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Old 08-15-2014, 03:44 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,196,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Unless you're in Florida, moving from the north to the South for weather reasons just doesn't make sense. You don't gain much. Actually, you trade amazing summers for a pit of sweat, humidity and misery for 3-4 months. And then all the leaves fall off just like up north, making everything look ugly and dead, and the temperature is only like 10 degrees warmer. Big f'n deal. In Nov 2013, my family and I were flying down to FL and had to switch flights in ATL and it was literally 32 degrees. No leaves on the trees. It just looked awful. I don't see the advantage. Not to mention, there are MANY days in the year in which it's warmer up north, believe it or not! That's when I realized I'd rather live in the north and have northern culture, even if winters are a little colder and snowier.
You commit the sweeping generalization fallacy. First things first, we need to make sure we differentiate between the different parts of the South before stating things like "everywhere in the region outside of Florida is not much different than the North".

Indeed, there is a portion of the South that could indeed rival any Northern city in terms of winter cold, and landscape. The portion includes areas that are well into the continent, such as the Mid-South region, and/or high in elevation, like the Appalachian Mountains, or the Piedmont. This part of the South can literally pass for the North during the cool season, as the areas are dominated by deciduous forests, that go bare in the winter, and the two areas receive quite a bit of snow every winter. However, even this cooler portion of the South contains some swaths of evergreen trees, and the snow and cold is not as severe as up North. Atlanta, being in the Piedmont region, is a city that is included in this cooler portion, and its probably what led you to claim that the South is not much different than the North. Other Southern cities in this region include Nashville, Asheville, Raleigh, Charlotte, Memphis, Dallas, Little Rock, and Birmingham.

The other portion of the South is much, much warmer than the North, to the point where a move down South would be a huge gain to someone looking to escape winter. This portion of the South includes the entire area in proximity to the Gulf/Atlantic Coast, as well as some inland areas that are quite warm, like the inland portions of the Southern half of Texas, as well as the inland areas of Florida. This portion of the South better fits the bill as a subtropical paradise than the other portion; winters are very mild, not too dissimilar to what you see in the Mediterranean, North Africa, and Northern India. This portion of the South stays green all year, and is dominated by subtropical evergreen forests, including the broad-leaf variety, also known as a laurel forest, made up of broad-leaf evergreens like Live Oaks, and Southern Magnolias, as the pine-variety, which includes pines like Slash Pine, and Long-Leaf Pine, and the swamps, made up of Cypress trees, which stay evergreen in warm climates. A wide variety of tropical/subtropical plants, like sugar cane, rice and cotton, can be cultivated in this part of the South. Even some tender crops like mangoes, bananas, guavas, and starfruit do well in the cities of this portion of the South, and do many varieties of palm trees. All these plants would die a horrible ugly death in the North, while they thrive in this part of the South. Winter precipitation of any kind is very rare in this part of the South, almost to the point of being unheard of. By the time cold-fronts reach this portion of the South, they are pretty much pulverized; all they do at that point is shift the wind, and dry out the air. The freezes that do occur will last only for a handful of hours, before the temps rise up to the 60s even 70s under the subtropical sun, and such freezes only occur a handful of times AT MOST; parts of this portion of the South is even frost-less. The warmest parts of this portion, including the tropical South Florida, as well as Central Florida and Coastal South Texas, are the only regions in the Continental US where Coconut Palms can grow tall, and in full health to the point that they fruit. Cities in this portion of the South include Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Houston, New Orleans, Mobile, Tampa, Miami, Savannah, and Charleston.

Cliff Notes version: There are two portions of the South; one portion includes the inland areas of the region, as well as high elevation regions, and the landscape and weather is not much different than the North. The other portion is much warmer with non-existent, and is subtropical paradise, containing evergreen forests, and is able to grow a plethora of tropical/subtropical plants.


And I will leave you some pictures to demarcate the differences between these two regions of the South. This picture is of Charlotte, NC during the winter, of the cooler portion of the South:

http://media.syracuse.com/news/photo...daef054e9a.jpg

As you can see, it is not much different than the North, a fact which is especially underscored by the snow. Snowfall is still rather uncommon even in this part of the South, though, but that only leaves the dead-looking vegetation, bare trees, and dead grass, exposed.

Now here is Brunswick, GA, of the warmer portion of the South, during winter:

http://vanishingsouthgeorgia.files.w...a-usa-2011.jpg

Such a landscape, with abundant subtropical/tropical vegetation, is typical of this warm portion of the South near the Gulf and South Atlantic Coasts, from South Texas east across the Gulf to Florida, and then up the South Atlantic coast to Southern Virginia. The landscape in this part of the South is alive and green year-round. You will never see these types of plants survive up North during winter.
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Old 08-15-2014, 03:51 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,154,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Sure you did.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
Where?
.......
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Old 08-15-2014, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,749,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SawBoi View Post
LOL. In about five months there will be posts on C-D from people saying that they're tired of the cold and are moving down south.
Doubtful. It's the other way around for more people than you might think. From what I can tell, the main reason so many people are moving South has more to do with a lower COL and more jobs, not weather/climate.

