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Old 08-12-2014, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,126,475 times
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I tried living in Charlotte during the month of February last year and it snowed a couple of times and there were many nights in which it was like 35 degrees. That's when I said to myself, "people seriously move down here for....this?" The difference isn't that big as some people make it out to be. There are MANY times where I have compared the current temperature here in Connecticut to that of various places in the South, and the difference is often only 5-10 degrees. Big deal.

Also last winter I was in Tucson, AZ and it was FREEZING. It was like 35 degrees. And another time I was in San Antonio and it was freezing rain and 35 degrees. In San Antonio!
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Old 08-12-2014, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,966,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I tried living in Charlotte during the month of February last year and it snowed a couple of times and there were many nights in which it was like 35 degrees. That's when I said to myself, "people seriously move down here for....this?" The difference isn't that big as some people make it out to be. There are MANY times where I have compared the current temperature here in Connecticut to that of various places in the South, and the difference is often only 5-10 degrees. Big deal.

Also last winter I was in Tucson, AZ and it was FREEZING. It was like 35 degrees. And another time I was in San Antonio and it was freezing rain and 35 degrees. In San Antonio!
So now the South is a miserable place to live because it gets both cold AND hot?! Gotcha!

BTW ... both the coldest AND the hottest place I've EVER been in my life was Manhattan. It was 105 degrees on 5Th Avenue in July, and -10 on the Westside Highway the next February.

Figure that one out.
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Old 08-12-2014, 09:06 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,166,272 times
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City Climate Comparisons


not really as much different as people might think

am surprised that Charlotte lows are lower than NYC and nearly mimic Philly - highs a little higher when compared to both
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Old 08-12-2014, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,966,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
City Climate Comparisons


not really as much different as people might think

am surprised that Charlotte lows are lower than NYC and nearly mimic Philly - highs a little higher when compared to both
Which just proves the point: All this BS about the north being SO MUCH colder than the south, and the South being SO MUCH hotter than the north, is just that -- BS.

Three summers ago, I was in South Dakota in July. The AIR TEMP was 120*. It has never, ever in history been that hot in Georgia -- EVER!

People can make up s*** and believe what they want to believe, but it doesn't make it true.

Tonight in Savannah, GA we are in the mid-70s with low humidity. It's amazingly pleasant. I'm sure most people assume I am lying.
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Old 08-12-2014, 09:46 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,199,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Nice story bro ... But you've obviously never spent a winter in North Florida, coastal Georgia and the the coastal Carolinas, or southern Alabama, Mississippi and the Florida panhandle.

It gets QUITE COLD here in Savannah during the winter, with 30-plus days below freezing and usually at least a handful of days in the teens. Even on days when it's not sub-freezing, the weather tends to be breezy, gray and cool. Factor in the humidity, and sea breezes, and it can get quite miserable. Sure, compared to places further north our winters are relatively mild. But they are far from the "tropical paradise" that you make them out to be.

The HIGHEST January temp ever recorded in Savannah was 84*. The average high for January is 60*; the average low is 38*. Further, January and February in Savannah receive the lowest amount of sunshine days of out of the entire year, about 50 percent of days are overcast or cloudy. There is no growing season from Dec-Feb.

Get by without heat?! ROTFL! Central heat is as much a necessity here in winter as AC is in summer. The cold humidity makes sure of that! Most everybody here has a fireplace --- and in the winter, we use them!

BOTTOM LINE: Sure, compared to places further north our winters are relatively mild. But we DO have winter. Spend a year living in Savannah and you'll know that!
The coastal South areas of southern Mississippi, southern Alabama, North Florida, and coastal Georgia and the coastal Carolinas are indeed the colder parts of the region, in comparison to warmer areas like the Texas and Louisiana coasts, as well as Central/South Florida. However, they are still SUBtropical paradise, with the nice, rainy summers of the tropics combined with sunny winters similar to what you see in the Mediterranean, allowing all kinds of crops to grow easily.

