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Old 08-14-2014, 11:28 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,158,248 times
Reputation: 4349

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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
yeah, chronic. What do you think happens in the south... lack of sun? pfft.
Chronic essentially means excessive. Everyone down south is not dealing with excessive exposure to sun rays.

According to the CDC, the states with the worst rates of melanoma (skin cancer) also happen to be some of the cloudiest and furthest north. How you like them apples?

The worst states for melanoma | Fox News


Quote:
No you said and I quote "and this is only really a problem for white people anyway.". Those with darker skin are indeed affected less than those with lighter skin. The difference however isn't as much as you seem to think. Darker skinned people can and WILL burn.
So I didn't phrase it right the first time. You got me.

Quote:
The effects of the sun outweigh the benefits of a humid climate bar none.
This sounds like a statement of fact to me. Any proof?

Either way it seems to me that the simple solution is to wear sun screen and stay in shaded areas as much as possible. This way one is able to soak up all the benefits of humidity without risking chronic sun exposure. So despite all this needless splitting hairs, that brings us back to my original statement of the muggy air being good for you.
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Old 08-15-2014, 12:19 AM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,501,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Chronic essentially means excessive. Everyone down south is not dealing with excessive exposure to sun rays.

According to the CDC, the states with the worst rates of melanoma (skin cancer) also happen to be some of the cloudiest and furthest north. How you like them apples?

The worst states for melanoma | Fox News
Quote:
Since people in cloudy climates donít see the need to protect themselves from the sun often, they may be out of the habit of doing so on sunny days as well. Because these places are so cloudy, residents are more likely to be pale, and on a sunny day may suffer more extreme sunburns as a result. Tanned skin is still unhealthy skin and is a risk factor for melanoma, but a greater risk factor is the number of severe sunburns over a lifetime. What about Utah and Wyoming, though?
Your own link.
And really... Fox News? Come on man...

That link just says that people up north are more careless because of the overcast.
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Old 08-15-2014, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,751,049 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
I wouldn't call it basic science since most people likely believe that humidity and clouds would shield them from direct UV exposure. Hell I was one of those people and I consider myself a pretty smart guy.

Regardless, I found the source for you.

Influence of heat, wind, and humidity o - PubMed Mobile
I wasn't talking about UV, I was talking about sunlight. I did mention UV radiation in the first part of my original post, but what I said about humidity having a slight magnifying effect with the sun's rays wasn't in reference to UV. And yes, that was something I learned in 8th grade Earth Science.

Last edited by Bobloblawslawblog; 08-15-2014 at 12:59 AM..
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Old 08-15-2014, 07:50 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,158,248 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
Your own link.
And really... Fox News? Come on man...

That link just says that people up north are more careless because of the overcast.
The data doesn't come from Fox News. It comes from the CDC.

What the link proves is that southerners aren't suffering from severe skin damage more than anywhere else. So your earliest claim is baseless.
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,314,520 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
The data doesn't come from Fox News. It comes from the CDC.

What the link proves is that southerners aren't suffering from severe skin damage more than anywhere else. So your earliest claim is baseless.
They do suffer from skin damage, but not necessarily cancer or melanomas. Over-exposure to direct sunlight is bad, plain and simple. I noticed when I was in Aruba for my honeymoon that the locals (who are black) generally do not expose their skin to the sunlight there, and wear light sweaters, hats, or other coverings to keep their skin from the sun's harmful rays. The few people who didn't were black as charcoal, which although looks cool it can't be good for the skin. Sunscreen helps a lot with protection from burning and hence, melanomas/cancer, but it doesn't block the sun from damaging your skin 100%. If you get tan/darker you're damaging your skin, period.

As a pale-skinned fellow myself I would be a bit worried about living somewhere where the sunlight shone on me from such a high angle. Even in the Upper Midwest where I've lived most of my life (assuming we don't count St. Louis as the Upper Midwest) in June there are times when the angle of the sun is simply too strong for me to want to be outside for too long, no matter what the air temperature is. When I did live in St. Louis as a child and I played outside every day like most boys do (or did back then anyways) I was incredibly dark from overexposure to the sun. Today I have sun spots on the parts of my body (mainly the shoulders and my cheeks and nose) that have been the most exposed to the sun, especially when I have been burned, and now I am more careful about applying sunscreen or staying out of the sun altogether at times.

Moderation is key.
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,501,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
The data doesn't come from Fox News. It comes from the CDC.