Of course there are always going to be those octogenarians with poor blood circulation who will freeze to death if it's any cooler than 95 degrees, so I'm sure there will always be a demand for more retirement communities down there.
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Old 08-15-2014, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI
10 posts, read 14,141 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
And I will leave you some pictures to demarcate the differences between these two regions of the South. This picture is of Charlotte, NC during the winter, of the cooler portion of the South:

http://media.syracuse.com/news/photo...daef054e9a.jpg

As you can see, it is not much different than the North, a fact which is especially underscored by the snow. Snowfall is still rather uncommon even in this part of the South, though, but that only leaves the dead-looking vegetation, bare trees, and dead grass, exposed.
There are, however, different levels of "winter" depending on where in the "north" you're talking about. Here's my city, Madison, WI, in winter:

http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/6...ison%20020.jpg

Note in the picture of Charlotte that there is actually very sparse snow on the grass, whereas in Madison, there is slush in the road and piles of plowed snow on the sidewalks.

I like to say that here in the upper midwest, there are actually two winters: There's the "regular" winter, with cool/cold temperatures and some snow, which actually occurs in the late fall and early spring. "Deep" winter, however, has very cold temps (went down to ~ 25 below zero last winter), frequent snowfall, and snow and ice that stick around from early winter through mid-March.
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Old 08-18-2014, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,093 posts, read 13,474,670 times
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From what I'm looking at regarding domestic migration trends in metros, the Northern cities are improving migration from the North AND South, while the South has a declining rate of Northern migration. This would imply that the North is both keeping more of its residents and also attracting more from the South.
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Old 08-18-2014, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,667 posts, read 33,667,394 times
Reputation: 51854
Income is commensurate with cost of living so the average worker doesn't benefit that much from moving south unless they don't have to live where they work.

Retirees on a pension make out from moving south especially if they sell that big house up north. Less snow is a bonus when you are old. You don't have to shovel it and you don't have to walk in it, two things that older persons with mobility issues consider. Retirees don't have school aged kids so the locals' taxes won't go up that much if they move there. They tend not to commit crimes, either. Point is, the baby boomers are reaching retirement age and they are a big demographic. Expect the south to continue to grow.

Now, if they only remember why they fled their high tax northern blue states on election day.
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Old 08-18-2014, 12:49 PM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,361,018 times
Reputation: 10914
It wasn't until Facebook that I really realized what people go through during the summer in places like the deep south or Phoenix.

Up here it's just December to March that people will whine about any large snowstorms we might get or cold snaps that come through during the winter.

I never thought anything about summers just because I was focusing on what's in front of me - great weather in the upper Midwest.

Now I see Facebook posts all day long of certain people I've met who are from or moved to places like Phoenix and Florida and I laugh because it's the exact same idea, just switched 6 months. Instead of people taking picture of their car themometer when it's like 10 degrees out, they're all in the 100's and it's posts of people screaming and complaining about the "oven" and baking and blah blah when will it finally be September.

I don't really care about weather that much as long as it's not too hot out (I can't do any sort of heat), and I realize that it's all personal opinion and people will whine up north and down south about it all the time in different seasons. For most people it isn't a big deal at the end of the day.
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Old 08-18-2014, 03:48 PM
 
736 posts, read 478,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
100% your opinion.

January through May? Seriously. Try December through March, which are often cold and barren looking in much of the South too. This past February we spent a night in Marietta, Georgia on the way to visit family in Florida and woke up to 23 degrees. The trees were bare, the grass was brown...just like at home. The only part of the South that stays nice and remotely green year round is the extreme southern tier, and those places are abnormally miserable in the summertime. Sweaty, humid summers that seem to go on forever where the heat index on a 90 degree day will often be well into the low 100s is not paradise to a lot of people.

Some of us actually enjoy snow. I just got home from an outdoor arts festival here in Michigan, temp 85 degrees, pretty humid, and the sun beating down. I happened to see a painting of a snowy country barn scene and I thought, "Yep, that's why I love it here so much. Because we get such a variation in weather, never a dull moment." I could never live somewhere that didn't have at least some snow. It's pretty!

We don't live in a tiny home with a tiny yard at all. Prices where I live are at least as reasonable as most parts of the South. We have a seven year old house with 2,000 square feet, a three car garage, crown molding and intricate woodwork throughout, a fireplace, and granite countertops, all for around $200,000. Not too bad, right?