The official airport of Savannah records 20 days with mins at or below freezing; however, the downtown of Savannah, as well as all the sea islands, are closer to the ocean, and experience much less freezes. All cold-fronts really do in the Coastal South, in cities like Savannah, is shift the wind, and dry out the air. As the cold front is passing, the intermittent weather will be cloudy and cool, but after the cold front... day after day of mild winter sunshine, much like the Mediterranean; most cities in the South get a lot of their sunny, cloudless days during the cool season, due to the cold-fronts bringing drier air. The dry air, plus the low-latitude subtropical sun, mean quick warm-ups during the day. The record high temp for Jan in Savannah you put up further prove my point that the Coastal US South gets many "tropical winter days," where highs can reach the 80s, and lows can be above the 60s. The regions of the Coastal South you list are all in the USDA zone 9 isotherm, meaning that the lowest temp during winter is at or above 20F much of the time, so there's no "handful of teens." Teens in the coastal South, in fact, would be a natural disaster, and would harm all the lush subtropical flora growing there. Yes, you can get by without heat in the Coastal US South, even in the areas you list; areas in subtropical China are colder during winter than those areas, and they don't have heat. The US Coastal South is like Northern India when it comes to climate, yet people in Northern India use neither heat in the winter, nor AC during summer.

Here is Savannah during the winter; you can see that as with the rest of the Coastal US South, Savannah is lush and green YEAR-ROUND:

http://www.2wired2tired.com/wp-conte...ah-Georgia.jpg


Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I tried living in Charlotte during the month of February last year and it snowed a couple of times and there were many nights in which it was like 35 degrees. That's when I said to myself, "people seriously move down here for....this?" The difference isn't that big as some people make it out to be. There are MANY times where I have compared the current temperature here in Connecticut to that of various places in the South, and the difference is often only 5-10 degrees. Big deal.

Also last winter I was in Tucson, AZ and it was FREEZING. It was like 35 degrees. And another time I was in San Antonio and it was freezing rain and 35 degrees. In San Antonio!
Charlotte is high up in the mountains of the South, and thus it is expected that its winters would rival many cities in the North. The Coastal parts of the South are as warm as Northern India during winter; until you can grow all sorts of palms and other subtropical trees in Conneticut; until you have alligators, and parrots all thriving in Connecticut, until places in Conneticut are growing sugar cane, rice, bananas, and citrus, and until thick evergreen forests laden with spanish moss grows in Conneticut, there is no way that anyone in their right mind would say that "the difference isn't that large."

Unlike in the North, where some form of winter precip is expected every winter, in the South, especially coastal cities, winter precip is nearly unheard of. It can be DECADES until winter precip of any kind ever strikes San Antonio again. And if it was 35F in Tuscon, then it was never freezing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
So now the South is a miserable place to live because it gets both cold AND hot?! Gotcha!

BTW ... both the coldest AND the hottest place I've EVER been in my life was Manhattan. It was 105 degrees on 5Th Avenue in July, and -10 on the Westside Highway the next February.

Figure that one out.
The North can get just as hot and humid as the South. The South just has the subtropical atmosphere that ensures that temps are more stable, and swing much less, than those of the North; as consistently hot and humid many Southern cities can get during summer, their record highs in those months are nearly matched, matched, or even exceeded by many cities in the North. For example, New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia all have a higher record high temp than Tampa or New Orleans, despite the latter group of cities being consistently warmer during summer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
City Climate Comparisons


not really as much different as people might think

am surprised that Charlotte lows are lower than NYC and nearly mimic Philly - highs a little higher when compared to both
Yes it is.

You Northerners desperately try to prove that point is true by picking cities in the South high upon the mountains, like Charlotte. It is expected that mountainous cities will see quite a bit of cold that rival more northerly areas of lower elevation. Of course, if you pick low elevation cities in the coastal south like Houston, New Orleans, Corpus Christi, etc, you would see that they are way warmer than Philly and NYC.

Last edited by Yn0hTnA; 08-12-2014 at 09:55 PM..
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Old 08-12-2014, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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I love how somebody who doesn't live in Savannah is telling me about the climate of Savannah.

