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Old 08-14-2014, 10:53 AM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,249 posts, read 19,212,131 times
Reputation: 7010

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..."snowbelt"?

You mean "Rustbelt".

And I think you're confusing "bigger and easier" for "newer"...
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Old 08-14-2014, 11:02 AM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,206,435 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Uh ... NO! I run my heat in winter in Savannah, for good reason. Temps in the 20s and 30s demand HEAT!

Homeless people have been known to FREEZE to death in Savannah in winter.

Also, bananas plants may grow BUT DO NOT MAKE FRUIT in Savannah. Where did you get THAT from?! Even citrus is VERY HARD to grow this far north.

You really have no idea what you're talking about.
Yes, temps in the 20s and 30s do indeed require heat, but when they last only for a handful of hours during the wee hours of the day before rising right up to the 60s, even 70s, under the low-latitude subtropical sun, and are very uncommon in the first place, like it is in Savannah, and other Coastal South locations, then no heat is required during winter. Places in East Asia like Shanghai have such temps, and to greater frequency than Savannah, and they don't use heat.

A banana plantation, like the one I put forth in the picture, is precisely the type of facility that signifies commercial banana production (or at least the potential), and if bananas didn't fruit in Savannah, then they wouldn't exist just outside city limits. Ergo, bananas do make fruit in Savannah. In fact, it is better to produce bananas in subtropical locations like Savannah, and the rest of the Coastal South, than it is to produce bananas in the true tropics, as the subtropics will have winters that are mild but cool enough to suppress insect and fungi pest activity, unlike the true tropics. Savannah is not too far north to grow citrus; people grow citrus in the Coastal Carolinas, which are further north than Savannah. Japan, and other East Asian countries are around the same latitude as Savannah, and have colder winters too, and they grow citrus. If Japan can do it, then Savannah can too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
Someone's never been to Honolulu (which is cooler than the South in the summer and warmer in the winter) or Coastal California. No one who had traveled much would argue that the South has then best weather in the country. You could make an argument that it's not the worst.
I've been to Honolulu and various locations in Coastal California before, and experienced the elements they had to offer, and yet I still think that the South, especially the coastal portion, has the best weather in the country. How sophomoric of you to list those same-old, clichéd candidates for the honor of "the best weather", as well as to assume that I haven't traveled just because I didn't think those places had "the best weather."

Yes, I appreciate the fact that Honolulu, and Coastal California have warm, moderated climates with lots of sunshine, and they are great climates. But you know what? The South, especially the coastal portion, has those qualities too, as well another important quality the other two locales are sorely lacking in--rain, and lots of it. In the South, during the summer, I can watch small fluffy clouds in the blue sky build up into towering cumulonimbuses, which then unleash their full power in the form of epic downpours, with spectacular lightning shows that light up the sky, and are followed by the intense crack of thunder. And such thunderstorms are spectacular, dramatic, awesome, and yet safe; these are the warm air-mass thunderstorms just like what you get in the tropics, not to be confused with the violent, tornadic super-cells of the Great Plains. Such awesome, tropical-style storms, and rain in general, is sorely lacking in Coastal California and in rain-shadowed Honolulu. The South has a warm, stable, subtropical atmosphere, with the awesome combination of tropical-style summers with lots of sunshine AND lots of rain, as well as dry, Mediterranean-style sunny winters. That makes it the best climate in the country in my book.

This is all ignoring the fact that many locations in the South have cooler summer weather than Honolulu.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
The reason a lot of people in China and India don't have modern amenities like air-conditioning, heat, or running water has nothing to do with climate and everything to do with the fact that they are poor people living in third-world countries. The median family in China in 2012 made about $2100 for the year, India is even lower. People with more middle class incomes that can afford A/C and heat for the most part do have it, it's is just that that is a small percentage of the population. Humans can survive lots of different climates on earth from the Arctic to tropical rain-forests. But most people with adequate income in modern societies would prefer to keep their home somewhere between 60 and 80 degrees.
It doesn't change the fact that you can still live in the South (especially the coastal portions) without AC, or heat, if people in countries with similar climates, such as India and China, can do it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Yeah, I was like, what?? How could the South have the best weather in the country? Hot, humid summers and cold winters in like 90% of the South, plus tons of thunderstorms, tornado alley, and hurricanes.

Hawaii and Coastal California have no need for heat or A/C. They have great weather, year-round.
Hawaii has heat and humidity too (especially the windward portion), and the heat and humidity lasts year round. At least the South, especially the coastal portions, gets a break with the mild, Mediterranean-style winters.

Thunderstorms are fun, spectacular, dramatic, and yet harmless in the South. The Tornado Alley in the in the Great Plains, which is the Midwest, not the South; tornadoes don't really happen in much of the South, except in the Dixie Alley, an area of the Mid-South that is well inland. Hurricanes are one of the safer natural disasters; you have days to prep up, evacuate, and fortify your home before the storm hits, and even then, it is only a threat to low lying coastal areas due to storm surge. If your house is fortified, and set up, you can chill out, and have a hurricane party. California's weather is perfect alright...perfect for making wildfires that cause immense destruction. And Hawaii gets hurricanes too.

The South, especially coastal regions, has no need for A/C or heat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
It doesn't snow in much of California, but it sure does in most of the South!
You have to be well inland, and/or high upon the mountains in order to see snow in the South. In the coastal portions of the South, snow is practically unheard of, just like in California.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I dint compare NOLA and Houston which based on my experience are considerably warmer and more humid etc.

