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Old 07-22-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,746 posts, read 3,205,422 times
Reputation: 7190

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Right, but for some reason you omitted the gist/point of it:
My co-workers are wondering what I'm finding so hilarious as type this.

I didn't deliberately omit anything. That poster is perfectly entitled to feel what they feel. He/she would rather deal with the continuous cold of a Northern winter than the periodic ice storms of a Tennessee winter. That's totally okay. I'm not at all offended, cuz, like, different strokes and all that. My friend in California, for example, wouldn't want to deal with the weather in the Midwest OR the South. And that's okay, too. It's a big, big world.

I'm thankful there are lots of people who are very happy up north and who would never want to leave. I wouldn't want it any other way. Because I sure wouldn't want there to be a mass exodus from the North, nor would I want all those people to settle in, say, Tennessee. Nashville is growing quickly enough as it is, and traffic is already horrendous.
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
Pretty much describes the winter and summer climates in SE Michigan and Southern Ontario. I honestly don't find the summer humidity in TN to be much worse than it is in Detroit or Toronto.
It's demonstrably worse in TN if you actually look at weather records.
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Old 07-22-2015, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,318,361 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
It's demonstrably worse in TN if you actually look at weather records.
I need to seriously invest in these rose-colored glasses some people seem to own (not you)!
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Old 07-23-2015, 12:20 AM
 
1,820 posts, read 717,104 times
Reputation: 1822
Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
Hmm, interminable hot muggy summers and tepid brown & grey winters with little to no snow; no thank you, I'll stick with my "crappy northern weather."




(photos mine)
To me a snow covered landscape is one of the most beautiful sights in nature.
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Old 07-23-2015, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,540 posts, read 1,881,004 times
Reputation: 1574
Quote:
Originally Posted by stremba View Post
According to Wikipedia the elevation of Charlotte is 751 ft. That is hardly "high up in the mountains". An elevation of 751 ft would have little effect on climate. The inland location of Charlotte would be much more important in terms of climate than the 751 ft elevation.
Atlanta's average is about 1050 feet...
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Old 07-23-2015, 07:16 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,567,437 times
Reputation: 2194
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I said "almost as cold". The South is no subtropical paradise except way down into FL.

Have you ever been to Huntsville, AL in winter? It ain't warm, trust me. How bout Tupelo, MS. It's cold in winter. Same for Little Rock, AR and western SC, NC, etc. The South is barely subtropical and mostly qualifies because of summer. But the winters there stink: 65F one day, and then 30F the next. And they get low temp in the teens and single digits. Just look at the last two winters. And it looks just as barren as lifeless in winter as here. Except at least around here with our cooler season grasses, the grass is more green in winter than the brown hay you see on lawns and highway medians down there.
I cant speak for tupelo and huntsville but I am pretty sure the coastal panhandle in miss.,florida, and alabama rarely get below the 60s or 70s in winter in the day. If its possible I try leave the depressing mid atlantic winter winter for hilton head weekends and I golf and bicycle and walk all winter and it rarely gets below 40 and alot of days its above 60 or 70 ,even in january and december it is very rare to see it get really cold. It was in the 70s this january at new years and christmas when we were there and never seemed to get below 40 at night

My experience of the south are very mild winters thats why such a large number of people are moving to he south, no shoveling driveways and golf and bicycle and walk the most of the year. I hope to be one of these people soon

Last edited by floridanative10; 07-23-2015 at 07:33 PM..
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Old 07-23-2015, 07:26 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,567,437 times
Reputation: 2194
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
That's because you're trying to make it seem that way to justify your new locale. A summer in Southern Ontario is much different than a southern summer - not even close. Humidity, heat differential, and angle of the sun make it much more torturous.
This is ridiculous , the angle of the sun makes it much more torturous?

