people to move there?
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Old 08-08-2014, 08:50 AM
 
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My advice is to look for a city with an artsy community that doesn't have artsy as its primary identity.

Tell us about your prferences for climate, size, environment, etc. How many music venues, galleries, festivals, etc would you need to feel there is enough variety?

What knind of job would you be looking for?
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:03 AM
 
56,676 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
My advice is to look for a city with an artsy community that doesn't have artsy as its primary identity.

Tell us about your prferences for climate, size, environment, etc. How many music venues, galleries, festivals, etc would you need to feel there is enough variety?

What knind of job would you be looking for?
Good point, as those cities would be hungry for anyone to bring their talents and help build what is already there.
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:08 AM
 
Location: New Haven, CT
15 posts, read 16,126 times
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Thanks! I'm in web design currently but do painting/illustration on the side, which I'd prefer to do. I don't do much contemporary/abstract art, more lowbrow stuff. I've sold at anime/comic conventions before.
My husband has experience with restaurants/cooking (was a line cook for several years) but now he does social media/booking for music venues. He's also a musician and heavily into the music scene. We both love food.

As for climate I want to avoid several months of snow (we are in southern NE now). As for size, bigger than where we are now both population-wise and area-wise - 130k people here in 20 sq miles with mostly suburbs around us. But, nothing too huge. I've been to NYC many times and it's overwhelming. I like some nature within reasonable distance.

I have a friend in Louisville, KY who has been trying to get me to move there.
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,515,262 times
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Louisville sounds perfect, but for some other leftfield suggestions, you may enjoy the Paseo district in Oklahoma City or Fountain Square in Indianapolis.

Omaha might work too. It's not super snowy, but it does get rather cold.

Even though it's one of the snowiest cities in the country, as a sidenote, I'm planning a trip to Buffalo next weekend simply because it offers so much in terms of music and the arts.

Someone will inevitable suggest Cleveland. I will not steal his/her thunder.
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:43 AM
 
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Nashville is tipping over to the "too trendy" side but obviously has a huge music business - and restaurant scene.

Knoxville is much smaller but has a healthy music and restaurant scene. It is the HQ of AC entertainment - don't know if they are hiring.

Atlanta has a lot going on - but you knew that already.

Louisville has beautiful neighborhoods. having a friend there is a plus.
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Cleveland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Someone will inevitable suggest Cleveland. I will not steal his/her thunder.
Yep. I think that Cleveland is exactly what you're describing. It's got a great arts scene, both classical and modern, fantastic museums, theaters, orchestra, and art and music schools. Several neighborhoods are completely renovated into heavens for artsy type people, including Ohio City, Tremont, and Gordon Square, all of which are loaded with quaint coffee shops and bistros, art galleries, movie theaters, playhouses, etc. There are also some suburbs that have a long-established artsy flavor, such as Cleveland Heights and Lakewood. And there are some up-and coming artsy neighborhoods where you cans till find houses for a steal: St. Clair-Superior, North Collinwood, Kirtland/Chinatown.
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Old 08-08-2014, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,401,664 times
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For a while, there has been a fairly good music scene in Milwaukee (though it has died down considerably as of late), and people from CA, LA, TN, NY, and other states were moving in at a good clip. Not to mention the traditional northern and central IL folks who didn't want to go to Chicago. This generally happened when having a good time coming through with their bands, staying a few days, hosting Milwuakee bands in their region, etc. Because it's so under-the-radar to move to a place like Milwaukee, people seemed to get excited whenever someone moved up here. I'm sure it's the same for other places that aren't seen nationally as a place to move for the local culture, like Columbus or Chattanooga or even real oddballs like Carbondale or Las Cruces). Places like Brooklyn, Austin, San Fran and so on definitely hate on newbies.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:14 AM
 
56,676 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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Perhaps Lexington KY may work due to the presence of The University of Kentucky and it fits the size criteria, while still being close to your friend Louisville.

Columbia SC, Winston-Salem or Greensboro NC and maybe even cities like Birmingham and Huntsville in AL could be worth a look.
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Old 08-08-2014, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,831,191 times
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Stick with the small college cities. The ones you don't ever see pop up on these forums. Those will be the affordable, edgy cities the true artists will be living in.
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