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Old 08-14-2014, 06:07 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,258,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
I'm from Southeast Texas. I think I can count on maybe one hand the total number of winter days per year we had to run the heat for an entire 24 hours. For most of the south, about half of the winter season is California weather.
LOL, no.

If you're on the Mexico border, near the Gulf, your weather is nothing like California weather. In fact, your weather is nothing like Southern weather.

In New Orleans, which is MUCH warmer than the South as a whole, we still have ice storms and below zero temps. In the summer we have thunderstorms all the time in late-afternoon, tropical style. Many summer days there is no sunshine; just a thick haze.

Go a few hours north, somewhere like Nashville, and the difference with Northern cities is slight. Winters are only a tiny bit warmer.

And California weather is basically polar opposite of Southern weather. No humidity, summers, not winters, are the driest season, and tiny differences in seasonal temp.
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Old 08-14-2014, 06:09 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,258,712 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
No overexposure to the sun causes skin damage, and this is only really a problem for white people anyway. Most humid days are atleast partly cloudy, so the average person isn't being exposed to a excessive amount of sunlight.

What else you got...
Wait, what? LOL.

Everyone gets sun damage. I'm guessing you're white, because no non-white would think such a crazy thing, as if blacks are somehow impervious to UV radiation. Blacks can burn too, obviously. Blacks, even dark skinned, from West African nations, get sun damage.
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Old 08-14-2014, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,754,146 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Wait, what? LOL.

Everyone gets sun damage. I'm guessing you're white, because no non-white would think such a crazy thing, as if blacks are somehow impervious to UV radiation. Blacks can burn too, obviously. Blacks, even dark skinned, from West African nations, get sun damage.
My thoughts exactly. UV radiation is just that... radiation. Doesn't matter what your skin color is. Radiation is harmful to any living creature, if exposed too long. And humidity actually has a slight magnifying effect with the sun's rays, making it easier to burn if humidity levels are high. You can even get a sunburn on a cloudy day. It's happened to me before. I know that I burned quicker when I lived in Houston than I did when I lived in Vegas. However, dry heat does tend to rob more moisture from people's skin.
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Old 08-14-2014, 06:48 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,163,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
Yes, it damages your skin AND causes advanced aging!

Health Effects of UV Radiation | SunWise | US EPA
Did you read your own source? It says chronic sun exposure, which is not a major issue in humid climates. We're not talking about Phoenix or El Paso.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
LOL, no.

If you're on the Mexico border, near the Gulf, your weather is nothing like California weather. In fact, your weather is nothing like Southern weather.

In New Orleans, which is MUCH warmer than the South as a whole, we still have ice storms and below zero temps. In the summer we have thunderstorms all the time in late-afternoon, tropical style. Many summer days there is no sunshine; just a thick haze.

Go a few hours north, somewhere like Nashville, and the difference with Northern cities is slight. Winters are only a tiny bit warmer.

And California weather is basically polar opposite of Southern weather. No humidity, summers, not winters, are the driest season, and tiny differences in seasonal temp.
I said nothing of summer, spring or fall being comparable to California. Look at the weather averages for winter in a city like Houston. You'll see that most days have highs in the 60s and 70s. There is some significant rainfall, so I suppose you can throw the Pacific Northwest in there.

When did New Orleans record subzero temps?
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Wait, what? LOL.

Everyone gets sun damage. I'm guessing you're white, because no non-white would think such a crazy thing, as if blacks are somehow impervious to UV radiation. Blacks can burn too, obviously. Blacks, even dark skinned, from West African nations, get sun damage.
I never said non-whites don't get sun damage. I said it's not as big of an issue for us as it is for whites. The epidermeal melanin in darker skinned people has a higher SPF than whites have. This is fact.