Milwaukee is rated as the most humid city in the country for afternoon humidity? I cant name one mid atlantic/northeastern city that doesnt have high humidity, at least in high humidity places like florida you can get to the ocean or a pool. DC and Baltimore are awful with all the people and the traffic, humidity and summer in general, just like winter, is all about how you spend it. I am fine with heat if I am near a pool or beach or lake , not in a DC traffic jam or a city like DC where the heat just sits
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Old 07-23-2015, 07:42 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,199,967 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbern100 View Post
I cant speak for tupelo and huntsville but I am pretty sure the coastal panhandle in miss.,florida, and alabama rarely get below the 60s or 70s in winter in the day. If its possible I try leave the depressing mid atlantic winter winter for hilton head weekends and I golf and bicycle and walk all winter and it rarely gets below 40 and alot of days its above 60 or 70 ,even in january and december it is very rare to see it get really cold. It was in the 70s this january at new years and christmas when we were there and never got below freezing at night

My experience of the south are very mild winters thats why such a large number of people are moving to he south, no shoveling driveways and golf and bicycle and walk the most of the year. I hope to be one of these people soon
The coastal South, from the Texas coast all the way to Florida, and up to southern Virginia, is mild enough during winter to sustain copious amounts of evergreen vegetation, from pine trees, to broad-leaf evergreens like live oaks, bay trees, magnolias etc. Winter temps range from highs in the 50s and lows in the 30s for northern parts to highs in the 70s and lows in the 50s for southern parts. Even in the rare instances the coastal South freezes during the year, temps, much of the time, warm up to nice levels relatively quickly afterwards, and the ground often still stays warm enough for plants to grow year-round.

Such warm winters are then followed by hot, humid summers, with frequent rainfall. Such a climate gives rise to all sorts of exotic environments, such as that pictured below, in many places in the coastal South region, from Texas to Florida, and north to south Virginia. No where else in the country has such an awesome climate that can produce such exotic landscapes

Hunting Island, SC:

http://traverse.us.com/wp-content/up...s-SP-SC-09.jpg
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Old 07-23-2015, 08:16 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,567,437 times
Reputation: 2194
I have had to adjust to gardening up north and its very different but we are still in the 7b region, its almost impossible to grow much color but its not that bad in winter. I am not always sure about the plant hardiness zones but overall these charts seem right. I love the maple up north on the appalachian trail, people need to check the trail out if you have never been.

While I agree about the weird and interesting plants and trees in the Coastal south , the southern appalachians are the oldest mountains in the world. One thing I love about hiking the inland south is some of the plants I saw on the appalachian trail like the catawba rhododendron and azaleas and the mountain laurel, you can find mountain laurel everywhere but the azaleas and catawba rhodendron only in certain states like tennessee and north carolina. I know asheville has one of the longest wildflower seasons in the whole country. Roan mountain in tennessee is a gorgeous place to visit

rhododendron and roan mountain tennessee







Brooke trout roan mountain





great web site for gardeners
USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map


Last edited by floridanative10; 07-23-2015 at 08:26 PM..
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Old 07-23-2015, 09:12 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,567,437 times
Reputation: 2194
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
It's demonstrably worse in TN if you actually look at weather records.
what is demonstrably worse, the brutal nashville tennessee winters and summers ? lol Nashville is a very nice climate

Average high in F: 47-86 degrees jan thru june

Jan- 47 degrees
Feb-52 degrees
March- 61 degrees
April -71 degrees
May-78 degrees
June-86 degrees

Average low in F: 28-65 degrees jan-june

January- 28 degrees
February-32 degrees
March-39 degrees
April-47 degrees
May 57 degrees
June-65 degrees

Average snowfall in inches:
Jan.-3 inches
Feb.- 2inches
March 1 inch

april 0 inches
may 0 inches


Nashville Weather Records (1871-Present)

Most consecutive days, maximum temperature below freezing: 9, February 6, 1899 & December 26, 1876

Most consecutive days, maximum temperature at or below freezing: 12, February 4-15, 1895

Most consecutive days, maximum temperature failed to reach 20 degrees: 6, February 8, 1899


Highest daily mean temperature: 95, July 14, 1954 & July 28, 1930
Lowest daily mean temperature: -5, January 20, 1985
Highest daily low temperature: 85, July 14, 1954
Lowest daily high temperature: 2, January 12, 1918


Average first autumn freeze: October 28
Earliest autumn freeze: October 2, 1984
Latest first autumn freeze: November 27 (1902 & 2009)
Average last spring freeze: April 6
Earliest last spring freeze: March 5, 1927
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