I compared some notable NE and SE cities

which are a little htter in the summer and less cold in the winter not sure why you are flying off on me and yes the lower elevation coastal south is hotter
The SE cities you picked (Atlanta, and Charlotte) are both located in the Piedmont region, a high-elevation region of the South. Therefore, is is expected that their winters will be sufficiently chilly enough to be "not much of a difference" compared to locations up North. Keep that in mind before making such a claim.

Last edited by Yn0hTnA; 08-14-2014 at 11:31 AM..
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Old 08-14-2014, 11:19 AM
 
Location: N. Glendale, AZ
23 posts, read 47,120 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by thetruth33 View Post
I decided to get the actual numbers to prove my point.

Population growth rate since 1970:
New York- 7.75%
New Jersey- 24.15%
Connecticut- 18.61%
Florida- 187.99%
Georgia- 117.71%
Tennessee- 65.56%

Population growth rate since 2000:
New York- 3.55%
New Jersey- 5.76%
Connecticut- 5.59%
Florida- 22.34%
Georgia- 22.06%
Tennessee- 14.18%
Percents lie, I never pay attention to percents when it comes to population growth. For example:

Gilbert, AZ. Named one of the fastest growing cities in the US
From 1990 to 2000 it grew by 275%, or 80,509 people.
NYC grew 9% in the same period, or 685,724 people.

I don't know why people always use percent growths to measure how fast a place is growing, its naturally going to decrease over time.
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Old 08-14-2014, 01:03 PM
 
8,763 posts, read 10,877,322 times
Reputation: 12814
Easier to live in a warm climate than cold. Not always pleasant, perfect weather in warmer climates, but definitely easier.
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Old 08-14-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,510,992 times
Reputation: 2928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanny Goat View Post
Easier to live in a warm climate than cold. Not always pleasant, perfect weather in warmer climates, but definitely easier.
Yes and No... I enjoy the cooler climate personally. I'd rather go outside and have it be 40F than to go outside and have it be 95F.

I can add all the clothes that I need to to keep warm... you can only take so many clothes off to feel cooler lol.

For what it's worth though... I've gone to school in 45F with shorts on :-)
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Old 08-14-2014, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,408,875 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanny Goat View Post
Easier to live in a warm climate than cold. Not always pleasant, perfect weather in warmer climates, but definitely easier.
Not for me! Snow never slows me down, but 90+ degrees and humidity drives me inside tout suite.
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Old 08-14-2014, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,760,271 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanny Goat View Post
Easier to live in a warm climate than cold. Not always pleasant, perfect weather in warmer climates, but definitely easier.
That's subjective. It's the other way around for me. I grew up in a hot, humid climate and moved North to escape it. I function much better in cold weather than hot. I have more energy in the winter and tend to be more productive as a result. My only gripe is driving in snowy/icy conditions, but other than that... A cold climate is MUCH easier to live in than a hot one.
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Old 08-14-2014, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,159,071 times
Reputation: 7075
People say that they prefer living in a warm climate, but what do they do when they're there? AC. In the car. At work. At home. Everywhere, they're using the AC. If they truly enjoyed the hot weather that much, then why are they making efforts to mitigate the heat by using AC all the time!? "I love the heat so much that I am not going to turn on the AC," said no one....ever.
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Old 08-14-2014, 03:14 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,175,961 times
Reputation: 4350
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
Yes and No... I enjoy the cooler climate personally. I'd rather go outside and have it be 40F than to go outside and have it be 95F.

I can add all the clothes that I need to to keep warm... you can only take so many clothes off to feel cooler lol.

For what it's worth though... I've gone to school in 45F with shorts on :-)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Not for me! Snow never slows me down, but 90+ degrees and humidity drives me inside tout suite.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
That's subjective. It's the other way around for me. I grew up in a hot, humid climate and moved North to escape it. I function much better in cold weather than hot. I have more energy in the winter and tend to be more productive as a result. My only gripe is driving in snowy/icy conditions, but other than that... A cold climate is MUCH easier to live in than a hot one.
It was clear that he was referring to the fact that warm climates don't have to deal with blizzards and such. Warm climates aren't as much of a strain. The heat may not be pleasant, but with plenty of water and sunscreen it isn't dangerous either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
People say that they prefer living in a warm climate, but what do they do when they're there? AC. In the car. At work. At home. Everywhere, they're using the AC. If they truly enjoyed the hot weather that much, then why are they making efforts to mitigate the heat by using AC all the time!? "I love the heat so much that I am not going to turn on the AC," said no one....ever.
AC was necessary for the industrialization of the south. That doesn't mean they can't tolerate the heat. Don't forget that people did live here before it was ever invented. And you still have southerners living without it.

Besides, it's not as if northerners are sitting around enjoying 25 degree weather with no form of heating. So talk to me when Texans and Floridians start flocking towards the north for the "better weather".
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Old 08-14-2014, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,510,992 times
Reputation: 2928
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Besides, it's not as if northerners are sitting around enjoying 25 degree weather with no form of heating. So talk to me when Texans and Floridians start flocking towards the north for the "better weather".
Pros and cons. Without heating pipes would freeze, stuff would get damaged and stop working and we would quite literally freeze.
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