All of this is moot anyways since that poster was simply trying to invalidate the fact that humidity is healthy for the skin. People down south are more likely to reap these benefits than they are likely to suffer from sun damage.
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:00 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,163,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
And humidity actually has a slight magnifying effect with the sun's rays, making it easier to burn if humidity levels are high.
Never heard that one before. Can we see a source?
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,504,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Did you read your own source? It says chronic sun exposure, which is not a major issue in humid climates. We're not talking about Phoenix or El Paso.
yeah, chronic. What do you think happens in the south... lack of sun? pfft.


Quote:
I never said non-whites don't get sun damage. I said it's not as big of an issue for us as it is for whites. The epidermeal melanin in darker skinned people has a higher SPF than whites have. This is fact.

All of this is moot anyways since that poster was simply trying to invalidate the fact that humidity is healthy for the skin. People down south are more likely to reap these benefits than they are likely to suffer from sun damage.
No you said and I quote "and this is only really a problem for white people anyway.". Those with darker skin are indeed affected less than those with lighter skin. The difference however isn't as much as you seem to think. Darker skinned people can and WILL burn.

The effects of the sun outweigh the benefits of a humid climate bar none.
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Old 08-14-2014, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,754,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Never heard that one before. Can we see a source?
My source is basic science. Water droplets magnify sunlight. It's not too hard to figure out. Besides, I did say "slight".
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Old 08-14-2014, 10:09 PM
 
145 posts, read 307,668 times
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Out of curiosity, how much of an aberration was the south east weather this year from years past? I lived there (don't want to reveal exactly where, but it was in the Carolinas-southern Virginia area) this past year for school and was shocked at how crazy the weather was. I expected to have mild winters, but the falls were chilly (at least by nightfall) and the winters were quite cold. The lows were regularly in mid 30s and I can remember plenty of days where it was either in the mid-20s or it "felt like" 28ish degrees. That's not even including the snow storm that put the whole place on lockdown. Aside from the snow, the cold wasn't that bad and I got used to it relatively quickly, to be fair.

I thought that I would get some relief in the spring, but that brought craziness of another sort. There were numerous "severe weather" alerts for thunderstorms, hail, and even tornado warnings. I can think of at least 4 separate tornado warnings that we got, which was insane having never been through those.

Is this type of weather normal in the south or was this year an especially bizarre year for weather throughout the country, as I know we experienced crazy weather patterns all over? I wouldn't have normally brought this up in this thread, btw, but since you all are discussing weather, I felt it might be appropriate to ask lol
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Old 08-14-2014, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,504,684 times
Reputation: 2927
Quote:
Originally Posted by west_2_east View Post
Out of curiosity, how much of an aberration was the south east weather this year from years past? I lived there (don't want to reveal exactly where, but it was in the Carolinas-southern Virginia area) this past year for school and was shocked at how crazy the weather was. I expected to have mild winters, but the falls were chilly (at least by nightfall) and the winters were quite cold. The lows were regularly in mid 30s and I can remember plenty of days where it was either in the mid-20s or it "felt like" 28ish degrees. That's not even including the snow storm that put the whole place on lockdown. Aside from the snow, the cold wasn't that bad and I got used to it relatively quickly, to be fair.

I thought that I would get some relief in the spring, but that brought craziness of another sort. There were numerous "severe weather" alerts for thunderstorms, hail, and even tornado warnings. I can think of at least 4 separate tornado warnings that we got, which was insane having never been through those.

Is this type of weather normal in the south or was this year an especially bizarre year for weather throughout the country, as I know we experienced crazy weather patterns all over? I wouldn't have normally brought this up in this thread, btw, but since you all are discussing weather, I felt it might be appropriate to ask lol
Weather can get extreme in the Carolinas in particular. Especially if you're higher up in the mountains.
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Old 08-14-2014, 11:13 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,163,750 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
My source is basic science. Water droplets magnify sunlight. It's not too hard to figure out. Besides, I did say "slight".
I wouldn't call it basic science since most people likely believe that humidity and clouds would shield them from direct UV exposure. Hell I was one of those people and I consider myself a pretty smart guy.

Regardless, I found the source for you.

Influence of heat, wind, and humidity o - PubMed Mobile
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