What the link proves is that southerners aren't suffering from severe skin damage more than anywhere else. So your earliest claim is baseless.
You didn't read my response I take it. The link merely says

Quote:
"Since melanoma risk is increased with sun exposure, why do some of the cloudiest states have the highest melanoma rates? The answer may lie in behavior differences by location, though we can’t draw a direct cause and effect conclusion. Common advice is to apply sunscreen and wear protective gear when in the sun, but many people don’t follow this advice on cloudy days"

Also, sun exposure does not necessarily = skin cancer. Sun exposure can have many effects including wrinkles, advanced aging, cancer etc. There are more sunny days in the southern region vs the northern therefore there is more sun exposure. The more sun exposure the more DAMAGE to your skin and NOT necessarily skin cancer.

Northern states have far more overcast days and over time far far less sun exposure. Because northerners have far less sun exposure, they also have less vitamin D and far less melanin in their skin. Days that it actually does become sunny, people rarely wear sun screen and are affected by the sun much quicker. This is an issue of lack of education on the sun's effects rather than proof that southerners aren't suffering from severe skin damage (which btw I didn't state southerners were more likely to get skin cancer).

Last edited by wolf39us; 08-15-2014 at 08:22 AM..
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,119,247 times
Reputation: 7075
Unless you're in Florida, moving from the north to the South for weather reasons just doesn't make sense. You don't gain much. Actually, you trade amazing summers for a pit of sweat, humidity and misery for 3-4 months. And then all the leaves fall off just like up north, making everything look ugly and dead, and the temperature is only like 10 degrees warmer. Big f'n deal. In Nov 2013, my family and I were flying down to FL and had to switch flights in ATL and it was literally 32 degrees. No leaves on the trees. It just looked awful. I don't see the advantage. Not to mention, there are MANY days in the year in which it's warmer up north, believe it or not! That's when I realized I'd rather live in the north and have northern culture, even if winters are a little colder and snowier.
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:34 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,158,248 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
You didn't read my response I take it. The link merely says




Also, sun exposure does not necessarily = skin cancer. Sun exposure can have many effects including wrinkles, advanced aging, cancer etc. There are more sunny days in the southern region vs the northern therefore there is more sun exposure. The more sun exposure the more DAMAGE to your skin and NOT necessarily skin cancer.

Northern states have far more overcast days and over time far far less sun exposure. Because northerners have far less sun exposure, they also have less vitamin D and far less melanin in their skin. Days that it actually does become sunny, people rarely wear sun screen and are affected by the sun much quicker. This is an issue of lack of education on the sun's effects rather than proof that southerners aren't suffering from severe skin damage (which btw I didn't state southerners were more likely to get skin cancer).
Fair enough but again this is moot since this entire discussion came from you trying to invalidate the benefits of humidity. I notice you had no response for that.
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:38 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,158,248 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Unless you're in Florida, moving from the north to the South for weather reasons just doesn't make sense. You don't gain much. Actually, you trade amazing summers for a pit of sweat, humidity and misery for 3-4 months. And then all the leaves fall off just like up north, making everything look ugly and dead, and the temperature is only like 10 degrees warmer. Big f'n deal. In Nov 2013, my family and I were flying down to FL and had to switch flights in ATL and it was literally 32 degrees. No leaves on the trees. It just looked awful. I don't see the advantage. Not to mention, there are MANY days in the year in which it's warmer up north, believe it or not! That's when I realized I'd rather live in the north and have northern culture, even if winters are a little colder and snowier.
Atlanta is much more cool than the rest of the south. And people are voting with their feet. It's clear that many Americans prefer the south's weather to the north's and you simply can't stand that fact. I'm sure you'll pretend not to see this response, as you come off as someone who clearly does not like being corrected and would rather carry on spouting nonsense.
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Old 08-15-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,501,774 times
Reputation: 2927
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Fair enough but again this is moot since this entire discussion came from you trying to invalidate the benefits of humidity. I notice you had no response for that.
Didn't think I had to respond to that since it's known that skin benefits from more humidity indeed. But I believe that the effects of the sun counter these benefits. I'm not stating that as a matter of fact, but as a matter of conclusion drawn by the benefits of humidity vs effects of the sun.

The northern states on the east cost certainly have plenty of humidity though... We also have very few sunny days in comparison. I would say a conclusion could be drawn that northeasteners would benefit the most due to these facts.
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