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Old 08-12-2014, 07:34 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,262,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thetruth33 View Post
New York for example is losing population and businesses every year
Huh? NY State has among the largest numerical gains in population in the U.S., and among the fastest growth rates in the Northeast.

In fact NYC has the highest population growth of any city in the U.S. since the last Census.

And job growth in NYC and NYS are both higher than the national average, and have been so for a long time.
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Old 08-12-2014, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,402,537 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
We have states with more people on welfare than are employed.
Which ones would these be?
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Old 08-12-2014, 12:00 PM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,493,907 times
Reputation: 3411
less congestion and overpopulation in the south.
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Old 08-12-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,005 posts, read 69,444,268 times
Reputation: 10115
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricS39 View Post

Vs year round summer down south, live in gigantic home on golf course and year round access to beach down the street
You are saying the south is like Florida? Because it aint! Most of the south is very poor, very secluded, horrible summer weather with equally bad winters that arent really that warm at all.
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Old 08-12-2014, 02:06 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,730 posts, read 3,144,606 times
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I live in New Orleans, and often think about moving north at some point. New Orleans is an easy city to love, and to become attached to. I love the language, culture, the food, the music, the people.... (sigh).... I even love the usual daily weather here, which makes me almost unique I suppose.

However, I am getting older. Maybe in the north, there is someplace where crime and specifically murder is less of an urgent problem than it is here.

I saw what Hurricane Katrina did to the elderly here; many quietly died of a broken heart in the year or two that followed, although you'd never hear about that from afar. I'd like to be someplace calmer and perhaps even more boring and predictable as I grow older.

Chances are I will not move, because I have been here too long, but I can understand why people do.

Sure, you have snow. We have heat. Both keep people inside a lot. Both can be handled by hiring somebody to cut the grass each week all year long (down here), or cut grass in the summer and shovel snow in the winter (up there). Or, doing it yourself if you are young, strong, and industrious. Your heating bills are high in the winter, and our electric (A/C) bills are high in the summer.
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Old 08-12-2014, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,506,042 times
Reputation: 2927
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA2SGF View Post

Sure, you have snow. We have heat. Both keep people inside a lot. Both can be handled by hiring somebody to cut the grass each week all year long (down here), or cut grass in the summer and shovel snow in the winter (up there). Or, doing it yourself if you are young, strong, and industrious. Your heating bills are high in the winter, and our electric (A/C) bills are high in the summer.
Precisely the pros and cons that I've initially struggled with! After adding in a few more things such as lower pay, fewer opportunities, and disliking the "southern" culture in general I've come to the conclusion that going back home to CT will be my best move.

I'm very excited that I will be back with my friends and family as well and can't wait to land a job back home!
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Old 08-12-2014, 02:35 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,730 posts, read 3,144,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolf39us View Post
Precisely the pros and cons that I've initially struggled with! After adding in a few more things such as lower pay, fewer opportunities, and disliking the "southern" culture in general I've come to the conclusion that going back home to CT will be my best move.

I'm very excited that I will be back with my friends and family as well and can't wait to land a job back home!
That's wonderful! Congratulations on coming to that decision - - I am so happy for you because it sounds like CT is a great place that you really love.

I'm sort of the opposite, in that I really do prefer the southern to the northern culture. And, being retired, I don't gain from higher pay or more opportunities. But gosh, the snow shoveling, lawn mowing, and utility bills seem to be inconvenient or expensive no matter where one lives.
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Old 08-12-2014, 04:52 PM
 
77 posts, read 110,484 times
Reputation: 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Huh? NY State has among the largest numerical gains in population in the U.S., and among the fastest growth rates in the Northeast.

In fact NYC has the highest population growth of any city in the U.S. since the last Census.

And job growth in NYC and NYS are both higher than the national average, and have been so for a long time.

I decided to get the actual numbers to prove my point.

Population growth rate since 1970:
New York- 7.75%
New Jersey- 24.15%
Connecticut- 18.61%
Florida- 187.99%
Georgia- 117.71%
Tennessee- 65.56%

Population growth rate since 2000:
New York- 3.55%
New Jersey- 5.76%
Connecticut- 5.59%
Florida- 22.34%
Georgia- 22.06%
Tennessee- 14.18%
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Old 08-12-2014, 06:53 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,202,051 times
Reputation: 1329
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricS39 View Post
Yet market prices aren't higher down south?

In the south....

houses are bigger and cost less

more land,

lower prices on everything and Lower gas prices at the pump

More shopping centers

More space

Better year round weather

More population growth


So why would anyone not move south? What would make someone not move south within the US?