And more population growth is a good thing to you? Yikes! That is one of the main reasons why I couldn't live somewhere like Atlanta or Florida for anything. Right now my commute to work is roughly twenty miles, almost all expressway, and it takes me about 25 minutes. If I lived in the suburbs north of Atlanta, I would probably be looking at minimum of an hour, probably longer. Orlando is just about as bad. Sorry, but part of having a good quality of life for me is having more of my time to use as I see fit. Sitting in a car when I could be relaxing at home with my family is not my idea of quality of life.

See, I have nothing against the South. We actually own a condo in coastal South Carolina where we spend a couple of weeks a year and rent out to vacationers the rest of the year. The South does have many nice places and things to see. However, just because someone chooses not to live there does not mean that there is something wrong with them or that they are stupid or crazy. It means that they prefer something else.
I agree with you completely on this.. To add to this.. Many areas in the South in the wintertime are prone to winter weather unless its right on the gulf coast or deep into Florida. And unlike more north, they will shut down at the thought of a snowflake falling. Also, Many areas in the south are MORE prone to freezing rain (or ice) in winter than many Northern States are. That may sound crazy but I know for a fact that ice storms are far more common in Tennessee and Arkansas and Oklahoma compared to areas like Michigan.

Here is another fact that this green areas year around usually have a threat of. It has been quiet lately but many of those areas are very prone to strong hurricanes making landfall. I think I'll deal with a little winter compared to that risk..
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Old 08-21-2014, 02:07 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,196,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbtornado View Post
I agree with you completely on this.. To add to this.. Many areas in the South in the wintertime are prone to winter weather unless its right on the gulf coast or deep into Florida. And unlike more north, they will shut down at the thought of a snowflake falling. Also, Many areas in the south are MORE prone to freezing rain (or ice) in winter than many Northern States are. That may sound crazy but I know for a fact that ice storms are far more common in Tennessee and Arkansas and Oklahoma compared to areas like Michigan.
Nonsense. Do you have any sources and links that show Tennessee, Arkansas, and Oklahoma as being more prone to freezing rain than Michigan is?

Anyways, as stated before, the only areas of the South that any semblance of a winter are the far inland, and/or mountainous areas of the region, which certainly describes much of Tennessee, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. And even then, winters aren't as severe as up North, with winter precipitation being more infrequent. With such infrequency, there is not much need to invest in snow equipment, so those Southern cities thus shut down when it snows.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbtornado View Post
Here is another fact that this green areas year around usually have a threat of. It has been quiet lately but many of those areas are very prone to strong hurricanes making landfall. I think I'll deal with a little winter compared to that risk..
Lets not forget that Hurricanes also strike the North, as we've seen recently with the two consecutive strikes on NYC.

Anyways, hurricanes are among the safest of natural disasters; you have lots of days in advance to prepare, fortify your home, evacuate, etc to be safe from the storm, unlike other disasters that come without warning. Hurricanes are really only a threat to low lying, coastal areas, due to storm surge, but over land, with more elevation, they weaken fast, and become nothing but big rainstorms.
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Old 07-20-2015, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
It was clear that he was referring to the fact that warm climates don't have to deal with blizzards and such. Warm climates aren't as much of a strain. The heat may not be pleasant, but with plenty of water and sunscreen it isn't dangerous either.



AC was necessary for the industrialization of the south. That doesn't mean they can't tolerate the heat. Don't forget that people did live here before it was ever invented. And you still have southerners living without it.

Besides, it's not as if northerners are sitting around enjoying 25 degree weather with no form of heating. So talk to me when Texans and Floridians start flocking towards the north for the "better weather".
I know it's been almost a year since you post it, but just so you know, I'm a native Floridian, who moved to Texas, and is looking to move to Minnesota after college, and the 4 seasons and long winter is one of the many reasons, besides more liberal politics, being more gay tolerant and a better quality of life Plenty of southerners move up north, the main difference is we have less superficial reasons than most northerners. Northerners move south, enjoy the milder winters but then complain about everything else and try to make it like a mini version of New York and in doing so, annoy the native southerners. Many of Miami's native born population from before the 80s and 90s moved out to either other parts of Florida or Georgia, Tennessee or the Carolinas. Southerners that move up north have intentions that go beyond golfing in February, and they usually don't try to change everywhere up and annoy the locals.

Blizzards aren't so bad btw. We rarely get them in Texas, but we got them this year and ironically it was the one day school wasn't cancelled when the other days, a single inch closed it all up! I also like tornadoes and hail. They come with risks, sure. But nature sure is purdy!
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