Come spend a winter here and then give me your opinion.
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Old 08-12-2014, 10:46 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,199,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
I love how somebody who doesn't live in Savannah is telling me about the climate of Savannah.

Come spend a winter here and then give me your opinion.
I have been to Savannah before during a winter vacation, and in my opinion, the weather in Savannah during winter, like all of the Coastal US South, is quite mild and sunny, and is as good as what Southern California has to offer.

It can feel cold to you, as, in the end, temperature is relative; after all, people from the tropics can consider temps in the 60s to be freezing, while people in the Minnesota can wear shorts when temps are in the 30s. However, it doesn't change the fact that the temperature magnitude during winter in Savannah, and the rest of the Coastal South is quite similar to what you get in the Mediterranean and Northern India, and is not at all in the cold range. If people in those two regions can go without heat during winter, then so can people in Savannah.

Savannah, like the rest of the Coastal Us South cities, is green all year, and is warm enough to sustain banana production. This is a banana plantation just outside of Savannah:
http://i1186.photobucket.com/albums/...nanaPlants.jpg
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Old 08-12-2014, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Derby, CT
3,584 posts, read 2,503,419 times
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Attempt to live in any northern state without heat and you'll be sure to freeze lol

I grew up in the north and live in the south. Even when the temperature drops below freezing, it's no where near as bad as the northern winters. Temperatures up north are colder for longer and have little sun to counteract the overnight frost quickly enough to do much of anything. There is simply no contest... Winters in the south are nothing in comparison!
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Old 08-13-2014, 12:10 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,966,698 times
Reputation: 9513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
I have been to Savannah before during a winter vacation, and in my opinion, the weather in Savannah during winter, like all of the Coastal US South, is quite mild and sunny, and is as good as what Southern California has to offer.

It can feel cold to you, as, in the end, temperature is relative; after all, people from the tropics can consider temps in the 60s to be freezing, while people in the Minnesota can wear shorts when temps are in the 30s. However, it doesn't change the fact that the temperature magnitude during winter in Savannah, and the rest of the Coastal South is quite similar to what you get in the Mediterranean and Northern India, and is not at all in the cold range. If people in those two regions can go without heat during winter, then so can people in Savannah.

Savannah, like the rest of the Coastal Us South cities, is green all year, and is warm enough to sustain banana production. This is a banana plantation just outside of Savannah:
http://i1186.photobucket.com/albums/...nanaPlants.jpg
Uh ... NO! I run my heat in winter in Savannah, for good reason. Temps in the 20s and 30s demand HEAT!

Homeless people have been known to FREEZE to death in Savannah in winter.

Also, bananas plants may grow BUT DO NOT MAKE FRUIT in Savannah. Where did you get THAT from?! Even citrus is VERY HARD to grow this far north.

You really have no idea what you're talking about.

Last edited by Newsboy; 08-13-2014 at 12:18 AM..
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Old 08-13-2014, 12:40 AM
 
1,193 posts, read 877,171 times
Reputation: 1867
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
That being said, I do agree that the South does indeed have better year round weather, and I'd venture to say that it is the region with the best weather in the country.
Someone's never been to Honolulu (which is cooler than the South in the summer and warmer in the winter) or Coastal California. No one who had traveled much would argue that the South has then best weather in the country. You could make an argument that it's not the worst.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Yes, you can get by without heat in the Coastal US South, even in the areas you list; areas in subtropical China are colder during winter than those areas, and they don't have heat. The US Coastal South is like Northern India when it comes to climate, yet people in Northern India use neither heat in the winter, nor AC during summer.
The reason a lot of people in China and India don't have modern amenities like air-conditioning, heat, or running water has nothing to do with climate and everything to do with the fact that they are poor people living in third-world countries. The median family in China in 2012 made about $2100 for the year, India is even lower. People with more middle class incomes that can afford A/C and heat for the most part do have it, it's is just that that is a small percentage of the population. Humans can survive lots of different climates on earth from the Arctic to tropical rain-forests. But most people with adequate income in modern societies would prefer to keep their home somewhere between 60 and 80 degrees.
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