And why are northeast prices so high despite everything being astronomically better down south?

Take a barren northeast dreary January thru May with absolutely nothing to do but hibernate
Live in a tiny home and pay a fortune waiting patiently for a short summer season where everything is jacked up high as it gets because of peak season

Vs year round summer down south, live in gigantic home on golf course and year round access to beach down the street

Yet why are prices higher up north?
As others have stated before, the reason for the extraordinarily cheap prices for such large homes and amenities in the South is simple supply and demand. Such homes in the South are on large plots of land, and because of that, the population density and the demand will be less, leading to the cheap prices. In contrast, many of the urban areas in the North will have the houses with lesser amounts of land in comparison, leading to higher population density, and higher prices. But, as the saying goes, "you get what you pay for"; the North, while homes are smaller, will feature more dynamic, active, and urban cities with lots of amenities and services for the people, including higher wages, and superior QOL overall. Many southern cities have also found value in the saying; homes near the urban cores of such cities, like Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, etc all can be quite pricey, but with that comes loads of services, and amenities.


That being said, I do agree that the South does indeed have better year round weather, and I'd venture to say that it is the region with the best weather in the country. The only parts of the South that get even remotely cold and barren are areas in the northern/inland areas of the region, such as the Mid-South area, or areas that are high in elevation, like the Piedmont, and Appalachia areas. The rest of the South is pure subtropical paradise, especially the areas in proximity to the coast. During the summer, it has all the beauty of the tropics, with sufficient heat, humidity, and sunshine, as well as frequent thunderstorms to cool things off. Summers, as uncomfortable as they can be at times, are far from extreme; this isn't the Desert Southwest, where temps easily exceed 100F. Contrary to popular belief, all sorts of people are enjoying the great outdoors during the summer in the South, even in the height of the afternoon. Even WITHOUT air-conditioning, you can still live in the South; lots of other tropical, subtropical areas in the world, like India and China, are just as hot and humid, even more so, than the South during summer, and they have some of the largest cities in the world, with lots of pedestrian and street activity, all without air-conditioning. Of course, winters are gorgeous, not too dissimilar to what you see in the Mediterranean and Southern California. All cold fronts do in the Coastal US South during winter is shift the wind, and dry out the air, giving the region day after day of mild, sunny weather without a cloud in sight. Freezes in the Coastal US South occur, AT MOST, only a handful of times a year, and winter weather, be it ice, snow, sleet, etc, are very rare, and nearly unheard of. The Coastal US South has winter warmth of the highest order; you can have temps reaching 70s, 80s, even 90s during winter, and there are lots of "tropical winter days" where low temps are above the 60s, all due to the warm Gulf of Mexico. Winters in the South are warm enough to allow for the cultivation of all kinds of tropical/subtropical plants, such as sugar cane, cotton, citrus, mangoes, bananas, sweet potatoes, yams, jack-fruit, loquats, figs, cantaloupes, watermelon, many types of palms, all of which grow like weeds in many Coastal Southern cities like Houston, New Orleans, Charleston, Tampa, Miami, Corpus Christi, Savannah, etc. Such cities, stay green year-round, with lots of evergreen subtropical trees, and palms growing, and the surrounding coastal bottom-land landscape of such cities stay green year-round as well. You will not need ANY indoor heating/fireplace to survive winter in the South.

The US South is so warm that it it one of the few areas of Earth where a tropical climate, South Florida, exists outside the tropics. South Florida, along with Central Florida, the Texas Barrier Islands, and the Plaquemines peninsula of Louisiana, are the only areas in the continental US where coconut palms can grow decently outdoors. The climate of the South is comparable to that of India, as well as North Africa(in temps only), and is a climactic orgasm. When your city looks like this during winter, as it does throughout the US South, especially in coastal regions, you are in paradise. It is just so ironic how this country is built, with all the cities in the warmer sunbelt being so auto-oriented rather than pedestrian-oriented like in the Northeast, despite the sunbelt having weather more conducive to walking 365 days a year.

Last edited by Yn0hTnA; 08-12-2014 at 07:08 PM..
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Old 08-12-2014, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,422 posts, read 16,984,320 times
Reputation: 9513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
As others have stated before, the reason for the extraordinarily cheap prices for such large homes and amenities in the South is simple supply and demand. Such homes in the South are on large plots of land, and because of that, the population density and the demand will be less, leading to the cheap prices. In contrast, many of the urban areas in the North will have the houses with lesser amounts of land in comparison, leading to higher population density, and higher prices. But, as the saying goes, "you get what you pay for"; the North, while homes are smaller, will feature more dynamic, active, and urban cities with lots of amenities and services for the people, including higher wages, and superior QOL overall. Many southern cities have also found value in the saying; homes near the urban cores of such cities, like Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, etc all can be quite pricey, but with that comes loads of services, and amenities.


That being said, I do agree that the South does indeed have better year round weather, and I'd venture to say that it is the region with the best weather in the country. The only parts of the South that get even remotely cold and barren are areas in the northern/inland areas of the region, such as the Mid-South area, or areas that are high in elevation, like the Piedmont, and Appalachia areas. The rest of the South is pure subtropical paradise, especially the areas in proximity to the coast. During the summer, it has all the beauty of the tropics, with sufficient heat, humidity, and sunshine, as well as frequent thunderstorms to cool things off. Summers, as uncomfortable as they can be at times, are far from extreme; this isn't the Desert Southwest, where temps easily exceed 100F. Contrary to popular belief, all sorts of people are enjoying the great outdoors during the summer in the South, even in the height of the afternoon. Even WITHOUT air-conditioning, you can still live in the South; lots of other tropical, subtropical areas in the world, like India and China, are just as hot and humid, even more so, than the South during summer, and they have some of the largest cities in the world, with lots of pedestrian and street activity, all without air-conditioning. Of course, winters are gorgeous, not too dissimilar to what you see in the Mediterranean and Southern California. All cold fronts do in the Coastal US South during winter is shift the wind, and dry out the air, giving the region day after day of mild, sunny weather without a cloud in sight. Freezes in the Coastal US South occur, AT MOST, only a handful of times a year, and winter weather, be it ice, snow, sleet, etc, are very rare, and nearly unheard of. The Coastal US South has winter warmth of the highest order; you can have temps reaching 70s, 80s, even 90s during winter, and there are lots of "tropical winter days" where low temps are above the 60s, all due to the warm Gulf of Mexico. Winters in the South are warm enough to allow for the cultivation of all kinds of tropical/subtropical plants, such as sugar cane, cotton, citrus, mangoes, bananas, sweet potatoes, yams, jack-fruit, loquats, figs, cantaloupes, watermelon, many types of palms, all of which grow like weeds in many Coastal Southern cities like Houston, New Orleans, Charleston, Tampa, Miami, Corpus Christi, Savannah, etc. Such cities, stay green year-round, with lots of evergreen subtropical trees, and palms growing, and the surrounding coastal bottom-land landscape of such cities stay green year-round as well. You will not need ANY indoor heating/fireplace to survive winter in the South.

The US South is so warm that it it one of the few areas of Earth where a tropical climate, South Florida, exists outside the tropics. South Florida, along with Central Florida, the Texas Barrier Islands, and the Plaquemines peninsula of Louisiana, are the only areas in the continental US where coconut palms can grow decently outdoors. The climate of the South is comparable to that of India, as well as North Africa(in temps only), and is a climactic orgasm. When your city looks like this during winter, as it does throughout the US South, especially in coastal regions, you are in paradise. It is just so ironic how this country is built, with all the cities in the warmer sunbelt being so auto-oriented rather than pedestrian-oriented like in the Northeast, despite the sunbelt having weather more conducive to walking 365 days a year.
Nice story bro ... But you've obviously never spent a winter in North Florida, coastal Georgia and the the coastal Carolinas, or southern Alabama, Mississippi and the Florida panhandle.

It gets QUITE COLD here in Savannah during the winter, with 30-plus days below freezing and usually at least a handful of days in the teens. Even on days when it's not sub-freezing, the weather tends to be breezy, gray and cool. Factor in the humidity, and sea breezes, and it can get quite miserable. Sure, compared to places further north our winters are relatively mild. But they are far from the "tropical paradise" that you make them out to be.

The HIGHEST January temp ever recorded in Savannah was 84*. The average high for January is 60*; the average low is 38*. Further, January and February in Savannah receive the lowest amount of sunshine days of out of the entire year, about 50 percent of days are overcast or cloudy. There is no growing season from Dec-Feb.

Get by without heat?! ROTFL! Central heat is as much a necessity here in winter as AC is in summer. The cold humidity makes sure of that! Most everybody here has a fireplace --- and in the winter, we use them!

BOTTOM LINE: Sure, compared to places further north our winters are relatively mild. But we DO have winter. Spend a year living in Savannah and you'll know that!

Last edited by Newsboy; 08-12-2014 at 08:34 PM..
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